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SF = Z


[Snooze Factor Ratings]:
Z = didn't nod off at all
Zz = nearly nodded off but managed to stay alert
Zzz = nodded off and missed some of the film but went back to watch what I missed
Zzzz = nodded off and missed some of the film but went back to watch what I missed but nodded off again at the same point and therefore needed to go back a number of times before I got through it...
Zzzzz = nodded off and missed some or the rest of the film but was not interested enough to go back over it



When the Cat Comes 1963 Inventive and entertaining with style and substance. I loved the use of colour in the film. The magical cat with the cool shades is fantastic. Kitty should have gotten more screen time.



Noirs I watched today:

Roadblock 1951 A decent film noir. Nothing exceptional, but it is alright.


Repeat Performance 1947 The year repeating element feels like a gimmick and doesn't really fit with the film. It isn't necessary and they don't do enough with it to justify it. Performances are fine and there is some good drama, but I personally wouldn't consider this a film noir.


I Wouldnít Be in Your Shoes 1948 This was a pleasant surprise. Directed by William Nigh, the film stars Don Castle, Elyse Knox, and Regis Toomey. Around Christmastime, a dancer is falsely accused of murder and his wife desperately tries to prove his innocence. Good performances from the leads and an interesting, well written screenplay make this an enjoyable film noir. Watched on the Criterion Channel.



May December (2023) Directed by Todd Haynes. Starring Julianne Moore, Natalie Portman, and Charles Melton. This is a very well written film with a trio of strong performances and powerful moments. Good score too. Currently my 8th favourite film of the year. Watched on Netflix.







SF = Z


Oooo a lot of fun.



[Snooze Factor Ratings]:
Z = didn't nod off at all
Zz = nearly nodded off but managed to stay alert
Zzz = nodded off and missed some of the film but went back to watch what I missed
Zzzz = nodded off and missed some of the film but went back to watch what I missed but nodded off again at the same point and therefore needed to go back a number of times before I got through it...
Zzzzz = nodded off and missed some or the rest of the film but was not interested enough to go back over it



Extinction (2018)


A family man keeps having visions and nightmares of an off-world invasion, soon the visions turn into a reality when spacecrafts appear in the sky. I enjoyed this and the twist was mind bending, some of the CGI was pretty terrible but I could look past that



I forgot the opening line.

By https://images.mymovies.net/images/f...7/fid21198.jpg, Fair use, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=68850079

Operation Mincemeat - (2021)

Okay - historical film time, and I'm pulled in two different directions. Learning about history is fun, but I also have to add that learning about history directly from films is a no-no because they manipulate the facts to make for a better story. The movie should be an inspiration to go seek out the real true story. Operation Mincemeat has that element of fun to it. But man - there's a flatness to historical films these days as well. Something a little mundane. Anyway, this is about the operation to float a corpse off the coast of Spain during World War II with papers on it that will fool the Nazis into thinking the Allies will invade Greece instead of Sicily. There's a lot of "eww" to that. They try to take a nice pic to include in his papers, but only end up with corpse face. Eww. He goes more and more rotten as the planning proceeds. Eww. We get to see some of the autopsy by the Spanish authorities, of this green, blown-up, rotten thing. Ewwww. So much corpse in this movie. Then there's Ian Fleming...

Ian Fleming (Johnny Flynn) was one of the planners of this operation, and the movie keeps making as much of that as it possibly can. For example, Charles Cholmondeley (Matthew Macfadyen) keeps saying "Everyone is a writer these days!" while Fleming is around, and at one point accosts him directly about how he's sick of everyone writing novels. Because we, the audience, are meant to go "Ha ha! Ian Fleming will write the James Bond novels!" Yes. We get it. And it goes on and on. Hints here, there and everywhere. Then, once the operation is underway, we see Ian Fleming at a typewriter and he's asked "What are you doing??" and he answers "I'm writing a spy novel!" We're meant to be thinking "Oh my God! He's been inspired to create James Bond!" Too overt movie. Too overt. And I thought just mentioning his name was a little too much.

This was okay - a decent movie about a devious deception that saved lives during World War II. I don't think it had an effect on the course of the whole war - not as much as the movie wants you to think it did - but it saved lives and it's interesting to see how it worked in detail.

6/10
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Bad Timing (1980, Nicolas Roeg)

In the hands of a less original, less ambitious director, this dark tale of lust and obsession would probably have ended up becoming a fairly unremarkable conventional psychological drama inhabited by nasty, flawed characters. Thankfully, Nicolas Roeg's imaginative visuals and virtuoso editing techniques coupled with his non-linear approach to storytelling elevated it into something completely different and totally engrossing. I love his ability to jump back and forth in time and memory, picking out and highlighting various minute details and nuancesódisorienting at first, but gradually it all falls into place as you get used to the language (Tarkovsky's "mosaic made of time" quite literally). There is a decadent, subversive feel to the filmóviscerally carnal yet powerfully cerebral at the same timeóincreasingly veering into disturbing territory as it nears its shocking final revelation. Loved the contrast between the two leads too, Art Garfunkel as the cold, possessive control freak and Theresa Russell (terrific performance!) as the wild, unpredictable, promiscuous Milena.
Brilliant film, very underrated!




By https://images.mymovies.net/images/f...7/fid21198.jpg, Fair use, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=68850079

Operation Mincemeat - (2021)

Okay - historical film time, and I'm pulled in two different directions. Learning about history is fun, but I also have to add that learning about history directly from films is a no-no because they manipulate the facts to make for a better story. The movie should be an inspiration to go seek out the real true story. Operation Mincemeat has that element of fun to it. But man - there's a flatness to historical films these days as well. Something a little mundane. Anyway, this is about the operation to float a corpse off the coast of Spain during World War II with papers on it that will fool the Nazis into thinking the Allies will invade Greece instead of Sicily. There's a lot of "eww" to that. They try to take a nice pic to include in his papers, but only end up with corpse face. Eww. He goes more and more rotten as the planning proceeds. Eww. We get to see some of the autopsy by the Spanish authorities, of this green, blown-up, rotten thing. Ewwww. So much corpse in this movie. Then there's Ian Fleming...

Ian Fleming (Johnny Flynn) was one of the planners of this operation, and the movie keeps making as much of that as it possibly can. For example, Charles Cholmondeley (Matthew Macfadyen) keeps saying "Everyone is a writer these days!" while Fleming is around, and at one point accosts him directly about how he's sick of everyone writing novels. Because we, the audience, are meant to go "Ha ha! Ian Fleming will write the James Bond novels!" Yes. We get it. And it goes on and on. Hints here, there and everywhere. Then, once the operation is underway, we see Ian Fleming at a typewriter and he's asked "What are you doing??" and he answers "I'm writing a spy novel!" We're meant to be thinking "Oh my God! He's been inspired to create James Bond!" Too overt movie. Too overt. And I thought just mentioning his name was a little too much.

This was okay - a decent movie about a devious deception that saved lives during World War II. I don't think it had an effect on the course of the whole war - not as much as the movie wants you to think it did - but it saved lives and it's interesting to see how it worked in detail.

6/10

Good review, it confirm my doubts really and I knew of this true story for a long time and I didn't think it merited an entire film, as soon as I heard it was being made into one I inwardly sighed tbh.



DESPERATE SOULS, DARK CITY AND THE LEGEND OF MIDNIGHT COWBOY

There was little "Midnight Cowboy" (about 90 seconds of a new Jon Voigt interview interspersed) with a lot of other extracurricular shit.


I want to see this. What a terrific film.



matt72582's Avatar
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I want to see this. What a terrific film.

This was one of my favorite movies in my first year of being serious about movies at 17 and 18 and enjoyed it when I saw it a couple of years ago.



Over The Top (1987)


Someone give me a baseball cap, I need to turn it around now. The quintessential arm wrestling pic, five stars for the soundtrack alone.



I forgot the opening line.

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Hush... Hush, Sweet Charlotte - (1964)

Well, this was certainly different. After the success director Robert Aldrich and screenwriter Lukas Heller had adapting Henry Farrell's What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?, they had a stab at another, this one based on "What Ever Happened to Cousin Charlotte?" Of course the tone is similar - everyone is back and that includes Bette Davis as nutty old dame Charlotte. The only real dropout is Joan Crawford, who did start, but was replaced by Olivia de Havilland and shooting had to start from scratch. This one is a little more haunting than Baby Jane - it begins with a prologue set in 1927, with Charlotte's wealthy Southern daddy and patriarch Big Sam (Victor Buono) chewing out her already-married boyfriend (who was soon to elope with her), John Mayhew (a really young Bruce Dern.) Mayhew is forced to break it off with Charlotte, and for his trouble he's attacked with a meat cleaver, which chops off his hand and his head. Friday the 13th was a while away, but oh boy - I was surprised how gory that was. Flip over to the present day, and Charlotte (Bette Davis) is an eccentric recluse - seemingly in denial of what happened back then. Unfortunately, her house has been bought by the government for the construction of a highway bridge, but she's refusing to go.

Alright - so obviously the story is interesting if I'm basically telling it blow by blow. Olivia de Havilland is Charlotte's Cousin, Miriam Deering - she arrives to help persuade her to leave, and she's the one who, as a child, told Charlotte's father about her affair with a married man. Then there's Charlotte's doctor and Miriam's past love interest Doctor Drew Bayliss (the always enjoyable Joseph Cotten). Agnes Moorehead, Mary Astor, Cecil Kellaway and George Kennedy round out the cast. The gruesome death of Mayhew hangs over the events in this film like a ghostly fog (his hand and head were never found) - and that's the aspect of Sweet Charlotte I liked best. I also enjoyed Betty's crazy, rambunctious performance, which unfortunately has to compete with Agnes Moorehead's equally shouty, off-the-wall turn (she's Velma, the housekeeper.) The Oscar nominated song, "Hush...Hush, Sweet Charlotte" is so good I assumed it was a well known Southern song - it doesn't leave you once the film is over. It haunts you. The story twists and turns and stays interesting, and the movie is well shot - so it's a worthy addition to anyone's Bette Davis collection.

7.5/10



Wish (2023)


This one started off a bit too generic (and the animation style felt dated), but it develops into a reasonably good story that my daughter loved. I'm not sure why it seems to be getting so much negative criticism, because it follows the standard plotline for fairy tales well. I laughed several times, and I thought this world setting was actually pretty fascinating. Better than Elemental in my opinion.



'May December' (2023)

"Twenty years after their notorious tabloid romance gripped the nation, a married couple buckles under pressure when an actress arrives to do research for a film about their past."

I need to collect my thoughts after this one but it's definitely in the top few films of the year. It's a calculating, cold psychological drama that creeps up on the viewer and leaves some very interesting questions in their head.

Moore, Portman and Melton are all terrific. Haynes' directing and use of mirrors / symmetry is great and he seems to channel his inner Bergman at times, specifically 'Persona'.

Lots of symbolism with graduation and the metamorphosis of butterflies. I went in to this film completely blind and was left feeling extremely rewarded.

8.1/10