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Genesis of the Daleks -

The Watch -

Dimensions In Time -

Guardians of the Galaxy -

Dreamland -


Page 2:

Wreck-It Ralph -

The Three Doctors -


Page 3:

Ted -

Terror of the Zygons -

Iron Man 2

Time Crash

The Infinite Quest

The Lost World: Jurassic Park -

Love & Monsters -

Jurassic Park 3 -

The Edge of Destruction


Page 4:

Jurassic World -

Doctor Who: The Movie -

Little Fockers -

Day of the Doctor -


Page 5:

Ratatouille -

Deep Breath -

The Blair Witch Project -

Dalek -

Journey To The Center of the Earth-


Page 6:

School Reunion -

Thunderbirds -

The Invisible Enemy -

Donald Trump's The Art of the Deal - The Movie -


Page 7:

Russian Ark -

Britain's Got Talent: Episode One -


Page 8:

Enemy of the World -

Bedtime Stories -

Time And The Rani -


Page 9:

The Two Doctors -

The Eleventh Hour -

The Curse of Clyde Langer -

Samsara -

The Stolen Earth/Journey's End -


Page 10:

The Big Chill -

Britain's Got Talent: Episode Two -

Michael McIntyre's Big Show: Episode One -

The Sontaran Experiment -

The War Games -


Page 11:

The Five(ish) Doctors Reboot -

The Intouchables -

Earthshock -

StreetDance 3D -

Aliens of London/World War Three -


Page 12:

Dr. Dolittle 3 -

Friend From The Future -

Britain's Got Talent Episode Three -

Michael McIntyre's Big Show: Episode Two -


Page 13:

The Jungle Book (1967) -

The Jungle Book (2016) -

Life In A Day -

A Fix With Sontarans -

Britain's Got Talent: Episode Four -

Michael McIntyre's Big Show: Episode Three -

Night of the Doctor -


Page 14:

Let's Kill Hitler -

42 -

Britain's Got Talent: Episode Five -

Britain's Got Talent: Episode Six -

Michael McIntyre's Big Show: Episode Four -

Technophobia -

Britain's Got Talent: Episode Seven -


Page 15:

Michael McIntyre's Big Show: Episode Five -

Britain's Got Talent: Semi Final 1 -

Britain's Got Talent: Semi Final 2 -

Time Reaver -

Britain's Got Talent: Semi Final 3 -

Britain's Got Talent - Semi Final 4 -

Death and the Queen -

Britain's Got Talent: Semi Final 5 -

The Stockbridge Showdown -

The Fantastic Four (1994) -


Page 16:

Britain's Got Talent Final 2016 -

Michael McIntyre's Big Show: Episode Six -

Sleep No More -

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory -


Page 17:

Logopolis -

The Time Meddler -

Little Miss Sunshine -


Page 18:

Agents of SHIELD Season One -

Spearhead From Space -

Agents of SHIELD Season Two -

The Invasion -

Agents of SHIELD: Season Three -

The Mutant Phase -

Underdog -


Page 19:

The Dalek Extermination of Earth -

LEGO Harry Potter: Years 1-4 -

Planet of the Dead -

Grey Gardens -

The Ark In Space -

Mamma Mia -

Gotham: Season One -


Page 20:

Gotham: Rise of the Villains -

Journey To The Centre of the TARDIS -

Psycho -

The Wedding of Sarah Jane Smith -


Page 21:

The Magic Roundabout (2005) -

The End of the World -

Scooby-Doo -

The Beginning -

Wall.E -


Page 22:

The Web of Fear -

Independence Day -

The Iron Legion -

Flushed Away -

Doctor Who: Evacuation Earth -

Les Miserables -

Planet of the Spiders -


Page 23:

SpaceCamp -

The Ribos Operation -

The Pirate Planet -

The Stones of Blood -

The Androids of Tara -


Page 24:

The Power of Kroll -

The Armageddon Factor -

Maggie Simpson In The Longest Daycare -

Shaun of the Dead -

The Flintstones -

Cats & Dogs -


Page 25:

Ghostbusters (1984) -

Ghostbusters 2 -

Ghostbusters (2016) -

Terror of the Autons -


Page 26:

The Five Obstructions -

The End of Time -

Norbit -

The Twin Dilemma -

The Cat In The Hat -

The Fourth Wall -

Agent Carter: Season One -

Remembrance of the Daleks -


Page 27:

G-Force -

The Blame Game -

Speed Racer -

Paradise Towers -

Madagascar: Escape 2 Africa -

The Sontaran Stratagem/The Poison Sky -


Page 28:

Mr Bean's Holiday -

The Wrong Doctors -

Hot Fuzz -

Fallen Angels -

Die Hard -

Judoon In Chains -


Page 29:

Dr Who And The Daleks -

Harvest of the Sycorax -

Thor: The Dark World -

The Sontaran Ordeal -

Singin' In The Rain -


Page 30:

The Caretaker -

Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory -

The Invasion - Animation of Episodes One and Two -

Alvin And The Chipmunks -

The Empty Child/The Doctor Dances -


Page 31:

Wallace and Gromit’s World of Invention -

2012 -

Marco Polo (Telesnap Reconstruction) - Telesnap reconstruction:
, Doctor Who Classic Series Serial Potential -

Grease Live -

The Unicorn and the Wasp -

Juno -


Page 32:

Toy Story 3D -

Rise of the Cybermen/Age of Steel -

Gravity -

Super Cafe: Who's A Hero -


Page 33:

Two & Two -

Moving In -

Class: For Tonight We Might Die -

The Coach With The Dragon Tattoo -

Nightvisiting -

Fantastic Beasts And Where To Find Them -

The Dying Light -



Page 34:

La La Land -

The LEGO Batman Movie -

The Greatest Show In The Galaxy -

The Pilot -

Smile -

Thin Ice (TV) -

Guardians of the Galaxy Volume 2 -

Knock Knock -

Extremis/The Pyramid At The End Of The World/The Lie Of The Land -



Page 35:

Oxygen -

[color="blue"]Extremis/The Pyramid At The End Of The World/Lie Of The Land -

Empress of Mars -

The Eaters of Light -


Page 36:

World Enough And Time/The Doctor Falls -

Angry Video Game Nerd: The Movie -

Spider-Man: Homecoming -

The Year After I Died -


Page 37:

Wednesdays For Beginners -

Trust Me -


Blue - Doctor Who
Green - Doctor Who spinoffs/fanmade content
Red - LEGO

Genesis of the Daleks review

Genesis of the Daleks is often thought of as a classic among us Whovians; so golden, in fact, that it would probably destroy an entire Cyberman fleet. It's obvious why, for Genesis of the Daleks is an excellent tale of morality that even manages to surpass the excellence of the very first Dalek serial 'The Daleks'.

One thing that's very clever about Genesis is how Terry Nation scatters hints throughout at what the Kaleds will become. The Kaleds already believe in purity. They already want to exterminate those whom they see as inferior. It's not hard to see that these Kaleds will become the machines of hatred we love to hate. Terry Nation was, of course, inspired by the Nazis when he created the Daleks; the Kaleds are already essentially Nazis here.

If the Kaleds are Nazis, then that makes the primary antagonist of this six parter, Davros, as their Hitler. And what a great Hitler he makes. Michael Wisher is brilliant; at all times, he seems every bit as intimidating as you would naturally expect for a scientist dictator desperate to see his new creation the Daleks succeed.

What truly sets this serial among the true greats of Doctor Who, however, is the gripping exploration of the Doctor's morality. The 'Do I have the right?' speech is an iconic and defining moment for the show, and for good reason too. The classic series isn't particularly known for its writing but the famous speech is as good as, if not better than the superior writing and dialogue of the new series.

Simply put: Genesis of the Daleks is a masterpiece and if you don't like it, you should be exterminated.

Genesis of the Daleks -



Genesis of the Daleks is often thought of as a classic among us Whovians
Yes.

Michael Wisher is brilliant
He is, and it is a shame for various reasons he was never able to play the role again.

The classic series isn't particularly known for its writing but the famous speech is as good as, if not better than the superior writing and dialogue of the new series.
I must strongly disagree with you here. The classic series had some exceptionally well written stories. Actually, one thing you didn't mention was the acting – would you class the new series as superior in that respect too?



He is, and it is a shame for various reasons he was never able to play the role again.
Michael Wisher and Julian Bleach will always be the best versions of Davros.

Actually, one thing you didn't mention was the acting – would you class the new series as superior in that respect too?
Obviously it largely depends on the story but overall I think the new series definitely sees a vast improvement in acting over the classic. The low point in the classic series is Marcus Hammond as Antodus in The Daleks. The way he delivers the line 'I can't hold on' always makes me cringe to the point where I'm glad when he falls to his death.

Even if you compare that to the low point in the new series, Peter Kay as Victor Kennedy, at least he is somewhat convincing as Victor even if he is laughably bad as the Abzorbaloff.

As for the high points: Tom Baker in Genesis of the Daleks VS probably David Tennant in The Water of Mars, it's definitely David Tennant's performance that comes out on top for me. I just think it's a shame Russell T Davies didn't follow up the Time Lord Victorious in The End of Time until (arguably) the 'So much more!' scene before the farewell tour.



Michael Wisher and Julian Bleach will always be the best versions of Davros.
I didn't see all of his last appearance but I liked Bleach because he seems to be doing an homage to all his predecessors really. In his first story what I didn't like was that he was too physical in the chair. Davros shouldn't be Doctor Strangelove, you know? Terry Molloy was great too, and in his audios – Davros especially I think. And David Gooderson had a difficult job and a terrible mask to work under – it looks like they just cut Wisher's old one about a bit to make it fit.

Obviously it largely depends on the story but overall I think the new series definitely sees a vast improvement in acting over the classic. The low point in the classic series is Marcus Hammond as Antodus in The Daleks. The way he delivers the line 'I can't hold on' always makes me cringe to the point where I'm glad when he falls to his death.
"We'll all be done for" in The Mutants is also a terrible howler isn't it.

Even if you compare that to the low point in the new series, Peter Kay as Victor Kennedy, at least he is somewhat convincing as Victor even if he is laughably bad as the Abzorbaloff.
What got me about the Abzorbaloff is that Russell T Davies approached it too much as a writer, trying to turn the winning kid's competition drawing into a character. The Abzorbaloff needed to be a huge, sumo-like rampaging monster that absorbed its victims. No more, no less. Kay was very funny with what they did create – I particularly like the faces trying to warn Elton and the one on the Abzorbaloff's backside is muffled because he's sat on a chair!

As for the high points: Tom Baker in Genesis of the Daleks VS probably David Tennant in The Water of Mars, it's definitely David Tennant's performance that comes out on top for me. I just think it's a shame Russell T Davies didn't follow up the Time Lord Victorious in The End of Time until (arguably) the 'So much more!' scene before the farewell tour.
I thought The Waters of Mars was really impressive – the set design was incredible – and the zombie-like victims of the Flood really scary. I hated the ending though and it did colour my attitude to the Tenth Doctor for a while afterwards. I thought he should have gone back to save the crew because he saw it as the right thing to do, not because of his own arrogance. That way it would have been much more shocking and heartbreaking when his good intentions ended in disaster.

I very much liked Matt Smith's performance in Dinosaurs on a Spaceship. I think it's one of the best Doctor stories in the new series because everything that makes the character great is there for Smith to play.



I didn't see all of his last appearance but I liked Bleach because he seems to be doing an homage to all his predecessors really. In his first story what I didn't like was that he was too physical in the chair. Davros shouldn't be Doctor Strangelove, you know? Terry Molloy was great too, and in his audios – Davros especially I think. And David Gooderson had a difficult job and a terrible mask to work under – it looks like they just cut Wisher's old one about a bit to make it fit.
Julian Bleach was definitely a lot better in The Magician's Apprentice/The Witch's Familiar. I think much like the Master Davros works better with a creepier, more sinister performance than a raving lunatic (although I did like Julian Bleach's portrayal in The Stolen Earth/Journey's End too).

"We'll all be done for" in The Mutants is also a terrible howler isn't it.
As bad as Marcus Hammond's 'I can't hold on', though?


What got me about the Abzorbaloff is that Russell T Davies approached it too much as a writer, trying to turn the winning kid's competition drawing into a character. The Abzorbaloff needed to be a huge, sumo-like rampaging monster that absorbed its victims. No more, no less. Kay was very funny with what they did create – I particularly like the faces trying to warn Elton and the one on the Abzorbaloff's backside is muffled because he's sat on a chair!
Peter Kay needed a different role in my opinion. He'd have been great as Malcolm in Planet of the Dead.



I thought The Waters of Mars was really impressive – the set design was incredible – and the zombie-like victims of the Flood really scary. I hated the ending though and it did colour my attitude to the Tenth Doctor for a while afterwards. I thought he should have gone back to save the crew because he saw it as the right thing to do, not because of his own arrogance. That way it would have been much more shocking and heartbreaking when his good intentions ended in disaster.
I disagree, I thought it was a great place to take the 10th Doctor considering earlier episodes had treated him like a mythical God (see Utopia/The Sound of Drums/Last of the Time Lords). It felt like series 2,3 and 4 had all been leading up to this moment, like we'd been prepared ever since the 10th Doctor said 'Barcelona'. It was without a doubt a natural development for this Doctor and allowed David Tennant to give arguably his best performance as 10 before he regenerated.

I very much liked Matt Smith's performance in Dinosaurs on a Spaceship. I think it's one of the best Doctor stories in the new series because everything that makes the character great is there for Smith to play.
Personally, I prefer Matt Smith in The Pandorica Opens/The Big Bang. I can't imagine any other Doctor pulling off the Pandorica speech quite like he did.



The Watch


I want to start off this review by saying The Watch is nowhere near as bad as people make out. Yes, it's not the funniest film and some of the jokes fall flat but I've seen far worse (I'm looking at you, Little Fockers) and it's still a decent enough comedy.

The main problem though is one of the things I mentioned in the first paragraph: some of the jokes are painfully unfunny. Vince Vaughn's lines raised little more than a chuckle from me and surprisingly the same can be said for Ben Stiller's. I don't think this is either actors' fault, it's just that they deserved better material because when they're on form in the film they're funny. It's a shame then that they're not often as funny as you'd like.

Another problem is that Richard Ayoade is badly miscast. He seems completely out of place throughout the film and it's like he was supposed to be filming The IT Crowd but got lost and accidentally ended up on the set of The Watch instead. Matt Smith would have probably been a better choice for the role; he has the 'odd' appearance to pull the character's surprise twist off.

Also, the film just feels like the writers took Ghostbusters and replaced the ghosts with aliens. You've got a local gang taking calls from people in the neighbourhood about strange goings-on, green slime, even an adult version of Peter Venkman. The only thing is it's not as funny as Ghostbusters. And it was never going to be.

So overall, The Watch isn't a bad film but it's not a particularly good comedy either. It's essentially a carbon-copy of Ghostbusters only without Bill Murray; the all-male reboot of Ghostbusters that unlike the mooted Russo Brothers version actually got made.






As bad as Marcus Hammond's 'I can't hold on', though?
I can't remember, probably worse.

Peter Kay needed a different role in my opinion. He'd have been great as Malcolm in Planet of the Dead.
Yeah, that could have worked.

I disagree, I thought it was a great place to take the 10th Doctor considering earlier episodes had treated him like a mythical God (see Utopia/The Sound of Drums/Last of the Time Lords). It felt like series 2,3 and 4 had all been leading up to this moment, like we'd been prepared ever since the 10th Doctor said 'Barcelona'. It was without a doubt a natural development for this Doctor and allowed David Tennant to give arguably his best performance as 10 before he regenerated.
Looking back I think The Girl in the Fireplace is still my favourite of his stories.



Looking back I think The Girl in the Fireplace is still my favourite of his stories.
I love The Girl In The Fireplace and was glad to see the Clockwork Droids return in Deep Breath. Hopefully they'll make another return appearance at some point because it's a great monster concept.



Dimensions In Time review

Dimensions In Time is how NOT to do a multi-Doctor adventure. It has everything that could possibly go wrong with a multi-Doctor story: some of the Doctors don't get enough screentime, the narrative is confusing and almost non-existent, the acting often treads into camp territory and the companions may as well not be there.

It also inexplicably crosses over into EastEnders.

Who the hell wants to see Doctor Who in the same universe as EastEnders?

There's a reason why Tony Stark doesn't pop into The Woolpack or Bruce Wayne doesn't eat a Betty's hotpot in the Rover's. And that reason is because it would look ridiculous.

If there's one good thing about Dimensions In Time, it's that it only lasts fifteen minutes.




I love The Girl In The Fireplace and was glad to see the Clockwork Droids return in Deep Breath. Hopefully they'll make another return appearance at some point because it's a great monster concept.
Were they supposed to be the same type of clockwork droids? I hadn't realised that. I thought Peter Capaldi was at his best in Into the Dalek – I loved that one. Unfortunately I haven't seen him at that high level since, in the few episodes of his I have seen.



Dimensions In Time review

Dimensions In Time is how NOT to do a multi-Doctor adventure. It has everything that could possibly go wrong with a multi-Doctor story: some of the Doctors don't get enough screentime, the narrative is confusing and almost non-existent, the acting often treads into camp territory and the companions may as well not be there.

It also inexplicably crosses over into EastEnders.

Who the hell wants to see Doctor Who in the same universe as EastEnders?

There's a reason why Tony Stark doesn't pop into The Woolpack or Bruce Wayne doesn't eat a Betty's hotpot in the Rover's. And that reason is because it would look ridiculous.

If there's one good thing about Dimensions In Time, it's that it only lasts fifteen minutes.

If you remember they did exactly the same thing with Red Dwarf and Coronation Street. The strange thing is that even in a comedy scenario it was awful and unwanted, because Red Dwarf itself had gone beyond a situation comedy, attaining a developed fictional universe with its own integrity. I feel the same way when an excess of comedy or tongue-in-cheek aspects encroach into Doctor Who, as it did toward the end of Tom Baker's era and at odd times during the new series. If you don't keep that slightly at bay, it's never going to be as effective as it can be when it's taken seriously.



Were they supposed to be the same type of clockwork droids?
They were from the Madame De Pompadour's sister ship the SS Marie Antoinette. Same make, different casing.
I hadn't realised that. I thought Peter Capaldi was at his best in Into the Dalek – I loved that one. Unfortunately I haven't seen him at that high level since, in the few episodes of his I have seen.
I think his speech from Flatline will always be Peter Capaldi's defining moment personally. It felt like the equivalent of 10's Voyage of the Damned speech or 4's 'Do I Have The Right?'.



Guardians of the Galaxy review

Rather fittingly given the main character has never had a chance to move on from the 80s, this movie feels like an 80s film. And like the best films from the 1980s, it has a wonderful feel-good aesthetic. This is largely influenced by the inspired choice to feature 80s music throughout in a neat framing device that the music is being played on Peter Quill's Walkman.

Speaking of Peter Quill, Chris Pratt is brilliant in that role (as expected). Like a hybrid of Marty McFly and Indiana Jones, Pratt's Quill is a cheeky young adventurer with lots of wit and charm. Bradley Cooper's Rocket Racoon is also great, giving an entertaining and often humorous performance.

Oh, and Karen Gillan. Karen Gillan was amazing. I wish she had been the main villain of the film because she was far more convincing as Nebula than Ronan the Accuser. I am so glad Karen Gillan is returning in Guardians of the Galaxy 2 because she is one of my favourite things about the movie.

The film is extremely well-paced throughout. Never a dull moment; no scene too long, no scene too short. Just right. My only criticism of the film is that the dialogue can be pretty quiet in places. Make sure, then, that you're not in a loud place where you may miss parts of the dialogue.

Guardians of the Galaxy is like a brilliant film adaptation of the Fantastic Four if it had been made in the 80s. It may not be Fantastic Four but it feels like what a Fantastic Four film should be.




They were from the Madame De Pompadour's sister ship the SS Marie Antoinette. Same make, different casing.
Ah, got you. They were good in Deep Breath.

I think his speech from Flatline will always be Peter Capaldi's defining moment personally. It felt like the equivalent of 10's Voyage of the Damned speech or 4's 'Do I Have The Right?'.
You see I find the Voyage speech one of the nadirs of the writing – maybe it's because to me it just sounds like a writer trying to sell us the programme rather than a character's natural rhythms?

I love the scene with the Doctor rescuing Journey Blue. That's my favourite Capaldi moment. I also loved Flatline. The Boneless were great (bit like the Nomes in Return to Oz) but having the Doctor give that speech and finish with "And I name you the Boneless" was ridiculous. It's interesting when they give these pages of dialogue to other Doctors at conventions and they dutifully read them out. Paul McGann was interesting with the Flatline speech because his tone of voice, even cold, lent itself to bringing out the horror of what the Boneless were and what they were doing.




I love the scene with the Doctor rescuing Journey Blue. That's my favourite Capaldi moment. I also loved Flatline. The Boneless were great (bit like the Nomes in Return to Oz) but having the Doctor give that speech and finish with "And I name you the Boneless" was ridiculous. It's interesting when they give these pages of dialogue to other Doctors at conventions and they dutifully read them out. Paul McGann was interesting with the Flatline speech because his tone of voice, even cold, lent itself to bringing out the horror of what the Boneless were and what they were doing.
Occasionally you can tell they weren't written for that Doctor though, which occasionally can spoil the thrill of seeing other Doctors give their take.



Occasionally you can tell they weren't written for that Doctor though, which occasionally can spoil the thrill of seeing other Doctors give their take.
I think Sylvester McCoy doing the Pandorica speech was pretty good, and in fact it probably suited him more than Smith. I like the fact that Steven Moffat's tendency towards making the Doctor arrogant and self-publicizing was often undercut by Matt Smith so that his Eleventh Doctor never seemed that way. Paul McGann underplayed those areas of dialogue even more successfully in Night of the Doctor.



I think Sylvester McCoy doing the Pandorica speech was pretty good, and in fact it probably suited him more than Smith. I like the fact that Steven Moffat's tendency towards making the Doctor arrogant and self-publicizing was often undercut by Matt Smith so that his Eleventh Doctor never seemed that way. Paul McGann underplayed those areas of dialogue even more successfully in Night of the Doctor.
Night of the Doctor has to be without a doubt the best minisode for the show so far. Paul McGann's regeneration couldn't have possibly been any better.



Dreamland review

Dreamland has a great premise for a Doctor Who story. So why the three stars?

Well, the animation sucks. It's so bad it makes 60s Scooby Doo cartoons look like they were made in the present day. Cartoon Doctor bears no resemblance to real life David Tennant whatsoever and he walks around as if he's a puppet in a Gerry Anderson show.

I mean, compare David Tennant's look here...:



...to David Tennant's real life appearance:



How the animators could think it even bears a close resemblance to David Tennant beats me.

Fortunately, it is saved from being a disaster by the excellent voice acting and brilliant narrative. David Tennant is on top form as usual and Georgia Moffett is brilliant as Cassie Rice. Writer Phil Ford has also done a brilliant job, with some great pieces of dialogue throughout. I'd love to know the decision to use a American setting though.

You've got absolutely no limitations with locations for animation...and they opt for America?

Why not a distant planet that would be difficult to realise on-screen? Or a time period that would require lots of expensive SFX such as the prehistoric era?

Dreamland is a big missed opportunity and it's a shame the animation wasn't better to support a great narrative and voice-acting by those involved.