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Where the Lilies Bloom - This is a little known (or simply overlooked) 1974 gem based on the award winning YA novel by Bill and Vera Cleaver with a screenplay by Earl Hamner Jr (creator of The Waltons).

The Luther family live a hardscrabble life in the Great Smoky Mountains of North Carolina. Patriarch Roy Luther (Rance Howard) has been in bad health since the death of his wife. His oldest daughter Devola (Jan Smithers) has taken on the domestic responsibilities of her mother. Fourteen year old Mary Call (Julie Gholson) is the level headed one and looks after 10 year old Romey (Matthew Buril) and four year old Ima Dean (Helen Harmon). Knowing that his days are numbered Roy Luther takes Mary Call aside and tells her that, because of Devola's head in the clouds nature, she is to be responsible for keeping the family together after he passes. He also makes her promise not to call in a doctor or an undertaker but his most important request is that under no circumstances is she to let Devola marry well to do farmer Kiser Pease (Harry Dean Stanton). Roy Luther blames Kiser for settling an outstanding tax debt which resulted in the family losing their land and being forced to sharecrop.

When Roy Luther succumbs to his illness the family bands together to keep outsiders from finding out. They know this would lead to the authorities splitting them up with the children going into foster care. The children learn from local store owner Mr. Connell that pharmacists in the larger cities will pay money for homeopathic plants and roots. Since their late mother was the leading local expert in "wildcrafting" and left them a homemade journal the kids are able to scrape by while also making sure to show up at school every day. But the responsibilities are a huge weight to Mary Call and despite the back breaking, round the clock work the family continues to walk the razors edge between survival and complete collapse. It's a short film which still manages to tell an affective and endearing tale.

90/100




By May be found at the following website: http://www.banksyfilm.com/, Fair use, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=27515445

Exit Through the Gift Shop - (2010)

Thierry Guetta is a somewhat obsessive fellow who followed street artists around filming what they did for a long time - and eventually tried his hand at it, lamely copying what they were doing but making a fortune. This documentary follows his path. After Searching for Sugarman I'm wary of being totally fooled by documentaries that bend the truth. Guetta (otherwise known as Mr. Brainwash) may simply be a construct of the artist known as 'Banksy' - but overall this doc shows us that people can be so easily fooled by crap and knock-offs that any artistic appraisal you give to anything should come with questions - always questions. I was on Guetta's side all the way until he decided to mindlessly copy other artists and sell his works for ridiculously large sums of money. When that happened my mind went "ugh".

8/10


By Sony Pictures Releasing - http://www.impawards.com/2019/beauti...ghborhood.html, Fair use, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=61900962

A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood - (2019)

I got two conflicting things out of this film. The first is that Tom Hanks has crossed over into territory where he has the screen presence of a behemoth, and can take real-life characters like Chesley 'Sully' Sullenberger or Fred Rogers, inhabit them, then magnify them so they transform ordinary films into noteworthy ones. The other thing is that without Hanks this would be a tired film, relying on well-worn clichés - though I did enjoy the sparkle the Wes Anderson-like toy cities gave it. Is everyone else meant to pale into insignificance next to Hanks as Rogers? Perhaps a little. There could have been something great here, but in the end it was an average film about healing old wounds in a family.

6/10


By May be found at the following website: IMP Awards, Fair use, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=37693847

Only God Forgives - (2013)

I'm going out on a pretty thin limb here, because this film is rated very poorly by many, but I love Only God Forgives. My reasons for doing so are very spoilerish...

WARNING: spoilers below
It doesn't try to redeem the irredeemable - something I see in most violent gangster films I watch. It teases that it's going to. It makes a point of this. From the moment Ryan Gosling's Julian refuses to shoot his brother's killer on moral grounds to the moment he shoots one of his own co-assassins to save a small girl, it's telling us that what always happens is about to happen. Turn this ugly human being into some kind of "hero" for doing what he's meant to be doing all along. Then it doesn't. Julian is never redeemed. He's a gangster - and ineffectual to boot. The cop who brings him down isn't a hero either - the film explicitly tells us that there are no 'good guys' in this filthy den of drug dealing and prostitution. There are points you go to where redemption shouldn't be the name of the game - because it's no longer possible. Just because you refuse to do the next awful mission does not make you an angel - you have to own what you've done in life.


It's a visually splendid film as well. Merciless. Fearless in travelling in a direction that would obviously upset a certain percentage of an audience right off the bat. I enjoy it's subversions, and enjoy watching Vithaya Pansringarm's inscrutable 'Terminator' Chang - the most unusual arbiter of justice I've seen in a film for a long time. In most other films he'd be the villain - a bad cop for a Mel Gibson or Brad Pitt to take down. In this cesspool he's the hero.

Yeah, I know I'm the only person who likes Only God Forgives.

9/10
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My movie ratings often go up or down a point or two after more reflection, research and rewatches.

Latest Review : Apocalypse Now (1979)



I absolutely love Only God Forgives, as well as the vast majority of Refn's output.



Vithaya Pansringarm is also in Ninja: Shadow of a Tear, one of the better DTV action flicks around.




By May be found at the following website: IMP Awards, Fair use, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=37693847

Only God Forgives - (2013)

I'm going out on a pretty thin limb here, because this film is rated very poorly by many, but I love Only God Forgives. My reasons for doing so are very spoilerish...

WARNING: spoilers below
It doesn't try to redeem the irredeemable - something I see in most violent gangster films I watch. It teases that it's going to. It makes a point of this. From the moment Ryan Gosling's Julian refuses to shoot his brother's killer on moral grounds to the moment he shoots one of his own co-assassins to save a small girl, it's telling us that what always happens is about to happen. Turn this ugly human being into some kind of "hero" for doing what he's meant to be doing all along. Then it doesn't. Julian is never redeemed. He's a gangster - and ineffectual to boot. The cop who brings him down isn't a hero either - the film explicitly tells us that there are no 'good guys' in this filthy den of drug dealing and prostitution. There are points you go to where redemption shouldn't be the name of the game - because it's no longer possible. Just because you refuse to do the next awful mission does not make you an angel - you have to own what you've done in life.


It's a visually splendid film as well. Merciless. Fearless in travelling in a direction that would obviously upset a certain percentage of an audience right off the bat. I enjoy it's subversions, and enjoy watching Vithaya Pansringarm's inscrutable 'Terminator' Chang - the most unusual arbiter of justice I've seen in a film for a long time. In most other films he'd be the villain - a bad cop for a Mel Gibson or Brad Pitt to take down. In this cesspool he's the hero.

Yeah, I know I'm the only person who likes Only God Forgives.

9/10
No. No you're not. I'm also a big fan of Refn's work. You should check out Too Old to Die Young. It's a 10 episode miniseries on Amazon Prime.



Registered User
The Voyeurs (2021)




Could this poster be any more on the nose? Look, here are the voyeurs... ...they're lookin' in 'yer window, watchin' 'ya copulate!



Why is it that voyeur movies are almost always about people having sex? It's either that or someone is getting killed. Or it's both, as in Body Double where the voyeur tunes in for porn with a telescope and gets snuff instead.



Where are the "slice of life" voyeur films that just show us people learning about other people's lives by peeking in? Surely, there is another way to motivate a "peekaboo premise" than to show us the beast with two backs?



Why is it that voyeur movies are almost always about people having sex?
Maybe because it's the (most) common interpretation of the word? Someone who gets their kicks from watching others have sex. I know it has other meanings too, but I'm pretty sure that's the first thing that comes to mind for the majority of people.
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Registered User
Maybe because it's the (most) common interpretation of the word? Someone who gets their kicks from watching others have sex. I know it has other meanings too, but I'm pretty sure that's the first thing that comes to mind for the majority of people.

That's a fair cop.



Zodiac (2007)--enjoyable procedural with some gorgeous film of San Francisco. It really is beautifully filmed.
I give it 4/5 popcorn boxes and a handful of milk duds.



Professional horse shoe straightener
'Funeral Parade of Roses' 1969


Close to a masterpiece. Chunks of French new wave. Chunks of Czech New wave. It's a dark, beautiful and graphic foray into the transvestite community in the underbelly of Tokyo's swinging sixties. Some wild editing and photography too.

9.2/10

........................................................................
'Certified Copy' 2010


Very intriguing Kiarostami film. Like a Kieslowski melded with Linklaters before/after trilogy.

7.8/10



Bright light. Bright light. Uh oh.
I applaud your tenacity I found it too boring to finish.
The ending's the whole point for the movie. I gave it the same rating. 5.5/10
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The Abominable Dr. Phibes - This 1971 camp horror classic stars Vincent Price and is directed by Robert Fuest. He not only got his start on the seminal British spy series The Avengers but also directed another of my favorite macabre horror flicks The Devil's Rain. That one however was said to have essentially ended his career. That's how bad that supposedly was.

But this one is a decapitated horse of a different color. Price plays Dr. Anton Phibes, a once renowned concert organist. It's set in the 1920's so I suppose organists were the rock stars of their day. The film also makes full use of the period with beautiful art deco sets and designs. Phibes is believed to have died in a car accident while rushing home after hearing of the death of his beloved wife Victoria during a surgical procedure. But he didn't die. He was instead horrifically disfigured and is now busily at work avenging his wife by methodically killing off the team of surgeons and nurses whom he blames for her death. He's set in motion an elaborate plot based on the The Ten Plagues of Egypt where each victim will die in numerical order. Helping him in his quest for vengeance is his beautiful and mute assistant Vulnavia (Virginia North). Joseph Cotten costars as the head of the surgical team and Phibes' final target Dr. Vesalius. Terry-Thomas also appears as smut aficionado Dr. Longstreet.

This has a lurid sort of pulpy vibe that is different than anything that preceded it. Phibes clockwork orchestra, his (and other) vintage vehicles and the wardrobe choices are all part of an elaborate and elegant production design. There's also a 1972 followup titled Dr. Phibes Rises Again and even though it's worth watching it doesn't hit the heights this one does.

85/100




By May be found at the following website: http://www.banksyfilm.com/, Fair use, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=27515445

Exit Through the Gift Shop - (2010)

Thierry Guetta is a somewhat obsessive fellow who followed street artists around filming what they did for a long time - and eventually tried his hand at it, lamely copying what they were doing but making a fortune. This documentary follows his path. After Searching for Sugarman I'm wary of being totally fooled by documentaries that bend the truth. Guetta (otherwise known as Mr. Brainwash) may simply be a construct of the artist known as 'Banksy' - but overall this doc shows us that people can be so easily fooled by crap and knock-offs that any artistic appraisal you give to anything should come with questions - always questions. I was on Guetta's side all the way until he decided to mindlessly copy other artists and sell his works for ridiculously large sums of money. When that happened my mind went "ugh".

8/10
I saw this a couple of months ago and really dug it. It really puts your head in a spin as far as what people call art.
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By May be found at the following website: IMP Awards, Fair use, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=37693847

Only God Forgives - (2013)

I'm going out on a pretty thin limb here, because this film is rated very poorly by many, but I love Only God Forgives. My reasons for doing so are very spoilerish...

WARNING: spoilers below
It doesn't try to redeem the irredeemable - something I see in most violent gangster films I watch. It teases that it's going to. It makes a point of this. From the moment Ryan Gosling's Julian refuses to shoot his brother's killer on moral grounds to the moment he shoots one of his own co-assassins to save a small girl, it's telling us that what always happens is about to happen. Turn this ugly human being into some kind of "hero" for doing what he's meant to be doing all along. Then it doesn't. Julian is never redeemed. He's a gangster - and ineffectual to boot. The cop who brings him down isn't a hero either - the film explicitly tells us that there are no 'good guys' in this filthy den of drug dealing and prostitution. There are points you go to where redemption shouldn't be the name of the game - because it's no longer possible. Just because you refuse to do the next awful mission does not make you an angel - you have to own what you've done in life.


It's a visually splendid film as well. Merciless. Fearless in travelling in a direction that would obviously upset a certain percentage of an audience right off the bat. I enjoy it's subversions, and enjoy watching Vithaya Pansringarm's inscrutable 'Terminator' Chang - the most unusual arbiter of justice I've seen in a film for a long time. In most other films he'd be the villain - a bad cop for a Mel Gibson or Brad Pitt to take down. In this cesspool he's the hero.

Yeah, I know I'm the only person who likes Only God Forgives.

9/10
You are not alone, mon frere, I too love OGF and, honestly, I just can never understand the arguments against it. To me, it is clearly great at being exactly what it is and wants to be, while being something I really like. It's like they made this movie for me. And made it well. And now I know they also made it for you. So, cheers.







The Abominable Dr. Phibes - This 1971 camp horror classic stars Vincent Price and is directed by Robert Fuest. He not only got his start on the seminal British spy series The Avengers but also directed another of my favorite macabre horror flicks The Devil's Rain. That one however was said to have essentially ended his career. That's how bad that supposedly was.

But this one is a decapitated horse of a different color. Price plays Dr. Anton Phibes, a once renowned concert organist. It's set in the 1920's so I suppose organists were the rock stars of their day. The film also makes full use of the period with beautiful art deco sets and designs. Phibes is believed to have died in a car accident while rushing home after hearing of the death of his beloved wife Victoria during a surgical procedure. But he didn't die. He was instead horrifically disfigured and is now busily at work avenging his wife by methodically killing off the team of surgeons and nurses whom he blames for her death. He's set in motion an elaborate plot based on the The Ten Plagues of Egypt where each victim will die in numerical order. Helping him in his quest for vengeance is his beautiful and mute assistant Vulnavia (Virginia North). Joseph Cotten costars as the head of the surgical team and Phibes' final target Dr. Vesalius. Terry-Thomas also appears as smut aficionado Dr. Longstreet.

This has a lurid sort of pulpy vibe that is different than anything that preceded it. Phibes clockwork orchestra, his (and other) vintage vehicles and the wardrobe choices are all part of an elaborate and elegant production design. There's also a 1972 followup titled Dr. Phibes Rises Again and even though it's worth watching it doesn't hit the heights this one does.

85/100
This really has become one of my favorites. And Vulnavia has become one of my favorite Horror Henchpersons, if not my No.1.