A scary thing happened on the way to the Movie Forums - Horrorcrammers

Tools    





the Friday the 13th reboot
Underrated movie!!!

I get what youíre saying but I canít quite share the feeling. While I can certainly be harder on films that waste talent and resources on a lower product, I also know how difficult it is to do any of this so when I can sense that a director is trying in any regard, even if itís merely aesthetic, I canít place it in a ďhate itĒ category.

I reserve that for lazy and cynical incompetence with resources (Netflixís Red Notice) comes to mind or films that feel like they can replace talent/effort/purpose with hollow provocation (Uwe Boll).

If someone manages to pull off an actual style, I almost certainly at least find it mediocre when I step away from any hyperbolic disappointment I feel at the moment. Except the Predator. But I canít tell if thatís a brilliant self sabotage or the worst movie ever made by talented people. Maybe both.



Jim Carey's Grinch
Anything post Chasing Amy by Kevin Smith


Those are qualifiers for being worse too.
Smith is a good example of someone that didnít feel properly rewarded for his effort with Red State (hey, we can keep it horror themed too), which remains something of an anomaly and high water mark for him as a director and craftsman, so he decided to stop trying at all.

Yoga Hosers might be one of the most miserable experiences Iíve had watching a comedy that wasnít made by Friedberg and Seltzer.



Synchronic -


From DeLoreans to hot tubs, movies have given us many clever means of time travel. Instead, what if time travel was something you ingested? The title of this pretty good sci-fi horror is a drug that does just that, and it's keeping New Orleans EMTs Steve (Mackie) and Dennis (Dornan) busy. Despite getting to work together, the pals aren't having the best time (no pun intended) of it, with Dennis contending with a new addition and his directionless teenage daughter, Brianna (Ioannides), and Steve coping with an unfortunate diagnosis. To make matters worse, Brianna has just disappeared.

The movie's time travel concept, which could be inspired by McConnaughey's "time is a flat circle" monologue in True Detective - a character even uses a record to describe it - is as clever as its presentation, especially when the past appears in the room like a construction accident occurred. That writer Benson did his research in his depictions of New Orleans' past is a bonus, a highlight being when Steve runs afoul of a Spanish explorer in a swamp. Also, in addition to how the EMTs are still reckoning with a certain unfortunate event in their city's history, the movie makes a convincing argument that may ruffle a few nostalgia lovers' feathers: the past sucks. What prevents this from being a great movie instead of just a pretty good one, though, is that as unique and thought-provoking as its take on time travel may be, the missing person quest that it tells with it is not. I'm still glad I watched it, especially since I've been wanting to get into Benson and Moorhead's work for a long time and I'm eager to see more. Oh, and if you've only seen New Orleans native Anthony Mackie in his Falcon armor, it's as good a place as any to see him in a role without it.



Underrated movie!!!
errrrrrrr

I get what youíre saying but I canít quite share the feeling
You don't have to. I'm not interested in changing anyones mind to not like something they do like. Only to clarify the little niche area of movie appreciation I live in. To draw attention to films that do the kind of things I like in hopes of deepening the apprecation of those kinds of things when someone else comes across them.


While I can certainly be harder on films that waste talent and resources on a lower product, I also know how difficult it is to do any of this so when I can sense that a director is trying in any regard
I know what you're saying, and I think for years I felt similarly, until I started realizing I could appreciate the effort or difficulty in one column, and in another I could zone in on what I actually think is important in art. What makes certain films stand out and mean more, and fixate exclusively on this when it comes to what my preferred aesthetics are. So in these kind of discussions I'm particularly vicious towards what doesn't measure up as a way of making the distinction clear regarding the ethereal, x-factor elements I'm always hoping to find in any piece of art. And I find its hard to explain what this is without having something to starkly contrast it against. And a movie like Babydriver or Saw, even if they do some elements technically well, are perfect specimens to hold up and say 'no thank you' to.

The reality is that while difficulty and learning is impressive on its own, I don't really know what it has to do with art. Time and time again it is proven to me that simplicity is often better, and artists with no learning at all aren't kept from finding equally or more interesting avenues of expression.

I feel appreciating on this level (particularly if it is all we can find of worth in a film) turns art into a feat of strength. I think of watching an Olympic level shotputter. I can see what he's good at. There's lots of proof of his immense strength and dedication to his training as he hurls that heavy ball a considerable distance but.....at the end of the day what did I learn about anything watching him outside of the fact that he's strong and clearly practiced throwing that pointlessly heavy thing a bunch?


even if itís merely aesthetic, I canít place it in a ďhate itĒ category.
I don't actually hate any movie either (except for those which I consider as nothing but product). I'm only profoundly disappointed in them.


I reserve that for lazy and cynical incompetence with resources (Netflixís Red Notice) comes to mind or films that feel like they can replace talent/effort/purpose with hollow provocation (Uwe Boll).
I've only seen one Boll and he would absolutely be on the hate pile just from that singular experience. He deserves to be considered as the worst director of all time. Literally. I don't need to see anymore.


If someone manages to pull off an actual style, I almost certainly at least find it mediocre when I step away from any hyperbolic disappointment I feel at the moment. Except the Predator. But I canít tell if thatís a brilliant self sabotage or the worst movie ever made by talented people. Maybe both.
Babydriver has style, style put to much better use in virtually all of Wright's other films.


So does Wan, but I just think it's a boring and tacky and insecure style. Even with all the money he's made from his films, I still feel embarrassed for him whenever I watch him movies.



Them having style is what put them in my crosshairs. I only shoot big game.



I've been wanting to get into Benson and Moorhead's work for a long time and I'm eager to see more.
In my opinion, it is ESSENTIAL that you watch their films in release order (Synchronic hopefully being an exception--haven't seen it yet). You'll thank me later.



In my opinion, it is ESSENTIAL that you watch their films in release order (Synchronic hopefully being an exception--haven't seen it yet). You'll thank me later.
It's less essential to watch Synchronic in sequence but there are some nods to the previous films. I don't even know if I caught them on my own or if I had to read about them later. But yeah @Torgo, watch Resolution next, for sure.
__________________
Captain's Log
My Collection



I thought Synchronic was too videogame-y to be fully enjoyable. Something about movie plot devices having rules just doesn't do it for me. That I can remember, because it's been a minute. Definitely their worst in my opinion. I liked or loved everything else Benson and Moorhead have made.



Do you wanna party? Its party time!
Last horror flick I saw was Witchboard, which is goofy fun but not much else. The kills are good, at least.
__________________
Down The Rabbit Hole
Down A Dark Alley

Latest Movie Viewing: So I Married an Axe Murderer (1993)
Latest Album Listened To: Wolfgang Amadeus Phoenix, Phoenix (2009)
Latest TV Show Viewed: The Last Drive-In With Joe Bob Briggs S5



Last horror flick I saw was Witchboard, which is goofy fun but not much else. The kills are good, at least.
I liked it a lot more than I expected to. Though I feel like it somewhat lost it in the last 15 minutes or so.



In my opinion, it is ESSENTIAL that you watch their films in release order (Synchronic hopefully being an exception--haven't seen it yet). You'll thank me later.
It's less essential to watch Synchronic in sequence but there are some nods to the previous films. I don't even know if I caught them on my own or if I had to read about them later. But yeah @Torgo, watch Resolution next, for sure.
Oh no, I failed to follow your advice right off the bat!
I resolve to watch their first feature next.



Oh no, I failed to follow your advice right off the bat!
I resolve to watch their first feature next.
The good news is that Synchronic is my least favorite, so the best is yet to come. (In my opinion, of course)

@Takoma11, is Spring tied to the Resolution-verse? I can't remember now. I believe it was the first one I watched, so maybe I wouldn't have caught it at the time.



Oh no, I failed to follow your advice right off the bat!
I resolve to watch their first feature next.
I'm sorry it's . . . it's too late.

@Takoma11, is Spring tied to the Resolution-verse? I can't remember now. I believe it was the first one I watched, so maybe I wouldn't have caught it at the time.
Not sure. I think I watched Spring, then Resolution, then The Endless. I'd have to go back and rewatch Spring.



Smile, 2022, 2nd watch (B)

Loses a lot on a rewatch. I think the surprise of the hallucinations and the uncertainty of it was a big part, but without that feeling, the movie is not strong enough on its own.

Pulse, 2001, 2nd watch (A+)

About as close to perfect as one can get with a horror film. The atmosphere is just exquisite, and the lack of clear emphasis on everything gives it a dreamlike quality that really sucks you in. Every scene flows so well into each other.

Amer, 2009 2nd watch (A+)

I love this one a lot more the second time. At first, I thought it looked a bit too experimental, like it was almost a rehearsal for the style Cattet and Forzani would use in Strange Color, but that was completely wrong. This is a perfectly balanced study of three days in a woman's life. Disarmingly simple, but filled with so much texture and so many sounds to sink your attention into, if one is open to this kind of filmmaking. I'll be watching this one again multiple time for sure.

Mad God, 2021 (A-)

A stop motion body horror film about a man in a diving bell/ww1 gas warfare outfit descending in what is atmospherically Hell, but physically an incomprehensible series of biomechanical scenes with ant-like gnomes and giant humanoids, as well as smaller humanoids and lots of strange creatures doing strange things.

What keeps me from loving this more is that there is so much going on, and whatever meaning anything has is so opaque, that I can't make up my mind as to the meaning of it all, or indeed if there is one, or if this is simply meant to be a visual experience. Definitely worth seeing however.



Pulse, 2001, 2nd watch (A+)

About as close to perfect as one can get with a horror film. The atmosphere is just exquisite, and the lack of clear emphasis on everything gives it a dreamlike quality that really sucks you in. Every scene flows so well into each other.
Yeah, it's incredible.

Like, I get why The Ring got so much buzz, but Pulse is incredible and so moving.



Do you wanna party? Its party time!
I liked it a lot more than I expected to. Though I feel like it somewhat lost it in the last 15 minutes or so.
The ending is hilariously goofy, although having the hero's girlfriend go crazy with an axe is kinda inspired. That and um, well, how the main problem is resolved, ha ha!



Do you wanna party? Its party time!
Double bill of Fatal Games and Graduation Day. Games clearly was the lower budget of the two, and the killer uses a javelin for some odd reason. It's pacing is off, and half the movie feels like a sports flick, not a slasher movie. Lame.

Graduation Day is a solid Friday the 13th style rip off with some nicely done kills and a solid conclusion. I enjoyed that one, Troma was responsible so that explains why it's a fun goofy 80s slasher. Both viewed thanks to Tubi.



Do you wanna party? Its party time!
Also even though So I Married an Axe Murderer isn't a horror movie, parts of it sure felt as if it was one. Myers and Nancy Travis have good chemistry together, the ending is exciting and some of the jokes work pretty well. The cameos are rad, and the "Woman! Woooo man!" beat poem is still echoing in my brain. Myers has done better, regardless this is a nice movie, a good way to kill 90-100 minutes. Also seen thanks to Tubi, which is my favorite free app.



I just posted a review of the film The Long Walk, and I would give it a strong recommendation to this crowd. A really solid horror with a time travel element.