MoFo Health Thread

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my health fluctuates between very healthy and totally horrible trash-can body. I need to get better at music or else im gonna be stuck like this forever.



I quit smoking in '03 after a 40+ year habit. In my view, the hardest thing for most people about quitting is THINKING about quitting. The actual stopping is not that traumatic.

I used to come up with every rationale in the book about why it was okay for me to smoke. And I used to break out into a cold sweat when imagining quitting. But I was surprised that after a few days, a week, I really didn't miss them. And it was such a pleasure not being looked upon as some kind of a pariah: wondering where I could smoke, where I couldn't, and resenting places I couldn't smoke.

It also helps to have some type of physical symptoms: throat pain, hoarseness, COPD, etc. Then one can be scared into stopping. I had throat pains which persisted for 3 months after quitting. I finally went to the ENT doc, who examined me and said that my throat looked fine. As I walked out of his office relieved, I thought, "Well, hey, maybe I could start smoking again."



I quit smoking in '03 after a 40+ year habit. In my view, the hardest thing for most people about quitting is THINKING about quitting. The actual stopping is not that traumatic.

I used to come up with every rationale in the book about why it was okay for me to smoke. And I used to break out into a cold sweat when imagining quitting. But I was surprised that after a few days, a week, I really didn't miss them. And it was such a pleasure not being looked upon as some kind of a pariah: wondering where I could smoke, where I couldn't, and resenting places I couldn't smoke.

It also helps to have some type of physical symptoms: throat pain, hoarseness, COPD, etc. Then one can be scared into stopping. I had throat pains which persisted for 3 months after quitting. I finally went to the ENT doc, who examined me and said that my throat looked fine. As I walked out of his office relieved, I thought, "Well, hey, maybe I could start smoking again."
Robert Downey, Jr. (of all people) said what I consider to be the best statement: ďThe easy part is quitting smoking. The hard part is not starting again.Ē This resonated with me so much. Itís exciting to stop smoking. People are cheering for you & you feel mighty proud. Then, two weeks later youíre forgotten & alone in your apartment. Why not have a quick ciggie?

So right about physical symptoms. My husband spent an unhappy weekend with a very severe sore throat. He could barely swallow. (In the days before Urgent Care walk-ins.) When he got some meds on Monday & felt better, he stopped smoking & never smoked again. After God knows how many decades of smoking he didnít miss it at all. I was so envious that he could quit so easily. But the sore throat had scared him so much.
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Iím here only on Mondays, Wednesdays & Fridays. Thatís why Iím here now.



The trick is not minding
Friday night, my mother had a stroke. Saturday, it was discovered she had a blood clot in her brain. She remains in the hospital in ICU, where my brother and I have been denied entrance due to COVID restrictions, and only my sister has been allowed in.

Last night we got the news, and as I feared, she is paralyzed along her left side.



I quit smoking in '03 after a 40+ year habit. In my view, the hardest thing for most people about quitting is THINKING about quitting. The actual stopping is not that traumatic.

I used to come up with every rationale in the book about why it was okay for me to smoke. And I used to break out into a cold sweat when imagining quitting. But I was surprised that after a few days, a week, I really didn't miss them. And it was such a pleasure not being looked upon as some kind of a pariah: wondering where I could smoke, where I couldn't, and resenting places I couldn't smoke.

It also helps to have some type of physical symptoms: throat pain, hoarseness, COPD, etc. Then one can be scared into stopping. I had throat pains which persisted for 3 months after quitting. I finally went to the ENT doc, who examined me and said that my throat looked fine. As I walked out of his office relieved, I thought, "Well, hey, maybe I could start smoking again."

and the heightened stigma ushers in another false excuse if you let it get to you...



Friday night, my mother had a stroke. Saturday, it was discovered she had a blood clot in her brain. She remains in the hospital in ICU, where my brother and I have been denied entrance due to COVID restrictions, and only my sister has been allowed in.

Last night we got the news, and as I feared, she is paralyzed along her left side.
Will say a prayer for your mother. Awful news. 🙏