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Thanks! I caught it on TCM, but I think it's on VOD, streaming services, etc.

Just curious, when De Palma's movies were in theaters, was he a big draw like a Nolan or a Spielberg movie? Were they more of a curiosity like David Lynch's work? I've watched 99% of his movies at home.
Well, I do remember his name being mentioned in ads and reviews but that was a different time.



I don't think of Travolta as ever being a "good" actor he's always a leading man. His job in his best work is to tell the story and to make the character actors around him look better.

His best work (A Civil Action, The Generals Daughter, Pulp Fiction, Swordfish, Get Shorty, Taking of Pelham 123 and Face Off) he's not the great actor it's the character actors around him and the story.
I don't disagree with you... except for Saturday Night Fever, Urban Cowboy, and Blow Out, all of which seem to be the work of a young force to be reckoned with. And then what the hell happens? Suddenly you get all those movies you named. And then all the ones you were kind enough (to him) not to.



Whoops! We've gotten the wokesters upset. We'll have to be more careful...
Umm, I don't think there's a "we" here. When I said, "I can see that" I meant that I understood the studio was thinking of the bottom line. It in no way makes it right though. And that they specifically wrote in his dismissal at the end of Lina's very real fear as just another hysterical female overreacting makes it even worse. But it most certainly was a crappy ending and Johnnie a despicable character.



He also out-Cages Cage in Face/Off. He'll always have my respect for that.


This whole scene is ****ing genius
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I don't disagree with you... except for Saturday Night Fever, Urban Cowboy, and Blow Out, all of which seem to be the work of a young force to be reckoned with. And then what the hell happens? Suddenly you get all those movies you named. And then all the ones you were kind enough (to him) not to.
While I think Travolta will never be confused with Daniel Day Lewis in terms of acting veracity, I think he’s very good if not great.

I think even in works like the Fanatic, where the performance is absolutely wrong for the film it is in, it’s a “bad” performance that takes a great deal of talent to even do.

I think part of the problem is that Travolta’s eccentric personal life has taken a bit of a toll on his acting life and he’s become increasingly more unbelievable for “normal roles.”

I really enjoyed his flamboyant performance in the People vs. OJ Simpson and would like to see much more in that vein and far less like Gotti (in which I’d argue, he still gives a serviceable performance despite the film being utterly lifeless)



Ah, this movie. Tried to do for country what Saturday Night Fever did for disco. Is it as successful? Not really, but it's got a fun location to hang out in, and Scott Glenn is ****ing great it in.


WARNING: spoilers below
I actually wish they didn't turn Glenn into a heel at the end. He's got a very different kind of masculinity than Travolta, would have been nice to see them bond eventually.



Also, he dropped out of the movie, but he is responsible for Giorgio Armani's involvement in American Gigolo, which is one of THE menswear movies. Those big, soft-shouldered suits... *chef's kiss*



Welcome to the human race...
You can't be serious.
Bruh, I've got an Escape From L.A. avatar. This should not be surprising.
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I love this film so much. Emotionally-driven sci-fi is my favorite kind of sci-fi. I also think it's gorgeous.
It's interesting that you say that, since I found the more emotional/dramatic material in Annihilation to be slightly underwhelming, in particular the revelation that Portman's character
WARNING: spoilers below
had an affair, which felt like it occurred in a bit of an emotional vacuum, since it didn't feel like it really offered as much insight into or affected the overall perception of her character as much as it was meant to.
Come to think of it, the movie sort of makes for an unintentional trilogy with A Quiet Place & Hereditary, as 2018 Horror movies with somewhat flawed dramatic elements in them (as much as I'm still obviously a fan of the former). Still, the Sci-Fi/Horror aspects of it were enough to make it a good film on the whole, despite all that.



Whoops! We've gotten the wokesters upset. We'll have to be more careful...
You think we're being "woke" for criticizing Suspicion for not having the husband try to kill the wife?





Welcome to the human race...
At this point, I'm pretty sure his avatar is a pic of him getting his brain fried to the point where he posts like this.





The Divided Heart (1954)
Directed by Charles Crichton

Realistic and heart-wrenching drama about how the tragedy of war adversely affects people's lives. When a three year old boy is found alone in Germany during WW2, he is placed in an orphanage when it is assumed that the rest of his family is missing or dead. Eventually he comes to be adopted by a German couple who provide him with a loving home. Seven years later after the war has ended it is found that the boy's natural mother has survived as a refugee in Yugoslavia, and now wishes to claim her son, leading to an emotional moral dilemma.

One of the things I really liked about this film was its straight-forwardness in presenting the facts without taking sides or casting judgement on anyone. All the principle characters are sensitively portrayed with humanity and understandable motivations, who must evaluate these whilst considering the boy's own future and the understanding of his past. It's a powerfully accurate statement on the tragic aftermath of human conflict and the reality of how many lives were displaced.

It's extremely well written and directed, with the black and white cinematography particularly outstanding. For their fine performances, Yvonne Mitchell won the British Film Award for Best Actress, and Cornell Borchers as Best Foreign Actress.

9/10



before sunrise - 8/10



It's interesting that you say that, since I found the more emotional/dramatic material in Annihilation to be slightly underwhelming, in particular the revelation that Portman's character
WARNING: spoilers below
had an affair, which felt like it occurred in a bit of an emotional vacuum, since it didn't feel like it really offered as much insight into or affected the overall perception of her character as much as it was meant to.
Come to think of it, the movie sort of makes for an unintentional trilogy with A Quiet Place & Hereditary, as 2018 Horror movies with somewhat flawed dramatic elements in them (as much as I'm still obviously a fan of the former). Still, the Sci-Fi/Horror aspects of it were enough to make it a good film on the whole, despite all that.
It's not the fact of
WARNING: spoilers below
the affair
that is meant to hit hard, in my opinion. It's the idea that it has changed the relationship between the two of them. And then you layer in the sci-fi element that they might literally NOT be the same people.

I know I've linked this video essay like 8 times on this site, so apologies to those of you who are like "IS SHE LINKING THAT FOLDING IDEAS VIDEO AGAIN?!?!?!?!", but it really does sum up what I love about the film.





The File on Thelma Jordon (1949)

This is a must-see noir, if for no other reason than for it was directed by one of the very greatest noir directors, Robert Siodmak (The Killers, Criss Cross, Phantom Lady).

An unusual title (hard to remember), it stars Barbara Stanwyck and Wendell Corey. The story bears more than a passing resemblance to Double Indemnity, done 5 years earlier. Story writer Marty Holland (Fallen Angel) and screenwriter Ketti Frings (Come Back Little Sheba) had to have patterned their writing on Messrs. Caine, Wilder and Chandler's superb earlier film.

Stanwyck plays another rotten femme fatale, who in this story manipulates an assistant D.A. (Corey) into defending her against the murder of her aunt, thought to be murdered by her secret husband.

This, along with Rear Window, is Corey's finest work. He always seemed limited in scope, but in the right role, such as this one, no one could have done it better.

George Barnes' (Jane Eyre, Spellbound) moody photography demonstrates how a noir ought to be lit. If you haven't seen this premier noir, it's available for free on the Internet Archive or YouTube.

Doc's rating: 7/10



Deep


10/10



I don't think i've ever seen a thai movie before








The Most Dangerous Game - 1932

Ah, one of the first old films I seen, it must have been 20 years ago. I remember thinking it was much like the movie pilot for Fantasy Island. Good film.