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One of my favorite movies. Period. It completely knocked me out when I saw it in 1962, and it contributed not only to changing my own burgeoning philosophy, but to a whole generation's.

It's pretty tame today in comparison to most of the excesses in modern films, but it had an enormous impact when it came out. It was in the first wave of the Italian invasion that was to loosen up people's morals. The young generation was in the process of changing from Playboy and Cal Tjader "cool", to Hippie, and this film was a palpable catalyst.

I enjoyed your review. Don't know why I never reviewed the film, but I'll get around to it one day..
I saw it about 4-5 days ago, and I can already tell you it's a film that will grow in appreciation with me, probably as all that symbolism sinks in.
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Fun, gory, never takes itself too seriously and not too long either. Great entertainment
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There has been an awekening.... have you felt it?





Re-watch for the millionth time. So freakin good.
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Re-watch for the millionth time. So freakin good.
It's a great film fur sure. Have you seen Repulsion and The Tenant, btw? If so, what did you think of them? I think The Tenant is my favorite of the trilogy, though I need to rewatch Rosemary's Baby soon.



It's a great film fur sure. Have you seen Repulsion and The Tenant, btw? If so, what did you think of them? I think The Tenant is my favorite of the trilogy, though I need to rewatch Rosemary's Baby soon.
The Tenant is my favourite too, but were a minority.



Whenever I think about Repulsion,
WARNING: spoilers below
I think about when Carol rips that poor old woman's cuticle and how painful that would be. I've seen so many movies featuring painful ways to get injured or die, but that injury affects me the most. As a result, I try to not even think about the movie, much less rate or discuss it. Is that weird?
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Last Great Movie Seen
Dune (Villeneuve, 2021)



Whenever I think about Repulsion,
WARNING: spoilers below
I think about when Carol rips that poor old woman's cuticle and how painful that would be. I've seen so many movies featuring painful ways to get injured or die, but that injury affects me the most. As a result, I try to not even think about the movie, much less rate or discuss it. Is that weird?
That's valid.



Blow Out (1981) - 6/10 - in my opinion, I know better movies of Brian de Palma




It's a great film fur sure. Have you seen Repulsion and The Tenant, btw? If so, what did you think of them? I think The Tenant is my favorite of the trilogy, though I need to rewatch Rosemary's Baby soon.
Yes, seen both. Love Repulsion because of Deneuve, but RB is my fave. Best thing Farrow ever did IMO.



Whenever I think about Repulsion,
WARNING: spoilers below
I think about when Carol rips that poor old woman's cuticle and how painful that would be. I've seen so many movies featuring painful ways to get injured or die, but that injury affects me the most. As a result, I try to not even think about the movie, much less rate or discuss it. Is that weird?
We saw it in the theater in '65. Really shook me up. Afterwards it took me 3-4 beers to calm down. Was half way reluctant to watch any Deneuve film for awhile after. You can see why I'm not a horror fan..

I recall that scene where she opens her bedroom mirrored cupboard door. As it slowly swings open it suddenly reflects a threatening looking man in the room. Shocked the tweet outta me. That type of scene has been used hundreds of times since, but I think that may have been the first.



Bright light. Bright light. Uh oh.

Hollow Point (Daniel Zirilli, 2019)
- 5/10
The Marksman (Robert Lorenz, 2021)
5.5/10
Behind the Mask (John Francis Dillon, 1932)
5/10
Kiss Me Kate (George Sidney, 1953)
7/10

"From This Moment On", the best dance number in this Cole Porter musical of The Taming of the Shrew, with Ann Miller, Bob Fosse, Carol Haney, Bobby Van, Tommy Rail and Jeanne Coyne shaking a leg.
Age of Indiscretion (Edward Ludwig, 1935)
6/10
The Penthouse (Massimiliano Cerchi, 2021)
5/10
Service De Luxe (Rowland V. Lee, 1938)
5.5/10
Nobody (Ilya Naishuller, 2021)
6.5/10

Seemingly milquetoast Bob Odenkirk reveals new sides to his personality after a home invasion.
The Ballad of Billy McCrae AKA Red Mist (Chris Crow, 2021)
5/10
Trick or Treat (Charles Martin Smith, 1986)
5.5/10
Sunset Murder Case (Louis J. Gasnier, 1938)
5/10
West Michigan (Riley Warmoth, 2021)
6/10

Teenager Chloe Ray Warmoth learns some things about herself on a road trip with her brother (Riley Warmoth) to get to see their grandfather before he dies.
Assault on VA-33 (Christopher Douglas-Olen Ray, 2021)
+ 5/10
Natural Disasters AKA All About Sex (Dakota Gorman, 2020)
6/10
Rhythm in the Clouds (John H. Auer, 1937)
5/10
The Courier (Dominic Cooke, 2020)
6/10

Oleg Penkovsky (Merab Ninidze) and Greville Wynne (Benedict Cumberbatch) engage in spy activity during the Cuban Missile Crisis.
12 Days (Raymond Depardon, 2017)
6/10
Stolen Paradise (Louis J. Gasnier, 1940)
5/10
Be Good or Be Gone (Cathal Nally, 2020)
5.5/10
Nebraska (Alexander Payne, 2013)
7/10

Gorgeous film where Will Forte takes his underachieving dad (Bruce Dern) from Billings, Montana to Lincoln, Nebraska to prove he didn't win a million dollar sweepstakes.
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The Whisperers (1967) -


Though this film was hard to watch, I appreciated a lot about it. Most notably, Edith Evans' spectacular performance. As others have noted, she effectively captures the solitude and isolation of someone who's lived in isolation throughout so much of her life to the point she has imaginary conversations in her apartment. Overall, her work in this film is pretty incredible. I normally don't pay attention to acting when I watch films, but her performance here would definitely make a short list of my favorite acting performances.

While there's a focus on her current mental state, we mainly see instances of other people mistreating her. Well, a lot of them, actually. She's mistreated when she goes to church, she's mistreated by her son, she's betrayed by a friend, she's insulted by a neighbor when she voices her concern for her safety, she's mistreated by her husband, etc. While this isn't all that happens to her in the film (the hospital sequence is one of the only instances that anyone shows genuine care for her), a lot of this film consists of her being mistreated, verbally abused, and neglected by those around her. Due to this, I imagine a lot of people will be depressed by this film.

WARNING: spoilers below
While Mrs. Ross's arc could be simplified to her being mistreated over and over again, I think a lot more is going on. Finding the money her son left acted as her opportunity to find solace from her current state of isolation and discomfort. It's implied that, before the events of the film, Mrs. Ross didn't have many social communications, nor did she talk to many people. She mainly spent her life living in isolation from the outside world. The heart of the film can be found in Mrs. Ross's desire to break free from her current mental state and her continued attempts to pursue this goal, even as they keep falling flat. Yes, none of her efforts work out, and yes, she ultimately goes back to her life of solitude. Looking back, however, the film ultimately didn't leave me depressed when it ended. I think the ending is more hopeful and layered than it seems on the surface. This is because her apartment has now become a place of comfort for her instead of a torturous environment. I got the sense from the ending that she's more comfortable with her life of isolation than she was in the beginning, reacting to the leaky faucet in her apartment with a smile and a content "Are you there?" rather than the nervous "I know you're there! You leave me alone!" she exclaimed at the start of the film. The Whisperers is about Mrs. Ross attempting to break free from her current unhealthy living condition, being unable to accomplish this task, but obtaining a new fondness for and a sense of comfort with her apartment in the process. While it was a bumpy road, she became better off in the end.



We saw it in the theater in '65. Really shook me up. Afterwards it took me 3-4 beers to calm down. Was half way reluctant to watch any Deneuve film for awhile after. You can see why I'm not a horror fan..

I recall that scene where she opens her bedroom mirrored cupboard door. As it slowly swings open it suddenly reflects a threatening looking man in the room. Shocked the tweet outta me. That type of scene has been used hundreds of times since, but I think that may have been the first.
I can see why that movie would make you swear off horror. I'm a horror fan anyway, but I've found that the scariest movies and the ones that have stayed with me the longest are ones like Repulsion that feature the kind of people you meet in real life and places you go to almost every day (and are thus often labeled thrillers) instead of monsters and haunted mansions.