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Eh, I see no reason to think that @Takoma11 wouldn't love it the same as anyone else. I know she was hesitant to start it because of the vocal (but very small) minority of Skyler-manhaters out there, when those guys completely missed the point of the show anyway (that Walter is the real bad guy in the end); it's like not wanting to check out Taxi Driver despite all the praise for that movie just because a few people somehow manage to idolize Travis. It's like, did you guys watch the same movie that I did?
Hmm, my communications skills this week have already proven... limited, and were less than 24 hours in?.. Basically, I’d beg to differ, but this probably isn’t the place or time. I’m no incel Walter White fan, but god, I hated Skyler. I would more or less agree that she works as a character to propel the plot - and everything in that show is meticulously done - but I really truly disliked every bit of her, and I dare you to tell me how on Earth that means I missed ‘the point of the show’. It’s a personal experience of the character, in the end.

As for @Takoma11, I was joking - of course Takoma probably appreciates more things than I do. If something is brilliant, I doubt that disagreeing with it ideologically can really ruin the enjoyment. (Takoma, do show your face when you feel like it, as I feel a bit awkward talking about you in third person.)

P.S. Far more importantly, ‘You’ is no ‘Breaking Bad’. My original post was about the potential impact of ‘You’ on Takoma, which I couldn’t possibly compare on the impact ‘Breaking Bad’ had on me.

ADMIN EDIT: continued in the Breaking Bad thread, here: https://www.movieforums.com/communit...53#post2149053



On Dangerous Ground - 1951 Nicolas Ray noir starring Robert Ryan as Detective Jim Wilson, an embittered and callous NYC cop. He's had so many brutality complaints that his supervisor (Ed Begley) sends him out of town to help out with an investigation. A young girl has been murdered and when he arrives at the small and snowy mountain town he finds most of the men beating the brush for the suspect. This include the girl's enraged father (Ward Bond) who vows to kill the man when he finds him. He and Wilson pair up and soon enough are on the suspect's trail which leads them to the home of Mary Malden. She's played by Ida Lupino (or Ida Lupini as Fred Sanford used to call her on Sanford & Son) and turns out to be blind and alone. She eventually admits however to living with her brother Danny. The denouement unfolds as expected but with added gravitas provided by the heartfelt script and Ryan, Lupino and Bond.

This is a surprisingly overlooked film but also singular in that it starts out as a hard boiled noir but morphs into an emotionally resonant treatise on loneliness, hope and repentance. Lupino allegedly directed part of this when Ray fell ill during production. 90/100



As for @Takoma11, I was joking - of course Takoma probably appreciates more things than I do. If something is brilliant, I doubt that disagreeing with it ideologically can really ruin the enjoyment. (Takoma, do show your face when you feel like it, as I feel a bit awkward talking about you in third person.)
Stu is referring to my very negative reaction to the harassment that Anna Gunn received because of playing the character. When I build negative associations with art, for whatever reason, it looms really large in my vision. My family are all pretty big fans of Breaking Bad, including my sister who has really similar taste. I'm sure I'll get around to it in ten years or so.

Also, it's not yet a film I watched, because I'm in the middle of it, but I'm very intrigued by The Ninth Configuration. I can't quite get a grasp on how I feel about it. I'l be interested to hear other thoughts when I'm done.



Stu is referring to my very negative reaction to the harassment that Anna Gunn received because of playing the character. When I build negative associations with art, for whatever reason, it looms really large in my vision. My family are all pretty big fans of Breaking Bad, including my sister who has really similar taste. I'm sure I'll get around to it in ten years or so.

Also, it's not yet a film I watched, because I'm in the middle of it, but I'm very intrigued by The Ninth Configuration. I can't quite get a grasp on how I feel about it. I'l be interested to hear other thoughts when I'm done.
I've watched Ninth Configuration a few times and I still don't know how I feel about it



Stu is referring to my very negative reaction to the harassment that Anna Gunn received because of playing the character. When I build negative associations with art, for whatever reason, it looms really large in my vision. My family are all pretty big fans of Breaking Bad, including my sister who has really similar taste. I'm sure I'll get around to it in ten years or so.

Also, it's not yet a film I watched, because I'm in the middle of it, but I'm very intrigued by The Ninth Configuration. I can't quite get a grasp on how I feel about it. I'l be interested to hear other thoughts when I'm done.
Sorry, I get it now - I hadn’t realised you haven’t actually watched it. I totally get that - as I mentioned, I avoided watching it for years for my own reasons. No one could persuade me otherwise. The harassment was awful, of course. But I guess the character always grows on the performer, unfortunately, especially when it lasts this long.

I think I’ve seen The Ninth Configuration, but it must have been some time ago, as I remember very little. How are you finding it? Are you at least interested?



Also, it's not yet a film I watched, because I'm in the middle of it, but I'm very intrigued by The Ninth Configuration. I can't quite get a grasp on how I feel about it. I'l be interested to hear other thoughts when I'm done.
The Ninth Configuration didn't do a whole lot for me. Here's what I wrote on it last year or so:

The elements for a great film are certainly here, but while it had a handful of standout moments and a promising setup, I can't say I liked it and it ultimately failed to connect with me by the time it was over. For instance, it definitely took its sweet time to get going as most of the buildup detailed the various shenanigans of the patients who acted under Kane's treatment. While this buildup wasn't necessarily bad or anything (a few scenes of the patients interacting with the staff members and the people outside the asylum brimmed with a delightful sense of awkwardness), there were many moments where it seemed to be restating this premise without expanding much upon it, causing it to grow somewhat thin at times. Also, the fact that the plot twist was predictable given how each flashback only served to make it more and more obvious didn't help with my appreciation of this section. Once the film got to the twist, it certainly got a lot more interesting with the highlight being the uncomfortably tense bar fight. Overall though, I was ultimately left indifferent to how this was handled since it seemed to jumped right into the final act after the big reveal, sacrificing a lot of time which could've been used to flesh out Kane and his newly discovered mental state in the process, and how the payoff to the film was telegraphed far ahead of time in a rather awkward way. In short, the film suffered quite heavily from a ton of bloat.



I've watched Ninth Configuration a few times and I still don't know how I feel about it
Ha! I was going to finish it tonight, but I went to the gym for the first time in 10 months and the vibe in my house right now is very much




Sorry, I get it now - I hadn’t realised you haven’t actually watched it. I totally get that - as I mentioned, I avoided watching it for years for my own reasons. No one could persuade me otherwise. The harassment was awful, of course. But I guess the character always grows on the performer, unfortunately, especially when it lasts this long.
I'm also, if I'm honest, not overly interested in it.

I think I’ve seen The Ninth Configuration, but it must have been some time ago, as I remember very little. How are you finding it? Are you at least interested?
I'm certainly interested by it. More a question of whether it's going anywhere and whether (if it is a case of style over substance) the weirdness will be enough to carry it.

Stu: I'll come back and read your thoughts when I've finished it.



You’re the disease, and I’m the cure.
Animal House(1978):
One of the funniest films of all time, a collaboration between Harold Ramis and John Hughes, it shows the start of a great comedian with a promising career ahead (John Belushi, R.I.P). Holds up quite well and has a simple premise.
9/10
Weird Science(1985):
John Hughes best teen comedy. Had a huge crush on Kelly LeBrock (still do). Wish Anthony Michael Hall had more of a career then he did. Also has a really good soundtrack though short, still has a huge impact on the film.
9.5/10
__________________
“I really have to feel that I could make a difference in the movie, or I shouldn't be doing it.“
Joe Dante



I'm also, if I'm honest, not overly interested in it.
Just because of the Skyler-haters? Don't let them ruin a great show for you, now!



Just because of the Skyler-haters? Don't let them ruin a great show for you, now!
Nah. Even pre-fanbros it wasn't a story that appealed to me. Drama TV is maybe my least favorite genre. It tends to lack the element of escapism and/or comfort that I look for in my TV viewing. Also, meth had a pretty horrible impact on several of my students and their families, and I'd just be on edge watching a show with that in the center.

Watched this semi-recently and I was pleasantly surprised by how fun it was.

I'm not Stu (provided you're referring to TNC), but thanks!
Oops! I'm really sorry.



Sullivan's Travels

*****/*****

A thoroughly charming and classic film about making movies that flirts with metafiction that dominates this style of film nowadays.



Sullivan's Travels

*****/*****

A thoroughly charming and classic film about making movies that flirts with metafiction that dominates this style of film nowadays.
Yep, great film and one of my favorite first time watches of this year.



Yep, great film and one of my favorite first time watches of this year.
Same. I've got Lady Eve ready for a Sturges follow up. Somehow, the only film of his I've seen previously was The Beautiful Blonde from Bashful Bend, which while a perfectly fine and charming film in its own right, seems to be along his lesser works.