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@mark f

I know you said The Pawnbroker is your favorite Lumet but I'd be curious as too how you rank and rate his films, if you have a minute
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Yeah, there's no body mutilation in it



"Money won is twice as sweet as money earned."



Sad you didn't think much of U.S Go Home but not surprised, and i'm glad you gave it a shot or another shot most likely. Did you watch it because of me mentioning how much i liked it, or is my ego getting out of control again haha?

Also what's your favourite Bunuel after Belle De Jour? Think i remember you saying that was your favourite. Just wondering because i'm planning on watching a few of his films this month and i've already seen Belle De Jour. Going to watch Los Olvidados and L'Age d'Or and i'd like to see at least two others.



Bright light. Bright light. Uh oh.
Yes Camo, I did watch it for the first time because you wrote about it. Your love of Nico and Vincent Gallo may explain your opinion - I'm basically indifferent to both. As far as Bunuel, my fave is actually The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie but besides Belle de Jour I also really like Robinson Crusoe and The Diary of a Chambermaid.

donnie, I'll get your Lumet list up soon
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It's what you learn after you know it all that counts. - John Wooden
My IMDb page




American Satan (Ash Avildsen, 2017)


A metal band, led by Johnny Faust (Andy Biersack), has to choose between the Devil (Malcolm McDowell) and an Angel (Bill Duke) [both in human form] to try to become successful.
Never head of American Satan, but it sounds like something I'd enjoy.

I recognize a lot of these reviews from browsing the Movie Tab archives and from when you've reposted some of them in countdowns, but I want to let you know that I appreciate the time and effort you've gone through to repost them in here as individual posts. After watching certain films, I sometimes like to look up reviews on here to see what others think, and it'd be a shame to be denied the opinions and thoughts of the Master of Movies, so I'm thankful that they're now included in the database and can be easily found. I'm sure it was a tiresome process to comb back through so many years of posts.

You da man, Mark!
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Bright light. Bright light. Uh oh.

From Straight A's to XXX (Vanessa Parise, 2017)

Sampha: Process (Kahlil Joseph, 2017)
+
I Didn't Kill My Sister aka Murder Unresolved (Jason Borque, 2016)

Bedazzled (Stanley Donen, 1967)
+

The Devil (Peter Cook) shares some quality time with lovesick Dudley Moore while trying to get ahold of his soul.
Flashback aka Crossfire (Claude Desrosiers, 2016)

Get Out Alive (George Erschbamer, 2016)

Stalker's Prey (Colin Theys, 2017)

Roman J. Israel, Esq. (Dan Gilroy, 2017)
+

Lawyer Denzel Washington tries to create a class action lawsuit which may involve everyone.
Baby Snatcher (Joyce Chopra, 1992)

Nanny Cam (Nancy Leopardi, 2014)

The War Zone (Tim Roth, 1999)
+
Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets (Luc Besson, 2017)
-

Major Valerian (Dane DeHaan) and Sgt. Laureline (Cara Delevigne) take a brief holographic vacation before trying to save the universe.
The Killing Game (Bobby Roth, 2011)

An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power (Bonni Cohen & Jon Shenk, 2017)

The Front (Tom McLoughlin, 2010)

Cowspiracy: The Sustainability Secret (Kip Andersen & Keegan Kuhn, 2014)
+

The movie offers statistics that the raising and eating of animal products is the primary cause of climate change, greenhouse gases, water shortages and heart diseases.
Smoke Screen (Gary Yates, 2010)
-
Blue Smoke (David Carsom, 2007)
+
Midnight Bayou (Ralph Hemecker, 2009)

Murder on the Orient Express (Kenneth Branagh, 2017)

The 12 people on the Calais Coach (a jury?) prepare to hear the solving of the crime by Inspector Hercule Poirot (Kenneth Branagh).



Your love of Nico and Vincent Gallo may explain your opinion - I'm basically indifferent to both.
That's probably it. I hate Gallo as a person from what i've read about him but the guy works for me a lot in every role i've seen him in. Quite the dilemma haha. He wasn't even playing an a-hole like in Buffalo '66 here, he was the most likeable character in the film.

Also Nico was basically a Nazi so i'm not exactly a fan of her as a person either, her music though.



Bright light. Bright light. Uh oh.
You a Sampha fan, Mark?
Not exactly. That film was on MUBI and I liked his pop better than the stuff that's won Grammies lately. The visuals are sometimes great though and the best music he did was not from the album but was hauntingly played over the closing credits. I can't find it anywhere but MUBI to share it.



Bright light. Bright light. Uh oh.
I know you said The Pawnbroker is your favorite Lumet but I'd be curious as too how you rank and rate his films, if you have a minute
I was going to order these but I spent enough time on this already.

12 Angry Men
8/10
Stage Struck
5/10
That Kind of Woman
5'10
The Fugitive Kind
6/10
Long Day's Journey into Night
6.5/10
The Pawnbroker
8/10
Fail Safe
7/10
The Hill
6/10
The Group
6/10
The Deadly Affair
5.5/10
Bye Bye Braverman
5.5/10
The Sea Gull
6/10
The Appointment
4/10
King: A Filmed Record... Montgomery to Memphis.
7/10
The Anderson Tapes
6.5/10
Last of the Mobile Hot Shots
5/10
Child's Play
6.5/10
The Offence
5.5/10
Serpico
8/10
Lovin' Molly
5.5/10
Murder on the Orient Express
8/10
Dog Day Afternoon
8/10
Network
8/10
Equus
6/10
The Wiz
6.5/10
Just Tell Me What You Want
6/10
Prince of the City
7.5/10
Deathtrap
7/10
The Verdict
7/10
Daniel
6.5/10
Power
6/10
Running on Empty
6/10
Family Business
6/10
Q & A
6/10
A Stranger Among Us
6/10
Guilty as Sin
5.5/10
Night Falls on Manhattan
6/10
Critical Care
5.5/10
Gloria
5/10
Strip Search
6.5/10
Find Me Guilty
6.5/10
Before the Devil Knows You're Dead
6/10



Bright light. Bright light. Uh oh.

We Have Your Husband (Eric Bross, 2011)

Freedom on My Mind (Connie Field & Marilyn Mulford, 1994)

You May Now Kill the Bride (Kohl Glass, 2016)

A.I. Artificial Intelligence (Steven Spielberg, 2001)


David (Haley Joel Osment) is exposed to plenty of mankind’s inhumanity.
The Detective (Gordon Douglas, 1968)

Secrets in Suburbia (Damian Romay, 2017)

Sullivan’s Banks (Heinz Emigholz, 2000)

Four Days in November (Mel Stuart, 1964)


Four days in 1963 depicting the assassination, the bizarre aftermath and the funeral of JFK.
Robert Frost: A Lover's Quarrel with the World (Shirley Clarke, 1963)
-
On the Bowery (Lionel Rogosin, 1956)

Maillart’s Bridges (Heinz Emigholz, 2001)

The Mountain Between Us (Hany Abu-Assad, 2016)
-

After a small plane crash, surgeon Idris Elba and photojournalist Kate Winslet find themselves stranded in the Rocky Mountains and have to hike to freedom.
Six Shooter (Martin McDonagh, 2004)

Happily Buried (Felix E. Feist, 1939)

Give Me My Baby (Danny J. Boyle, 2016)

Wonder (Stephen Chbosky, 2017)
+

Augie (Jacob Tremblay) enters middle school after undergoing 27 operations to make his appearance more normal and only being home-schooled.
Walking Out (Smith Bros., 2017)

My Baby Is Missing (Neill Fearnley, 2007)

Braven (Lin Oeding, 2018)

The King’s Choice (Erik Poppe, 2016)


When the Nazis arrive in 1940 to occupy Norway, King Haakon VII (Jasper Christensen) must find a way to protect the country.



I liked Running On Empty a lot more than i thought i would. Thought it would be a run of the mill drama, maybe it was but i'm really into families trying to adapt to a life on the run stories and i thought River Phoenix, Judd Hirsch and especially Christine Lahti were great.



Bright light. Bright light. Uh oh.

Thunder Birds: Soldiers of the Air (William A. Wellman, 1942)
+
An Inconvenient Truth (Davis Guggenheim, 2006)
+
Sorority Surrogate aka A Surrogate’s Terror (John L'Ecuyer, 2014)

The B-Side: Elsa Dorfman's Portrait Photography (Errol Morris, 2017)
-

One of the thousands of hand-signed photos that Elsa Dorfman took of her friends.
Strip Search (Sidney Lumet, 2004)

The Wrong Child (David DeCoteau, 2016)
+
Porcos Raivosos aka Enraged Pigs (Isabel Penoni & Leonardo Sette, 2012)

Sergei/Sir Gay (Mark Rappaport, 2016)


Visionary director Sergei Eisenstein had plenty of homoerotic imagery in his drawings and films.
A Neighbor's Deception (Devon Downs & Kenny Gage, 2017)

Félicité (Alain Gomos, 2017)

An Officer and a Murderer (Norma Bailey, 2012)

My Friend Dahmer (Marc Meyers, 2017)
-

High schooler Jeffrey Dahmer (Ross Lynch) lets out more of his true emotions the more he spends time with some friends from school.
The Cheating Pact (Doug Campbell, 2013)

The Double Life of Paul Henreid (Mark Rappaport, 2017)
+
Indiscretion (John Stewart Muller, 2016)

Tess (Roman Polanski, 1979)


Innocent, teenage Tess (Nastassja Kinski) is destined to a life of pain due to the wretchedness of her family and the abuse of men.
Untitled (Michael Glawogger & Monika Villi, 2017)
+
Gamer (Neveldine & Taylor, 2009)

The Journey (Nick Hamm, 2017)

God’s Own Country (Francis Lee, 2017)
-

Yorkshire farmer Josh O’Connor’s growing intimacy with Romanian seasonal worker Alec Secareanu causes both men to become more aware of the natural beauty surrounding them.



Bright light. Bright light. Uh oh.

Signed, Sealed, Delivered: One in a Million (Kevin Fair, 2016)
-
Separated at Birth (Jean-François Rivard, 2017)

Cradle Swapping (Michael Feifer, 2017)

The Red Shoes (Michael Powell & Emeric Pressburger, 1948)


Moira Shearer is in another world when she dances the Red Shoes Ballet.
Blondie’s Holiday (Abby Berlin, 1947)
+
Swing High (Jack Cummmgs, 1932)
+
Dead on Campus (Curtis Crawford, 2014)

Darling (John Schlesinger, 1965)


[size=1]Model Julie Christie sleeps her way to the ironic top in the Swinging Sixties.
Magical Girl (Carlos Vermut, 2014)

Stronger (David Gordon Green, 2017)

Psycho Brother In-Law (Jose Montesinos, 2017)

Phantom Thread (Paul Thomas Anderson, 2017)


Fashion designer Daniel Day-Lewis and his close assistant (Vicky Krieps) often argue about who’s in charge of personal time they share together.
Falling in Love (Ulu Grosbard, 1984)

Bad Stepmother (Jeffrey Scott Lando, 2018)

Signed, Sealed, Delivered: From the Heart (Lynne Stopkewich, 2016)
+
Get Out (Jordan Peele, 2017)


Things get more than a little weird when photographer Daniel Kaluuya visits his girlfriend’s family’s country home on the weekend.
Thank You for Your Service (Jason Hall, 2017)
+
Patriots Day (Peter Berg, 2016)

Fourteen Hours (Henry Hathaway, 1951)

The Boom (Vittorio De Sica, 1963)


Social satire has “wealthy socialist” Alberto Sordi consider selling one of his eyes when his money dries up.



Cradle Swapping (Michael Feifer, 2017)
My feeble brain so read this as Michelle Pfeiffer first off and I thought "ooh, she's moved into directing" lol.

Never heard of him so had to look him up and turns out he has 53 directing credits in 13 years of which I have seen the sum total of zero Is that the first of his you've seen Mark? From your rating of this one, his volume of work, his wife's 'acting' credits and much of it being either direct to video or made for television I'm guessing he's more a functional/hobbyist director with no particular flair??
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Purely for the benefit of my bad memory: 2016 • • • 2017 • • •
2018 • • • 12 • • • C&C • • • 110 • • • Summer • • • Noms


Almost famous for having nailed Madonna once



movies can be okay...
I'm happy you watched "Magical Girl". I'm curious to know your thoughts on it, all I can get now is that you may or may not have liked it?
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"A film has to be a dialogue, not a monologue — a dialogue to provoke in the viewer his own thoughts, his own feelings. And if a film is a dialogue, then it’s a good film; if it’s not a dialogue, it’s a bad film."
- Michael "Gloomy Old Fart" Haneke