Watching Movies Alone with crumbsroom

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Hey crumbs, do you have an account over on Kateland? Because I couldn't help notice that someone there just gave you a lil' namedrop...



Abbey Road has consistently been near the bottom of my Beatles list since, for lack of a better word, forever. I would rank some of their early stuff below it, but when it comes to the meat of their career, I've always preferred Revolver, Help, Hard Day's Night, Rubber Soul, Sgt. Pepper, White Album, Magical Mystery Tour, and even pseudo State-side riff raff compilations like Hey Jude or Yesterday and Today. It only has three tracks I love (Something, Here Comes the Sun, I Want You). Its first side only has 5 songs, two of which are my all time least favorite (Maxwell, Octopus), and (as discussed) its big opener, kind of a middle of the road 'big song' for me. This of course leaves the big medley at the end, which as a piece of studio wizardry is justifiably loved, and that I sort of love as well, but as individual pieces, only small segments really resonate with me.



Now, I get why other people rank Abbey Road highly. It's their slickest album, and yet another evolution in their sound, and possibly some of their most mature songwriting. But as I was just listening to Let it Be the other day (which I always had ranked below it before), I started wondering why I think worse of it, when I like to love virtually every track on it, while I hardly have even the slightest interest of every putting Abbey Road on. Frankly, I think the only song on Let It Be I don't like is Get Back. But that at least has Billy Preston on it. So it doesn't kill.


As is probably well known with my movie taste, this often translates into what I prefer in music. I don't like all the rough ends sanded off. I don't like things being tinkered with in the name of perfection. And that's kind of Abbey Road in a nutshell.
I think where we differ is that I don't agree with your assessment of the album, Abbey Road. I would not have thought of the word "slick" to describe it nor do I feel like all the rough edges are sanded off. And I don't hate Maxwell or Octopus. So, we just have different perspectives altogether.



minds his own damn business
Hey crumbs, do you have an account over on Kateland? Because I couldn't help notice that someone there just gave you a lil' namedrop...
Would you like to stand in front of the class and read your note aloud to everyone?
__________________



minds his own damn business
A musical interlude between stills of Suburban Sasquatch
Good to see you on the Prine train.


Say, did you ever get around to checking out Van's Common One?


I'm wanting to grab his new one, but it's supposed to be a bit of a protest against the pandemic lockdowns. At least that's what Armond White says, and for whatever reason he interpreted Rough and Rowdy Ways as pro-Trump, which I'm not at all convinced of. I mean, Van's always been a bit crazy, but also interesting, so I figure it's worth a spin.



minds his own damn business
My controversial Beatle hot take for the day: Mr. Moonlight >>> Nowhere Man. And I will bite and scratch.



Hey crumbs, do you have an account over on Kateland? Because I couldn't help notice that someone there just gave you a lil' namedrop...

Well, if I'm going to ever be known for anything, it clearly is going to be for that. And I do hope along with my Conjuring mehness, this was being folded into my actual hatred of American Horror Story (excluding Asylum, which is pretty amazingly awesome garbage)



I think where we differ is that I don't agree with your assessment of the album, Abbey Road. I would not have thought of the word "slick" to describe it nor do I feel like all the rough edges are sanded off. And I don't hate Maxwell or Octopus. So, we just have different perspectives altogether.

If Abbey Road isn't an example of highly polished rock and roll, I have no idea what would constitute. It is super slick. It is meticulously mixed and put together. It was maybe going too far to say all of the rough edges have been cut off (the competing guitar solo's on The Ends outro, the growing rumble and sudden end of I Want You, the vocals of Come Together), but generally the whole album is a glistening diamond of studio production. Which isn't, by default, any kind of inherently bad thing.



And, for the record, I don't hate any Beatles songs (at least not any originals). Some leave me pretty cold, and some I think are frivolous throw aways. And Maxwell and Octopus would be considered on that scale of underwhelmness. So when an album's first side is 50 percent lesser work in my eyes, were not off to a good start when looking at all of their other records.



Good to see you on the Prine train.


Say, did you ever get around to checking out Van's Common One?


I'm wanting to grab his new one, but it's supposed to be a bit of a protest against the pandemic lockdowns. At least that's what Armond White says, and for whatever reason he interpreted Rough and Rowdy Ways as pro-Trump, which I'm not at all convinced of. I mean, Van's always been a bit crazy, but also interesting, so I figure it's worth a spin.

Sweet Revenge is the only one I got so far, since it was the only one I could find fairly affordably online at the time. I like it.


I've had Common Ground for a couple of years, ever since reading his biography. I think it should arguably be considered amongst his better work, and the mostly dreadful reviews I read before I ever got around to listening to it myself, sort of baffle me.



I believe Pitchfork also considered his newest as being anti lockdown, but him having that kind of stance is hardly surprising to me. He's a prick and he doesn't like people telling him what to do. Seems pretty fitting. But as much as I'm tired of dealing with those kinds of people in my real life, I couldn't care less what Morrison thinks, and would have no issue giving it a go (even though I haven't heard any of his material past the 80's, he's a guy I would probably welcome anything by into my collection. he's earned carte blanche at this point)



minds his own damn business
I've had Common Ground for a couple of years, ever since reading his biography. I think it should arguably be considered amongst his better work, and the mostly dreadful reviews I read before I ever got around to listening to it myself, sort of baffle me.
It's almost certainly his best since Veedon Fleece, and my favorite of his from the 80s.


I believe Pitchfork also considered his newest as being anti lockdown, but him having that kind of stance is hardly surprising to me. He's a prick and he doesn't like people telling him what to do. Seems pretty fitting. But as much as I'm tired of dealing with those kinds of people in my real life, I couldn't care less what Morrison thinks, and would have no issue giving it a go (even though I haven't heard any of his material past the 80's, he's a guy I would probably welcome anything by into my collection. he's earned carte blanche at this point)
Yeah, jeesh, those reviews are harsh. Now I feel like I gotta hear it. I think Van's rationale against the lockdowns is faciley selfish, as it shut down his plans to tour in 2020, and boohoo, big guy. But, damn, how can I not hear an album with a Van Morrison song called "Why Are You On Facebook?"



Vinyl copies of Lately, I Keep Scissors and Marjory Razorblade in my mailbox, both in one week, almost makes up for the fact that the government has enlisted me for underpaid secret service work, knocking on doors and having beer bottles thrown at my head.



Thank you internet!



And, yes, I am one of the ******** in the red vests.


I imagine most of us have black eyes by now.
Oooooooh..... that must be who was ringing the doorbell so many times yesterday.


I didn't throw any beer bottles. I just didn't bother answering the door.



Oooooooh..... that must be who was ringing the doorbell so many times yesterday.


I didn't throw any beer bottles. I just didn't bother answering the door.

You have no idea what a relief it is when no one comes to the door.


But, that just means I have to return. So it should probably make me angry. But it doesn't. Because I know I wouldn't either.