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Yeah, the number is incredible. And it's even more impressive when you realize he's seen a lot of movies multiple times. He's in the top 3 of the people I "know" that saw the most films. There's a guy from Los Angeles who's seen 40,000, too. I once thought he was Mark and even messaged Mark to ask but turns out they're separate people! Imagine that, two 40K-something film marathoners in the Los Angeles vicinity! There's also a guy from Norway who's seen more than 33,000 and is still going strong. The dude has a wife and a kid now but it doesn't seem to faze him! I'm pretty sure both of these people will end up beating Mark mathematically, but I don't think they rewatch films as often as Mark did.

I mean, it's just a number, but it's rather fun to see and realize how much is much when talking about Mark's film watching. We always knew he saw a lot of movies but only when put into an actual humongous number does it really ring out. A film legend, indeed.
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That's only the movies he rated on imbd though. There are definitely some he never got around to rating there, especially ones he hadn't watched again since he started putting his ratings there.

Yeah, the number is incredible. And it's even more impressive when you realize he's seen a lot of movies multiple times. He's in the top 3 of the people I "know" that saw the most films. There's a guy from Los Angeles who's seen 40,000, too. I once thought he was Mark and even messaged Mark to ask but turns out they're separate people! Imagine that, two 40K-something film marathoners in the Los Angeles vicinity! There's also a guy from Norway who's seen more than 33,000 and is still going strong. The dude has a wife and a kid now but it doesn't seem to faze him! I'm pretty sure both of these people will end up beating Mark mathematically, but I don't think they rewatch films as often as Mark did.

I mean, it's just a number, but it's rather fun to see and realize how much is much when talking about Mark's film watching. We always knew he saw a lot of movies but only when put into an actual humongous number does it really ring out. A film legend, indeed.
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I always wanted to be an f.



I told someone this in a private message the other day, but he used to keep ledgers where he would handwrite every movie he watched and its rating and the date, so there are books filled with that info if they're still around somewhere. I took a look last night too at a couple books he had of film ratings, one of which he worked on, and there were handwritten notes in those too of his own ratings or updated ratings over time. Believe it or not, back in the 80s he rated a lot of things even lower than he would now. There was a big shift at some point, if I'm remembering correctly, where he basically adjusted all his ratings up one.



I told someone this in a private message the other day, but he used to keep ledgers where he would handwrite every movie he watched and its rating and the date, so there are books filled with that info if they're still around somewhere. I took a look last night too at a couple books he had of film ratings, one of which he worked on, and there were handwritten notes in those too of his own ratings or updated ratings over time. Believe it or not, back in the 80s he rated a lot of things even lower than he would now. There was a big shift at some point, if I'm remembering correctly, where he basically adjusted all his ratings up one.
I'd love to see that typed up at some point.
Like on online diary of his work.

Mark's work with movies is legendary, Sarah.
Of course, it's all up to you guys on that, but speaking from personal experience knowing him and all.

Hope you guys are going ok considering what's happened. We're all still thinking of you and your family, no doubt about that.

Also, while you're online, I want to extend our group hand, and let you all know that we're all here for you guys, whenever and in whatever capacity you need us.



Always had time for a Dodgers game. My mom told me a story yesterday about how they had taken a vacation and were ending it going to a friend of hers wedding, but that the Dodgers were playing that day, so he watched that instead of going to the wedding and that game was when this happened.



Apparently he was very smug about his decision afterwards.

Frankly, I'm shocked to learn that he had time to watch baseball games.
That's time he could've spent watching movies!



Oh man. This actually feels kinda weird. Never had a fellow forumite die before.
I remember another member, Deadite, passed away a few years ago (I have posted here for 10 years, most frequently in 2012-2014): https://www.movieforums.com/communit...hlight=deadite
Both were very valuable members.



Man this made me tear up, my condolences @sarah f

Truly one of the best members this forum had. In my more active days he gave me so many great reccomednations. I wonder how many of my top 100 I watched because of him.

This is tough
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Yeah, there's no body mutilation in it



I remember another member, Deadite, passed away a few years ago (I have posted here for 10 years, most frequently in 2012-2014): https://www.movieforums.com/communit...hlight=deadite
Both were very valuable members.
Deadite, wherever you are, I can't help but believe you're better off and laughing at us.

R.I.P.



Always had time for a Dodgers game. My mom told me a story yesterday about how they had taken a vacation and were ending it going to a friend of hers wedding, but that the Dodgers were playing that day, so he watched that instead of going to the wedding and that game was when this happened.



Apparently he was very smug about his decision afterwards.
My entire extended family missed a now-legendary local sports moment because we were at a cousin's wedding. Also 1988, coincidentally. Your dad made the right decision. My cousin has never lived that down.



You mean me? Kei's cousin?
Rest in peace, Mark. You were a real pal.
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Look, Dr. Lesh, we don't care about the disturbances, the pounding and the flashing, the screaming, the music. We just want you to find our little girl.



Just going through the reviews section and getting some quotes...

I'd recommend going through his reviews.
They're short, sweet, and inciteful.

On Joe (1970)
Originally Posted by mark f
The film is, by turns, dated and prescient; racist and satirical; low-budget and high-inspiration; amateurish and well-made; shocking and thought-provoking; hokey and mind-blowing.



On Star Wars: A New Hope (1977)
Originally Posted by mark f
The Empire Strikes Back, my #80 film on this list, is a beautiful film and highly worthy of praise, but just like Godfather II, it needs some legs to stand on, and even then, it doesn't quite reach the heights of its predecessor.
No rating


On EXistenZ (1999)
Originally Posted by mark f
I could spend another page on the film's final 10 minutes, but in general, I believe the film is the film, just like the game is the game.



On Who Framed Roger Rabbit
Originally Posted by mark f
I love the fact that you can make a legit film noir and have the majority of the characters toons.


On Jaws (1975)
Originally Posted by mark f
From its opening scene, Jaws proves itself to be a film full of tension and unafraid to show you things which you've never seen before.
No rating

On Cloverfield (2008)
Originally Posted by mark f
Yes, it's better than most all the '50s and '60s films of a similar nature, but those were all low-budget, mostly-cornball, and knew it. I find this film better in most every way, but it still seems more like a gimmicky blueprint than a full-blooded sci-fi/horror/monster flick.


On Total Recall (1990)
Originally Posted by mark f
So let's recap for me: this is my fave Dick flick, my fave Verhoeven, fave Schwarzenegger, favorite Mars flick, fave Cox performance, vote for one of the fastest movies ever, a film which seems to be neverending in its visual wit, crypticness and general crowd-pleasing nature.


On The Exorcist (1973)
Originally Posted by mark f
The "crucifix" scene still ranks to me as one of the most shocking scenes ever depicted in film.
No rating

On Black Narcissus (1947)
Originally Posted by mark f
Now, trust me, I know this film is considered one of their best and I like it a lot, but when you're supposed to be feeling for all the characters, sometimes it just seems too pat and easy a setup.


On Sleepy Hollow (1999)
Originally Posted by mark f
In fact, Johnny Depp's Ichabod Crane now seems to be trying to solve a series of murders which somehow resemble those in the earlier Fincher film, but since this is Burton, it never quite reaches the darkness level of SE7EN.


On Avatar (2009)
Originally Posted by mark f
I could get into a couple of flicks which may have inspired the avatar set-up and scenes, but this film takes it so much further down the line that it's not really worth it.


On Casablanca (1942)
Originally Posted by mark f
Casablanca is many viewer's gateway into the films of Humphrey Bogart and classic films in general.


On Australia (2008)
Originally Posted by mark f
To tell you the truth, the film which Australia most reminds me of is Pearl Harbor, but I like that film more than most do, even if I've only watched it once.


On The Fly (1986)
Originally Posted by mark f
Somehow, the characters in this film, Seth (Jeff Goldblum) and Roni (Geena Davis), are so empathetic and wonderfully portrayed by the pair of actors that they turn the film into a pure tragedy, almost ranking with Brooksfilms' own The Elephant Man or The Hunchback of Notre Dame which this film occasionally resembles visually.


On American Werewolf In London (1981)
Originally Posted by mark f
One other thing I have to say about the film is that although the transformation scene is impressive and placed in the middle of the film, it's just another scene, and to me, it's no more "special" or better than the scenes with the balloons or in the subway or at the hospital with lovely nurse Alex (Jenny Agutter)


On Room At The Top (1959)
Originally Posted by mark f
This film, which is certainly one of the more powerful dramas, is crammed with witty, satiric dialogue which helps to build up the point that most everybody lets everybody know what they really think of each other.


On The Thing (1982)
Originally Posted by mark f
It's a lean, mean, fighting machine with almost nothing in the way of wasted scenes and a strong sense of its own capability of holding your interest while taking it's sweet time in building things up.


On Heaven Can Wait (1943)
Originally Posted by mark f
First off, it's Lubitsch's first color film and it's one of the most-immaculate color films of the 1940s.


On Blue Velvet (1986)
Originally Posted by mark f
Most critics disagree with me, and Woody Allen said that it was the best film of the year, but that was probably because he was dealing with his own guilt issues at the time.


On Inglourious Basterds
Originally Posted by mark f
I'd probably say that overall, I gave the film extra points for trying to act like Tarantino knew "anything" about German cinema at all while just faking it to try to make his film better and more "realistic".


ON Woman Of The Year (1942)
Originally Posted by mark f
The last time I tried to discuss this flick, I was double-teamed by Loner and Yoda who both seemed to imply that the film was sexist and that it was a fait accompli that America's second most-important woman (Kate Hepburn) would completely give up her much too complicated career to become Spencer Tracy's "slave" and housewife by cooking waffles and toast at the same time.


On Point Break (1991)
Originally Posted by mark f
I know people who think the entire flick is camp, and if that's the only way you can enjoy it, then I say that you should go for it and try to have a good time.


On Natural Born Killers (1994)
Originally Posted by mark f
OK, I'm not going to get too-seriously into the details of the plot because if any film didn't really care about its plot, it's this flick.


On Alice In Wonderland (1951)
Originally Posted by mark f
I don't really want to go into how fast-paced and insane this film is, but it's a non-stop assault on the pomposity of logic and staid Victorian England which is also still able to include digs at many modern foibles which humans have in our current day and age, among them being rude and in far too much of a hurry to even say good day.


On Forest Gump (1994)
Originally Posted by mark f
The point of Forrest Gump and what makes it an important stepping stone for many people who have no concept or desire to learn about the history of the United States during the last 50 years is that movies can actually teach them something about reality which is totally separate from vampire love, torture, wizards, werewolves, paranormal bull****e, bogus witches, etc. When I used to teach at my school, more teenagers probably learn about the concepts of the reality of rock and roll, civil rights, modern U.S. political assassinations, the Vietnam War, AIDs, etc., from Forrest Gump. However, the key is that it makes most of them want to learn the OTHER truth about all those subjects after watching it.


On A Clockwork Orange (1971)
Originally Posted by mark f
The music in A Clockwork Orange was really overpowering, perhaps even moreso than the potent imagery. It was really quite shocking to see it considering that Kubrick's last film was the G-rated 2001: A Space Odyssey.


On 12 Angry Men (1957)
Originally Posted by mark f
The real key to 12 Angry Men's success is Reginald Rose's tightly-wound script, which provides all the jurors [who seem to be heading, shall we say, due west] with flaws and personalities and then as it slowly reveals all of the people we've never seen in the film (those mentioned or testifying during the trial), the semblance of doubt begins to take root in more than just one juror's mind.


On Alien (1979)
Originally Posted by mark f
Alien is a classic and one of those films which should be seen on as large a screen as possible.


On 2001 A Space Odyssey (1968)
Originally Posted by mark f
I'm not sure what else to say. Kubrick was always a perfectionist and he certainly is here. I have watched the film dozens of times dating back to seeing it at the theatre in 1970. I'll admit to not "getting it" the first time when I was 14, but I knew I was watching something which was spectacular and unlike any thing I had ever seen, so it made watching it a compulsive experience.



I always got a kick out of it when mark would repost his Bringing Up Baby review:

Bringing Up Baby (Howard Hawks, 1938)


Classic screwball comedy doesn't get much screwier than this. Paleontologist David (Cary Grant) receives the intercostal clavicle of a brontosaurus which will complete his reconstruction of the fossil dinosaur for his museum and proceeds to the golf course to try to obtain a million dollars from the lawyer of a rich benefactor. He immediately becomes entangled with flighty Susan (Katharine Hepburn) who just happens to be the niece of the benefactor (May Robson). Susan is taking care of her brother's pet leopard Baby, and when David visits her home, Baby escapes and the family dog becomes interested in David's bone and proceeds to take and bury it somewhere. What started out as manic turns into insanity as a visiting big game hunter (Charlie Ruggles) tries to hunt the leopard, and another, wild leopard gets added into the mix. Grant is an expert farceur here and plays well against Hepburn's slightly-quieter, yet equally-outrageous manner. There is no doubt that there's sexual attraction between the two leads, at least as much as possible between scientific "Dr. Bone" who "just went gay all of a sudden" and a 12-year-old girl running around in a 30-year-old's body. (Trust me, that last line makes sense.) Screwball comedies are basically romantic comedies at heart, but they just try to disarm you with crazy laughter before you accept the fact that the couple is a match made in heaven... or at least in this case, movie heaven. Or in Miss Vicky's case, movie hell.

It made me laugh every time.



28 days...6 hours...42 minutes...12 seconds
Mark f was the best person on this site. Full stop.

The man always read my reviews, always gave me a rep, and wouldn't hesitate to talk to me about movies. He was my damn Vice President for crying out loud.

His love of Jaws was infectious. To the point that when he gushed about it I would find myself throwing it in my dvd player just to revisit it.

It blows my mind still to think that I started here before Mark did. He was such a presence here that it feels like he was here since the beginning. He had such a warm heart toward cinema and the people here that I am simply floored at this post. Sarah, my condolences to you and your family. May he continue to watch the movies he loves in a better place.

I hate that I've been MIA from this site this year, as I feel like I never had the chance to really talk to him lately. It almost felt like he LIVED on this site. This is a huge loss for this community.

I'm going to miss that guy, he was the genuine deal when it came to watching movies and being an all-around great guy. He was also so damn proud of you Sarah.
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"A laugh can be a very powerful thing. Why, sometimes in life, it's the only weapon we have."

Suspect's Reviews



I thought I remembered this fact correctly but had to dig to be sure. Mark came to MovieForums because I invited him. We were both members of a long-defunct other movie board. It was fairly active but nothing like MoFo. I thought he would be a good fit and as that board began to wither away I kept emploring him to check it out. He finally did and the rest is MoFo history...

Howd-a-lee Dood-a-lee, Mark!

Yes, Mark is an old compadre from another (now essentially defunct) movie-related board. He's good people, and he's probably seen at least as many movies as me, if not more...yet we also have very distinctive tastes, you'll find. Lots of overlap for the love on many classics, sure, but also some very sharp (and friendly) differences.

Glad to see you finally checked MoFo out, and maybe you'll hang around for a while? Hope you and the family are all doing well, and I'll be talking to you soon!


"Yeah, definitely, definitely good to see you. Uh-oh: of
course I'm not wearing underwear."
For all the similarity in taste and having messaged each other hundreds of times and done all of those MoFo podcasts together I never met Mr. French in person. By the time I got to Portland, OR and was making semi-regular trips down to La La Land I believe Mark's health was already at the point where he wasn't leaving the house much. Would have loved to catch a classic at The Cinerama Dome or someplace else with him.

I am very glad I introduced him to this community that he got to interact with so incessantly and so joyously for all of those years.

Enjoy your Big Sleep, you celluloid hero worshipper whose own love for cinema touched so many others.

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"Film is a disease. When it infects your bloodstream it takes over as the number one hormone. It bosses the enzymes, directs the pineal gland, plays Iago to your psyche. As with heroin, the antidote to Film is more Film." - Frank Capra



Just a quick throw down of Mark Fs Mofo 1950s list, the list that I had the pleasure of hosting:

Marks List
1. Alice in Wonderland (#27)
2. The Quiet Man (#51)
3. Paths of Glory (#8)
4. Room at the Top (#73)
5. Rear Window (#2)
6. Some Like It Hot (#11)
7. Friendly Persuasion (Did Not Place)
8. The Caine Mutiny (#80)
9. Sunset Blvd. (#3)
10. The Bridge on the River Kwai (#7)
11. 12 Angry Men (#1)
12. North by Northwest (#5)
13. The Nun’s Story (Did Not Place)
14. People Will Talk (#88)
15. Singin’ in the Rain (#10)
16. The Importance of Being Earnest (Did Not Place)
17. A Streetcar Named Desire (#19)
18. The Trouble with Harry (Did Not Place)
19. Night and Fog (#54)
20. Seven Samurai (#6)
21. Oklahoma! (#97)
22. The King and I (Did Not Place)
23. Guys and Dolls (Did Not Place)
24. The Big Country (#66)
25. Vertigo (#4)



Markís animation countdown ballot:


1. The Incredibles
2. Dumbo
3. Alice in Wonderland
4. Beauty and the Beast
5. Allegro non Troppo
6. Ratatouille
7. Pinocchio
8. Fantasia
9. Iron Giant
10. Toy Story
11. Nausicaš of the Valley of the Wind
12. The Hunchback of Notre Dame
13. Duck Amuck
14. Darkness Light Darkness
15. The Adventures of Prince Achmed
16. Vincent (1982)
17. The Nightmare Before Christmas
18. Grave of the Fireflies
19. The Little Mermaid
20. The Lion King
21. Up
22. How to Train Your Dragon
23. Rango
24. Mary and Max
25. Spirited Away



You ready? You look ready
I know I'll never be able to watch The Fountain again without thinking about how Mark didn't like it, but he knew I loved it, and I felt like he was far gentler in sharing his opinion of it because of that. He still totally shredded me, but something tells me he was holding back.

I went back and read one of my posts about it that he repped, and I'm kinda a wreck now.

Originally Posted by John McClane
Also, the ending where the fast/sudden cuts take place between all the 3 separate stories is square on with the way a person grieves the loss of a loved one. "Why? Could I have done more? Did I say everything that needed to be said?" Boom, boom, boom. It's all fast and irrational.
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"This is that human freedom, which all boast that they possess, and which consists solely in the fact, that men are conscious of their own desire, but are ignorant of the causes whereby that desire has been determined." -Baruch Spinoza