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I'm currently living on zero dollars a week. Take that you, Richies! And I have a ****ing horse to feed.
Takes about $3-5K a year to maintain a horse, right?



Takes about $3-5K a year to maintain a horse, right?

Closer to 10K. Not including vets and farriers. Or the endless supplies of apples.


*Canadian currency



Registered User
Closer to 10K. Not including vets and farriers. Or the endless supplies of apples.


*Canadian currency

This is the part of the slaughter house debate that I don't get. If you can afford to own a horse, why can't you afford to euthanize it by spending $250-300? Why do you need to have a slaughter house pay you a comparable amount to make humanely disposing of a sick animal economically viable? What am I missing on the economics of the situ that people just let horses suffer and die rather than euthanize them at the vet? I've got to be missing something here, because I've met a lot of horse owners who are pro-slaughter house.



This is the part of the slaughter house debate that I don't get. If you can afford to own a horse, why can't you afford to euthanize it by spending $250-300? Why do you need to have a slaughter house pay you a comparable amount to make humanely disposing of a sick animal economically viable? What am I missing on the economics of the situ that people just let horses suffer and die rather than euthanize them at the vet? I've got to be missing something here, because I've met a lot of horse owners who are pro-slaughter house.

I don't know anything about this 'slaughterhouse debate'. All I know of the stable where our horse is kept is that any horse that has been put down has been done so with vets. I'm not surprised that this is something other horse owners do though as many are, how shall I say it...of a particular type. ie. entitled **** heads.



Technically the horse is my gf's, so I'm fairly new (two years) to all of the intricacies of equine care. All I know is it is patently ridiculously for two people who would clearly be qualified as being 'working poor', to have a ****ing horse. It's a fun little bon mot to bring up at parties though (lol at me actually going to a party)



What does this phrase mean? What is the tenor of this vehicle? What speech act is being performed here?
You see, thereís rich people.


And we eat them.



I'm currently living on zero dollars a week. Take that you, Richies! And I have a ****ing horse to feed.
Iíve got this idea about what to feed your horse.

WARNING: spoilers below
Itís the rich.



You see, thereís rich people.


And we eat them.
Thank you. I was worried you were speaking in metaphors, which would have been too confusing.



I still have you beat I'm still poorer! Wait a minute why am I proud about that??? Never mind
While there may be a range here, I don't think that any of us are in "Spend millions of dollars at a gallery" territory. (And honestly, it also depends on where you live. $10 goes a lot further in small town Iowa than it does in Boston, let me tell you!)



Thank you. I was worried you were speaking in metaphors, which would have been too confusing.
I know writers who use subtext, and theyíre all cowards!





Colossal, 2016

Maybe my third or fourth viewing? I really dig this film. It's a movie where the plot turns are just as likely to be about who characters really are than what's happening with the monster, and where the real horror is psychological. Great performances from Hathaway and Sudeikis.








SF = Z


[Snooze Factor Ratings]:
Z = didn't nod off at all
Zz = nearly nodded off but managed to stay alert
Zzz = nodded off and missed some of the film but went back to watch what I missed
Zzzz = nodded off and missed some of the film but went back to watch what I missed but nodded off again at the same point and therefore needed to go back a number of times before I got through it...
Zzzzz = nodded off and missed some or the rest of the film but was not interested enough to go back over it



Licorice Pizza - Definitely an odd one. It's sort of a love story, would be a teen love story except that while the boy is 15, his love interest is 25, not a teen. A lot of things happen in a stream of consciousness sort of narrative sequence. It's written and directed by Paul Thomas Anderson, so it's not going to be conventional.

The boy, Gary, is played by Cooper Hoffman the son of the late Philip Seymour Hoffman. His appearance and gestures often mirror his father. The "girl" is played by Alana Haim, who has no movie experience, but is actually a musician.

Gary goes through several careers during the movie, although is mainly a waterbed huckster (it's set in 1973). Without any evidence, Gary is arrested for murder and then released shortly later.

Alana is a photographer's assistant.

Jon Peters, the one time partner of Barbra Streisand, buys a waterbed from Gary, who proceeds to leave the hose running in Peter's and Streisand's house.

Alana works for a candidate's mayoral campaign, a guy with a secret.

Sean Penn and Tom Waits show up as eccentric characters.

Just try to tie all this together. It's not easy, but it works fairly well if you have a loose idea of continuity. I enjoyed it in its strange way.




11 Foreign Language movies to go

By Georges Kerfyser / Columbia (France)

Sundays and Cybele - (1962)

It took me a full viewing to come to the opinion that Sundays and Cybele is a delightful, magical and beautiful film. It took me that long to really get to know Hardy KrŁger's Pierre, and understand just how damaged, vulnerable and child-like he really was - not to mention good-hearted and decent, despite at times becoming violent. Pierre meets young girl Cybele as she's being shuffled to an orphanage and being abandoned by her father and there an enduring and deep-felt friendship evolves with Pierre taking Cybele for walks every Sunday. Pierre is being cared for by a nurse after becoming psychologically damaged in battle, and this nurse has started a relationship with him. His girlfriend and adult friends become an unsettling fracture in his world when they endanger his relationship with Cybele - and with Cybele's love for Pierre growing, both the world he inhabits and the viewer become a little unsettled as to what boundaries and openness there should or shouldn't be. Beautifully filmed, with enduring performances from KrŁger and young Patricia Gozzi, this was pure cinematic heaven and I loved every minute of it.

9/10

Foreign Language Countdown films seen : 66/100


By IMDB - https://www.imdb.com/title/tt8075192/, Fair use, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=57108920

Shoplifters - (2018)

By the end of Shoplifters you'll really be asking yourself what truly makes a family. This Japanese film captures modern-day Japan and gives us a rare glimpse into the life of a family in poverty there - one that makes do and doesn't think twice about breaking the rules, but still has a strong heart and moral core. They have stronger morals and greater love than others who love less but follow the rules, which makes the entire system feel suspect and heartless. It's just one point of view, but it's strongly communicated by allowing us to feel the bonds these disparate 'family' members have for each other and witness what they share. Another emotionally engaging and heartfelt film - very down to earth, but at the same time unusual and thoughtful. It took some time, and the film needed to, but by the end I liked it a great deal.

8/10

Foreign Language Countdown films seen : 67/100
__________________
My movie ratings often go up or down a point or two after more reflection, research and rewatches.

Latest Review : Miracle Mile (1988)



Bright light. Bright light. Uh oh.

Chicago Syndicate (Fred F. Sears, 1955)
+ 6/10
Let the Summer Never Come Again (Aleksandre Koberidze, 2017)
3/10
Night Train to Memphis (Lesley Selander, 1945)
5.5/10
WarGames (John Badham, 1983)
7+/10

Joshua learns about the futility of war.
Doctor Death: Seeker of Souls (Eddie Saeta, 1973)
5/10
King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table (Jared Cohn, 2017)
+ 4.5/10
A Life of Her Own (George Cukor, 1950)
5.5/10
The Sandlot (David Mickey Evans, 1993)
- 7/10

Cute kids sports comedy turns more significant with a series of meaningful closing scenes.
What About Me (Rachel Amodeo, 1993)
5.5/10
The Tiger Woman (Philip Ford, 1945)
5/10
The Mark of the Hawk (Michael Audley, 1957)
6/10
Ghostbusters: Afterlife (Jason Reitman, 2021)
- 6.5/10

The kids of a former ghostbuster follow in his footsteps to defeat Gozer.
What Do We See When We Look at the Sky? (Aleksandre Koberidze, 2021)
5/10
iGilbert (Adrian Martinez, 2021)
6-/10
Bad Medicine (Harvey Miller, 1985)
+ 5/10
Un flic (Jean-Pierre Melville, 1972)
6/10

Why is Catherine Deneuve taking the gun of her part-time lover Alain Delon? Is it because of her other lover, Richard Crenna?
Last Words (Jonathan Nossiter, 2020)
6/10
Salvation!: Have You Said Your Prayers Today? (Beth B, 1987)
5.5/10
Thunder Bay (Anthony Mann, 1953)
6/10
Rock 'n' Roll High School (Allan Arkush & Joe Dante, 1979)
- 7/10

The Ramones invade the room of their real #1 fan, Riff Randell (P.J. Soles).
__________________
It's what you learn after you know it all that counts. - John Wooden
My IMDb page



Better Living Through Movie Quotes
RE: "Eat The Rich"

What does this phrase mean? What is the tenor of this vehicle? What speech act is being performed here?
Just that cannibals are people too...





Barravento, 1962

Firmino (Antonio Pitanga) returns to his native island after spending time away in the city. Once home, he is agitated by what he sees as the community's passiveness in the face of oppression and their use of magical rituals. These social dynamics get tangled up in complicated romantic friction as Firmino grows increasingly jealous of Arua (Aldo Teixeira), a strapping young fisherman who is considered to be blessed by the goddess of the sea. Firmino is interested in both Cota (Luiza Maranhao) and Naina (Lucy de Carvalho).

This was a film that I enjoyed more and more as it went on.

Initially, as I was watching the story unfold, I was sort of grousing to myself that the film was being muddled about the point that it was trying to make. Are the rituals of the people on the island (singing as they haul in nets, dancing in the moonlight) meant to be joyful? Or are they meant to represent an ignorant way of life that allows them to be exploited for their labor? Are the magical rituals meant, likewise, to show ignorance, or are they meant to show a connection between the people and the powerful natural forces that govern their survival?

But around a third of the way into the film, I realized that the "muddle" is the point. The answer is not necessarily one or the other. And part of the point is that even the most pure ideals and convictions are subject to corruption by human emotion.

The central expression of this is Firmino's destructive relationship with Arua. Both of them are smart, charismatic young men who could be powerful if their forces were combined. But instead Firmino allows himself to indulge in a hatred of his rival. He attempts to use a magical ritual to drown Arua, dismissing the magical rituals as nonsense after it fails to kill of Arua. Likewise, there is something about Arua that goes right up to the edge of the difference between magic and the magic of belief. Is Arua actually blessed by the ocean god? It certainly seems that way. But in addition to bringing in a good haul of fish, this blessing also takes the form of the confidence of the other villagers. It keeps them from despair when their net is ripped and eventually taken away by the man who employs them.

A story centered almost entirely on the lower class can run the risk of suggesting that they are mostly or entirely at fault for their own condition. That if they'd just stop holding their silly beliefs in magic and sea gods, they could be more successful and independent. Because we only see one interaction between the islanders and their employer----a sequence in which he hauls their net away with the assistance of armed guards---the only thing seen holding them back from financial stability is their own in-fighting and decisions. While there are clearly some implications that in-fighting or jealousy can sabotage collective action, it seems pretty clear to me that midnight dances and the occasional magic ritual aren't why the people on the island are poor.

There was also a subplot around Naina and her father, and also with Naina and the women running the magical rituals. I will admit that I didn't totally follow the thread of this piece of the film. I was unsure about the implications---perhaps that she had been fathered by a white man because of her skin color?--and if anyone else has seen this film and has thoughts, I'd love to hear them.

I will also mention (because I appreciate when others mention), that there is some unsimulated animal death in this movie, in the form a close up of chickens being killed in one of the rituals.

A really interesting film that had not been on my radar previously.





Where Is the Friend's Home? (1987, Abbas Kiarostami)


A film of luminous realism and humanity. There's a halo of truth and childhood innocence hovering over every frame and piece of dialogue — it almost feels like watching a documentary. While we spend most of the film seeing things from the boy's perspective, Kiarostami sneaks in a couple of moments where the point of view shifts and we get a glimpse of the adult perception of reality, touching upon themes of modernity vs tradition, progress, urbanization, etc. A brilliant, touching film.