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Shame you didn't enjoy it, FB. I love Psychomania. I love the mix of British 70's vibe (and mean as you say) with the campy PG violence and horror. I really like the bitterness to it, too. The mother tries to protect her son and he just uses and abuses it, wrecking everything for them both. Much as I feel that generation felt their kids were doing to the country and freedom they fought for.
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By The cover art can or could be obtained from IMP Awards or Sony Pictures Classics., Fair use, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=31219010

Midnight in Paris - (2011)

Saw this when it came out, and thought it was quite good - despite me turning sour on a lot of the films a certain ex-girlfriend of mine used to love. This one still holds up. Owen Wilson is the Woody surrogate this time around, as he finds himself transported back in time to 1920s Paris - a Parisian era he most closely identifies with. Here he meets Adriana (Marion Cotillard,) who prefers 19th Century Paris - along the way he also meets every famous writer, artist and filmmaker who happened to be around at the time, gaining insight into love and life. Expect the usual Woody neurosis, except this time with beautiful Paris filling up the screen at regular intervals. Really captures Paris wonderfully well.

8/10
This one surprised me. On paper it didn't seem like the kind of movie I'd get into but it ended up charming me. Kind of like Paris did to Gil. It didn't hurt that he was such a likable character. A great example of what an ideal audience surrogate should be.





Day of Wrath, 1943

Absalon (Thorkild Roose) is one of a panel of religious elders in a 16th century Norwegian village. When an elderly woman in the village named Herlofs Marte (Anna Svierkier) is accused of witchcraft, Absalon's much younger wife Anne (Lisbeth Movin) temporarily gives the woman shelter. As Herlofs Marta is tortured and draws closer to her execution, she begs Absalon to spare her life, as he spared the life of Anne's mother years before. Things get complicated as Anne begins to fall in love with Absalon's son, Martin (Preben Lerdorff Rye).

As much a horror film as it is a drama, this film takes an unflinching look at the cruel mechanisms of power in a community or society, as well as the hypocrisy of those who are given the power to speak with the authority of God.

One of the most shocking aspects of the film is the portrayal of the torture that Herlofs Marte endures as part of the religious "investigation." It basically involves dislocating her shoulders with a winch until she begs them to stop, giving a confession that is unconvincing and still laced with sincere denials. The real horror is that the men intend to execute her no matter what. There is no such thing as proving her innocence. They claim to want her soul to be pure, but in the end, they still intend a gruesome, cruel death for her.

Layered underneath the horror of the witch hunt is the story that is revealed about the history of Anne and Absalon's marriage. In bits and pieces we learn just how yucky the whole scenario is. Absalon is a good 45 years older than Anne, and as characters repeatedly say, he married her when she was a child. He spared the life of Anne's mother just so that he could marry her. When Anne asks him if he ever wondered if she loved him or wanted to be married, he bluntly and unapologetically answers that he never wondered or cared how she felt about the whole thing. Anne's attraction to Martin--the great sin---makes a ton of sense. He is actually her age (and the actors playing Anne and Martin were actually born the same year), and able to offer her physical comfort.

Something that I am still mulling over is the implication in the film that Anne may actually be a witch or have powers. We get a few hints through the film that witchcraft may actually be real---further than just the power of suggestion--and to me that does undercut part of the film's message a bit. I really liked a sequence later in the film where Anne interprets a supposedly tragic event as maybe being an act of God. Her conversation partner is slightly horrified, but I think that it really enforces the idea that God's intentions are so often just the reading of each human being and what they want to believe is true.

The stark black and white look of the film--only accentuated by the black and white clothing worn by the main characters--is both gorgeous and foreboding. There is great use of shadow, especially as certain characters will have darkness fall across them when asking or answering certain questions.

A really powerful, intense film.




Think you used enough dynamite there, Butch?


The Dawn Patrol (1938)
Directed by Edmund Goulding

"You know what this place is? It's a slaughterhouse, and I'm the butcher!" - Major Brand

Terrific casting brings Errol Flynn, Basil Rathbone and David Niven together in this First World War aviation drama. Tightly centred around the lives and operations of a frontline Royal Flying Corps fighter unit in 1915, consistently portraying the war as relentless and destructive.

Squadron Commander Major Brand (Rathbone) is at the end of his tether with the endless cycle of planning missions and sending out pilots, who have neither the experience nor the machinery to adequately fight and survive in their encounters - his pleas to headquarters continually falling on deaf ears. Aside from a couple of old hands in Captain Courtney (Flynn) and Lieutenant Scott (Niven), all he can do is wait nervously in his office, until the returning sound of the engines tells him how many have failed to return. Then the replacements arrive and the cycle continues.

The regular pilots, unburdened with the responsibility of command, are able to escape during their moments when off duty in celebrations of drink-filled merriment, gallantly toasting "the next man who dies". Then in an ironic twist of fate, following an attack on an enemy airfield against orders, Major Brand is promoted for the action and can finally be free of his own private hell. Courtney is unexpectedly placed in command and must learn to adapt, testing himself and friendships along the way. Many clichés are naturally presented throughout with only slight direct historical accuracy, but it's the fine acting and experience of the overall themes that give this movie its greatest appeal. The flying, combat and ground handling scenes all convey a reasonably authentic depiction of the subject, and in the end the film's message is crystal clear. The seriousness is always balanced by an endearing humour and I don't think I've ever seen a movie involving heavier drinking.

This film is a remake of the same title from 1930, and uses some of the earlier footage during many of the flying scenes. Despite this, it rarely looks out of place and in fact the film has a distinct look about it which gives the impression of being much older. The best of the WW1 aviation genre for me and a treat to have these three great stars.

9/10
Saw this a couple of years ago and fully agree. I was very impressed by the battle sequences and the three leading men were ideal casting for their roles. It definitely gave Flynn a little more dramatic gristle than he was normally given in his various swashbuckling roles.
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Guy who likes movies
Just finished watching the movie Death Rink on Amazon Prime. It's a "horror" movie about a killer targeting people who work at a roller rink. It was pretty bad. It took way too long to get to the action and the kill scenes were laughably bad. Literally. I actually laughed out loud at them. Performances were not very good and the dialogue was weak. The scariest thing about it is how bad it is.
is my rating.



26th Hall of Fame

Not Quite Hollywood (2008) -


My issue with some documentaries about movies is that they generally state info I already know about and am not interested in being reminded of, but fortunately, this documentary remained interesting by mentioning a ton of films I hadn't seen or heard of. Australia is a huge blindspot for me for cinema. I've seen a few classics (Mad Max, Walkabout, Wake in Fright) and a couple obscure films here and there, but there's also a bunch of films I haven't gotten around to yet.

This documentary is divided up into three parts (mostly) which explore three different types of genre films: sexploitation, horror, and action. Since I'm not an avid watcher of sexploitation films, most of the films listed in the first third didn't interest me that much, but I did enjoy listening to the commentary for those films, whether that may be the summaries the interviewees (directors, screenwriters, critics, etc.) gave on the various films or the insight from the actors and actresses who starred in those films. Outside of maybe a couple films, I'm probably not going to prioritize any of the movies mentioned in that segment, but the quality of the interviews made the first third a blast to watch.

The middle segment on horror films was easily my favorite part of the documentary. As an avid horror fan, most of the films listed in that segment interested me quite a lot in one way or another. Also, Tarantino's narration was definitely the main highlight of this section. Regardless of whether you can stand Tarantino or not, there's no denying that he loves cinema a whole lot and you could definitely get a sense of his profound interest in the genre during this third. Though I've only seen and heard of a couple horror films mentioned in the segment, I plan to watch them all eventually.

The final third on action films is probably the most interesting part of the documentary. Throughout this segment, we see many insane stunts (car crashes, people riding motorcycles off cliffs, etc.) and, while those stunts are impressive, they didn't always work out as planned. We learn that a few stunt actors involved in those stunts were either hospitalized or killed when those stunts backfired and this raises questions on whether Australia was going too far to create those movies. As a result, this segment becomes a cautionary tale that explores the darker side to the Australian New Wave.

Whether you're a fan of Australian film or not, Not Quite Hollywood proves to be an engaging, well-researched, and thought provoking breakdown of the country's output of film. Out of all the Australian movies mentioned in the documentary, I've seen Wake in Fright, Razorback, Howling III, Mad Max, and Rogue (Walkabout, which I mentioned at the start of this review, wasn't mentioned in the documentary). Wake in Fright and Mad Max are my favorites of this bunch, followed by Rogue.





After several attempts I was determined to finish this movie. Made it to the end, but my chief reaction was boredom. Leo very good, as per usual.
Ditto, this film bored the ar$e out of me. Only forced myself to finish it at the time as it was through Lovefilm.



Fantasy Island (2020)

7/10
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Day of Wrath, 1943

Absalon (Thorkild Roose) is one of a panel of religious elders in a 16th century Norwegian village. When an elderly woman in the village named Herlofs Marte (Anna Svierkier) is accused of witchcraft, Absalon's much younger wife Anne (Lisbeth Movin) temporarily gives the woman shelter. As Herlofs Marta is tortured and draws closer to her execution, she begs Absalon to spare her life, as he spared the life of Anne's mother years before. Things get complicated as Anne begins to fall in love with Absalon's son, Martin (Preben Lerdorff Rye).

As much a horror film as it is a drama, this film takes an unflinching look at the cruel mechanisms of power in a community or society, as well as the hypocrisy of those who are given the power to speak with the authority of God.

One of the most shocking aspects of the film is the portrayal of the torture that Herlofs Marte endures as part of the religious "investigation." It basically involves dislocating her shoulders with a winch until she begs them to stop, giving a confession that is unconvincing and still laced with sincere denials. The real horror is that the men intend to execute her no matter what. There is no such thing as proving her innocence. They claim to want her soul to be pure, but in the end, they still intend a gruesome, cruel death for her.

Layered underneath the horror of the witch hunt is the story that is revealed about the history of Anne and Absalon's marriage. In bits and pieces we learn just how yucky the whole scenario is. Absalon is a good 45 years older than Anne, and as characters repeatedly say, he married her when she was a child. He spared the life of Anne's mother just so that he could marry her. When Anne asks him if he ever wondered if she loved him or wanted to be married, he bluntly and unapologetically answers that he never wondered or cared how she felt about the whole thing. Anne's attraction to Martin--the great sin---makes a ton of sense. He is actually her age (and the actors playing Anne and Martin were actually born the same year), and able to offer her physical comfort.

Something that I am still mulling over is the implication in the film that Anne may actually be a witch or have powers. We get a few hints through the film that witchcraft may actually be real---further than just the power of suggestion--and to me that does undercut part of the film's message a bit. I really liked a sequence later in the film where Anne interprets a supposedly tragic event as maybe being an act of God. Her conversation partner is slightly horrified, but I think that it really enforces the idea that God's intentions are so often just the reading of each human being and what they want to believe is true.

The stark black and white look of the film--only accentuated by the black and white clothing worn by the main characters--is both gorgeous and foreboding. There is great use of shadow, especially as certain characters will have darkness fall across them when asking or answering certain questions.

A really powerful, intense film.

Probably the last really great movie I watched. Loved it.



Ditto, this film bored the ar$e out of me. Only forced myself to finish it at the time as it was through Lovefilm.
Eh, that's too much negativity piling about Inception in here right now; I think I'll counter it by re-posting my old review of it:



Your mind is the scene of the crime.

WARNING: spoilers below
About every decade or so, it seems like a new Sci-Fi/Action-er comes out and completely captures the imaginations of both the critics and the general public alike; in the mid-80's, The Terminator shocked audiences everywhere with its dark, nightmarish visions of a post-apocalyptic future, and at the end of 90's, The Matrix amped up the genre with a blend of unbelievable cyber-punk action and basic (but still intriguing) philosophical musings. And so, in keeping with this tradition, we saw the release of Christopher Nolan's Inception upon the world at the turn of the previous decade, a sleek, thrilling puzzle box of a film, one that expertly utilizes visceral action to get audiences to more easily swallow its mind-bending Sci-Fi concepts, creating a great example of the disappointingly rare breed of original modern summer blockbusters (in more ways than one), and a fairly iconic entry in modern popular cinema to boot.

It tells the story of Cobb, an expert thief who specializes in corporate espionage, albeit, an extremely unusual form of it; you see, instead of stealing business strategies or product prototypes from rival corporations, he instead specializes in breaking into people's minds, utilizing his crack team of "extractors" to craft and ridiculously elaborate dreamworlds in order to decieve their targets, and abduct the innermost secrets from their very subconscious. But, when Cobb is hired not to steal an idea, but to plant one instead, inside the well-defended subconsciousness of a corporate heir in a seemingly impossible task known as "inception", he must assemble an elite team of mindthieves to create the ultimate dreamworld, an impossibly convoluted, labyrinthian realm of dreams within dreams within dreams, with an equally complex scheme to go along with it, all while the traumatic memory of his wife continues to haunt him, threatening to ruin the entire plan, and make him become lost for forever in an endless mental abyss, one where reality and fantasy cease to be seperate.

Explaining the story any further than that would surely spoil it (at least, more so than I usually care to in my reviews), and more importantly, would be very, very hard to do, not only because of the extensive number of moving parts in the movie's plot, but also just because of the endless rules that govern the film's various dreamscapes, which become ever more complicated as they're unwrapped bit by bit, with new wrinkles being added on top of old, and the multiple layers and threads of the dream converge in spectacular fashion. To be perfectly honest, it's fairly confusing at times, especially when Nolan unnecessarily rushes through explaining certain important details, but despite that, I still understood enough of the basic gist of what was happening to keep those momentary bits of confusion from ruining the film. And besides that, it's still fascinating material on the whole, as Nolan created a lovingly detailed, fully fleshed-out cinematic concept here, having a lot of fun with experimenting and playing around with the possibilities of the various guidelines he created for the dreamworld, which makes for some surreal imagery that's rather striking in its sheer impossiblity (the ways the various dream levels interact with each other makes for a particularly tour-de-force fight sequence in a hallway), and you can easily see every moment of the 8 years of painstaking development he put into the central idea.

And, despite other flaws such as the occasionally overlong fight scenes against the disposable mental "projections" of the film's main target, or occasionally turning its characters into robotic, emotionless exposition machines, Inception still excels by making us to care about the people within it, and getting us to be as lost within the dreamworlds, and just as unable to tell fantasy from reality as they are (which isn't entirely unexpected, seeing as over half the film takes place within one dream or another). During its most memorable moments, there's a raw, sincere undercurrent of emotion flowing through the film, as we witness the most secret, innermost pains and regrets of not just Cobb, but the other characters within it as well, and when they recieve their ultimate moments of emotional catharis or acceptance onscreen, we in the audience feel it just as much as they do.

Of course, most of the events that happen in Inception don't actually, er... really happen, at least not for real, but that's part of the point; often, our perceptions of reality matters just as much as reality itself, sometimes even more so, and it doesn't matter if something is "real" in the film or not if it feels real. Of course, you can say that about any movie out there that's not a documentary, but Inception really makes a point of exploring that point at length, creating a relatively original popcorn flick, not just in the sense that it isn't based on any existing property, or that it contains a fairly novel core concept, but also in the way that isn't afraid to challenge your basic perceptions of what reality really is, and make you think while you're being entertained. So, when it comes to Inception, just forget what you think is real, and get ready to go deeper into one of the best blockbusters of the 2010's.

Favorite Moment:



Final Score: 8.5



Summer school (1987) 7.5/10




Fair use, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=18470590

Tora! Tora! Tora! (1970)

Wow. This was kind of great. A painful reminder of how wrong-headed historical war films are these days. Films like Pearl Harbor and Midway (2019). This puts more emphasis on diplomatic channels and chains of command - but when war erupts it's more spectacular because we're not getting computer graphics shoved up our posteriors. Instead, there are carefully worked out shots that give us a human view of what's going on. I haven't delved into this far enough to know how historically accurate it is, but it's well balanced, with American and Japanese sections directed by their own countries. Putting this on was a nice surprise.

8/10


By Illustrator unknown. "Copyright 1954 – Columbia Pictures Corp.". - Scan via Heritage Auctions. Cropped from the original image., Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/inde...curid=85717194

On the Waterfront - (1954)

This is all about Marlon Brando's performance - without it you'd have a much more average film about underhanded power struggles and mob control of a waterfront work district. Everyone is afraid to stand up, for they get singled out and either killed or lose their job. It takes a young woman (Edie - played by Eva Marie Saint) and Priest Barry (Karl Malden) to convince ex-boxer Terry (played by Brando) to stand up for justice. His guilt over helping murder Edie's brother plays a pretty big role too. That speech in the cab, where Terry laments what could have been to a brother who betrayed him is a classic, and I found myself trying it out loud and became convinced that I could have been a contender.

9/10


By Designed by Macario Gómez Quibus. "Copyright 1959 – United Artists Corp.". - Scan via LiveAbout. Cropped from original image., Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/inde...curid=85794299

Some Like it Hot - (1959)

And now for my dirty dirty secret. This is my second time around with this film, and I just don't get why it has the revered place it does in the pantheon of all films. It's a fine comedy - but I just don't love it with all my heart. I like it. It's okay. I just don't see it as brilliant. I just can't find it within myself to get into Marilyn Monroe comedies... I wish she'd played more serious parts.

7/10
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Some Like it Hot - (1959)

And now for my dirty dirty secret. This is my second time around with this film, and I just don't get why it has the revered place it does in the pantheon of all films.
Don't worry, I'm with you on this. It's depends on your POV whether that's a good thing or not. Not sure what I'd rate it, but without that last line, it'd be at least half a mark less.




Songs From The Second Floor (2000, Roy Andersson)

At first you might think this film is just nonsensical, with too much quirkiness for quirkiness' sake but, as you get settled into its rhythm and visual style, it starts to make more and more sense. Andersson's cinematic parable catches a glimpse of society on the brink of a collective mental malaise and disintegration, with scenes of near zombie-like half-insane people conversing against the backdrop of bleak urban landscapes. But it approaches it with a cold restraint and a dry, darkly comedic squint, rather than going into an all-out depressing or shocking assault on the senses. The immaculately composed long takes (all static, with not a close-up shot in sight) are used to great effect by Andersson in conveying the sense of stasis and mental decline that permeates this world. A uniquely bizarre, nihilistic but oddly hilarious look at the fundamental problems of human existence and civilization.





Soldier, 1998

Set in the future, a group of soldiers are raised from babies to be the ultimate obedient killing machines. Todd (Kurt Russell) is the best of the best of these soldiers, but when a military leader (Jason Isaacs) introduces a new generation of super-soldiers, Todd finds himself discarded like trash on a random planet. Taken in by a band of outcasts and cared for by a couple, Mace and Sandra (Sean Pertwee and Connie Nielsen), Todd must figure out his place.

Listen, we've all seen this story a million times. A robotic, emotionless killer/soldier must learn to *tilts head to the side* . . . love?

It's all incredibly by the numbers. Todd silently takes in the affection between MAce and Sandra, and their child. He feels stirrings as he watches Sandra (in unsubtle close-ups) hang washing on a line. Gears turn in his head as locals give him a scarf as a thank you present. He gets triggered into PTSD as the locals yell and whirl at a dance. When the time comes, he shows off his strength and skills to a mixture of fear and awe.

But, I don't know, this film has a lot of people I'm happy to watch. Russell does a good job in the lead role, which doesn't ask a whole lot from him, but his chemistry with Pertwee, Nielsen, and Taylor Thorne (who plays the young child) is solid. Isaacs is suitably smarmy as the leader of the new soldiers.

What is kind of a let down is the action sequence in the final act, as the new soldiers come to kill the villagers. The action is just kind of a mess, and I had a bit of trouble fallowing what was happening. It was just a garble of darkly lit explosions and leaping bodies.

Very passable action elevated by a good cast. If I needed to put something on in the background while I vacuumed or something I could see rewatching this.






Interesting, but I think I was expecting too much out of it.
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Rocco and His Brothers, 1960

Under the watchful eye of their mother, Rosario (Katina Paxinou), the five Perondi brothers adapt to their new life in the city, having relocated from a more rural town after the death of their father. The main conflict of the film centers on Simone (Renato Salvatori) and Rocco (Alain Delon), who both fall in love with Nadia (Annie Giradot) to disastrous results.

For me, this film was a fascinating study in humanity, and specifically masculinity, with Rocco and Simone functioning as two extremes on the spectrum and Nadia serving as the vehicle for the expression of their personalities. Both brothers exist at a point approaching morbidity, and in their own way they do damage to those around them, especially Nadia.

Simone, with his brazen "lad" personality (he steals, and then tries to charm his way out of it), is probably what most people think of when they think of a destructive masculine character. Simone has the opportunity to pursue a boxing career, but he soon neglects his training, opting instead for smoking, drinking, and chasing Nadia. When things don't go right for Simone, his instinct is to blame and lash out at others. He takes no shame in bullying and dominating others, even if he has to take the cowardly approach of getting a gang of men to give him a total advantage. Simone, especially in the second half of the film, stalks through the scenes like a dangerous beast. It's his unpredictability that makes him so horrible, and the worse things get the more desperate he becomes.

But this film isn't just about an angry, bullying drunk who abuses others. It's also about Rocco, who in his own way does just as much damage. On the surface, Rocco is the "nice one". Ever self-sacrificing, Rocco is kind and has a gentleness that is very much at odds with Simone. Rocco constantly covers for his brother. He takes a job as a boxer, despite not even liking the sport all that much, because it helps to provide for the family. Two years after Simone and Nadia break up, he begins a relationship with her, and she understandably falls in love with him. With Delon's almost impossible good looks, Rocco, who one character calls "a saint", seems like the perfect man.

And yet.

There is a dark side to Rocco's "saintliness", a point where it trips over into something dark. In the beginning, Rocco's way of helping his brother already has unfortunate signs of enabling. Rather than help Simone, Rocco's interventions only allow his brother to continue his actions and become even bolder. There are two harrowing sequences in the film that involve Nadia. In one of those sequences, Simone gathers a group of men from his boxing circle and
WARNING: spoilers below
while his friends restrain Rocco, Simone pulls down a screaming Nadia and rapes her. While this is horrible and upsetting, the real kick in the gut comes later, when Rocco's take on the whole thing is that Nadia should go back to Simone, because his RAPE OF NADIA clearly shows that his feelings are really hurt and he must really love her. It's the soft-spoken language of empathy hiding a sentiment that is truly hideous.
Rocco's reaction to a sequence that happens later in the film is similarly horrific, tucked behind the appearance of loyalty and understanding.

A trap that the film capably avoids is turning Nadia into a mere prize to be fought over by the brothers. Giradot's performance is incredibly emotional and shrewd. At times, Nadia makes decisions that on the face of it seem counter-intuitive. After Simone's attack on her and Rocco, Nadia goes back to Simone, but the contempt (for him and a bit for herself) bubbles and roils underneath the surface. She drinks to much, numbing herself to the way it has all gone wrong. In many moments, Nadia articulates the twisted and unhealthy relationship between the brothers. She is both witness and victim to their sick dynamic, and as other characters disparage her for being a prostitute, or blame her for "cursing" Simone, she can only laugh bitterly. She knows that there will be no justice for her, and so she must settle for taking a front-row seat to Simone's self-destruction.

The dark horse of the film, in terms of the drama, is the younger brother, Ciro (Max Cartier). Ciro watches the behavior of both of his brothers and realize that he must carve a different path for himself. Ciro is not willing to engage in the brutish behavior that defines Simone's actions, but nor is he willing to turn his back on brutal, cruel behavior in the name of sibling loyalty as Rocco does. Ironically, despite both Rocco and Simone professing love for Nadia, it is Ciro alone who in any way does what is right by her. Ciro's innocent, loving relationship with his fiance stands in stark contrast to the way that Nadia is treated by both Rocco and Simone. There is an older brother, Vincenzo (Spyros Fokas) of whom we see very little, but his stable life with his wife and child also stands in contrast to the actions of the middle brothers. With the family's father dead and gone, there is a vacuum for paternal authority. It is Vincenzo and Ciro who most embody any kind of benevolent authority.

Powerful stuff, with really beautiful black and white photography.




TRIANGLE
(2009, Smith)



"I'm sorry I'm acting weird. It's just I'm having deja vu every time I turn a corner."

Triangle follows Jess (Melissa George), a single mother that goes on a boat trip with a group of friends. When an unexpected storm capsizes their boat, they find an apparently derelict cruise ship only to find out that someone on board might be stalking them and killing them.

This is a film that was recommended by a couple of people, and what a nice surprise it was. Without trying to give too much away, Smith starts from an inventive script and uses deft direction to weave this story in a way that consistently makes you go "huh? what?" while also making you go "yeah, it figures!"

Grade:



Full review on my Movie Loot
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TRIANGLE
(2009, Smith)





Triangle follows Jess (Melissa George), a single mother that goes on a boat trip with a group of friends. When an unexpected storm capsizes their boat, they find an apparently derelict cruise ship only to find out that someone on board might be stalking them and killing them.

This is a film that was recommended by a couple of people, and what a nice surprise it was. Without trying to give too much away, Smith starts from an inventive script and uses deft direction to weave this story in a way that consistently makes you go "huh? what?" while also making you go "yeah, it figures!"

Grade:



Full review on my Movie Loot
Triangle is SO GOOD! A great October film, and it's really rewarding on a rewatch.