Favorite Director and Why?

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Not sure if anyone has done this before.
My favorite director is George A Romero because he has not only revolutionized the zombie genre but also made great films on a low budget, he is my biggest influence and I wish that he had a proper final film.
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Martin Scorsese. He's the perfect balance of artistry and entertainment, is formidable in virtually any genre and he's remained a formative and important figure in my understanding of cinema at virtually any age.



I have several actually ..

Ridley Scott - I have seen a lot of his films and I consider them all very good to great.
Anders Thomas Jensen - love his films and his use of Mads in them.
Jean Cocteau - love his direction of movement in his films and La Belle et La Bete is my favorite fairytale.



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Guy who likes movies
Mine is Alfred Hitchcock. He directed several of my favourite films that I consider masterpieces. His films were consistently entertaining, with good to great performances and well crafted.



Martin Scorsese. He's the perfect balance of artistry and entertainment, is formidable in virtually any genre and he's remained a formative and important figure in my understanding of cinema at virtually any age.
This 100% for me too.



A system of cells interlinked
There is another Favorite Director Thread, but it doesn't have the "and why" addition, so we will keep them separate for now.

I can't choose just one favorite director. Here are a few that top the list of favorites for me:

David Fincher - Lately, this is my go-to director for re-watches. I have also gobbled up a bunch of mini-documentary style videos on Youtube that analyze his work. Fincher aka The Technician is right near the top for me currently.

Martin Scorsese - I was much more into Marty's stuff say, 10-15 years ago, but I still consider him to be a favorite. His track record is impeccable, and while I understand his style is off-putting to some, I adore it.

Stanley Kubrick - A true master and auteur. When watching a Kubrick film, it is always apparent I am watching a titanic intellect and artistic talent. I have a feeling I only comprehend about 40% of what the guy was trying to get across.

Honorable Mention: David Lynch - I used to be a huge Lynch guy, but have kind of gotten away from him as of late. Still amazing, but I am less into his stuff these days.
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My favorite director is the director whose work I'm currently into...and that's because I see something in their style and subject matter choices that suits me. Currently I'm intrigued by the filmography of John Sturges. I just watched a film of his last night, Backlash (1956) and was duly impressed. I've seen enough of his films to sense his directorial style...So I'm interested in seeing more of his work. Hopefully that answers the OP's question.



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Overall I'd have to say Stan Brakhage just for the massive filmography of only bangers. I'd need to see more of Obayashi's work and I know he's done a lot of director-for-hire type work but his last 3 films are all-time greats and the most I've ever "felt" cinema. Would also throw Harmony Korine up there as well as he's the guy I'm the most excited to see a new film from.


edit: should also mention the obvious in Fellini and Godard I suppose.



Dennis Villeneuve
I find his movies immersive. The pacing is perfect for me (I know it can be slow for others).


Vikramaditya Motwane

Man knows his craft really well. His attention to detail is amazing, which shows on the screen. I like how he has not stuck to a single genre.



My favorite director is the director whose work I'm currently into...and that's because I see something in their style and subject matter choices that suits me. Currently I'm intrigued by the filmography of John Sturges. I just watched a film of his last night, Backlash (1956) and was duly impressed. I've seen enough of his films to sense his directorial style...So I'm interested in seeing more of his work. Hopefully that answers the OP's question.
Sturges sure had an eclectic range in movies. Two of my favorites are Bad Day at Black Rock (1955) and The Old Man and the Sea (1958). I'm not sure if I've seen any of his 1940s pictures. Any recommendations?



Sturges sure had an eclectic range in movies. Two of my favorites are Bad Day at Black Rock (1955) and The Old Man and the Sea (1958). I'm not sure if I've seen any of his 1940s pictures. Any recommendations?
I've not seen any of Sturges' 1940s films either, but he sure made a lot of fun-adventure type films. Mystery Street (1950) is an unusual police forensic investigation noir, with Ricardo Montalban....my review



I've not seen any of Sturges' 1940s films either, but he sure made a lot of fun-adventure type films. Mystery Street (1950) is an unusual police forensic investigation noir, with Ricardo Montalban....my review
Nice review. It was an unusual film for its day, as you say. I've always been a big Elsa Lanchester fan. I think she lit up any film she was in-- so many memorable performances. She and Laughton must have been a formidable pair in real life..



My favorite is Stanley Kubrick. Not only does he obviously had the technical skills, but he knew how to master pretty much every genre releasing iconic films in pretty much every one, with not a single bad film under his belt.
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Stanley Kubrick because how can it not be Stanley Kubrick.



Movies are the only artform I have a definitive answer for this. Even if a couple of other directors (Fassbinder and Cassavetes) have an emotional core I might respond stronger to at times. And Altman's endless career of impassioned folly fills me with admiration. For a moment I can pretend it's someone else.



But not really. It's Kubrick and it's no contest.