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I got for good luck my black tooth.
Originally Posted by Austruck
few Camus quotes was all that impressive, really. Interesting yes, and pleasantly so, but not overly impressive.
I never said it was impressive. I just found it interesting. Since they were so into the dumb, messy, emotional teen-angst asthetic, I found it suprising they would bother with any literary references at all. That's not meant to be a crack at The Cure either. They were great at what they did.
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I got for good luck my black tooth.
Originally Posted by Austruck
Hey, me too. I own several of their CDs, including Wish and Staring at the Sea. So, I'm also a fan.
Anyway, I finished the book this afternoon, and was kind of disappointed that it was just a launching pad for a bit of existential philosophy that wasn't even fully formed. I liked the sparse style, the way Camus used description so sparingly. It seemed he included just the right details at all times, so I thought the ending was going to be one that would hit hard and stay with me, but instead, he just trailed off after a bit of half-hearted pontificating.



Hello Salem, my name's Winifred. What's yours
I just bought Do Androids Dream Of Electronic Sheep? By Phillip K Dick - trying to see the differences between it and blade runner
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chicagofrog's Avatar
history *is* moralizing
very very different indeed
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We're a generation of men raised by women. I'm wondering if another woman is really the answer we need.



I got for good luck my black tooth.
Summer reading for AP English =

- The Metamorphoses by Franz Kafka
- Siddhartha by Herman Hesse
- Heros, Gods and Monsters of the Greek Myths by Bernard Evslin
- Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad
- Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
- "Oedipus Rex" by Sophocles
- "A Comedy of Errors" by William Shakespeare

Yet I can't start any of it, because I'm a quarter of the way through The American by Henry James.

What's everybody else got for summer assignments?



First Love by Ivan Turgenev



A system of cells interlinked
Just finished:

A Dirty Job (Christopher Moore) - Great stuff
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Chicks dig Lord of the Rings, Randal
Just finished A Death in Belmont - Sebastain Junger
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Just finished reading this:
Good Book


About to start this one:



wow looks like i haven't posted here since quitting nausea (which totally sucks). I've read several books since then: pnin and pale fire (by vladimir nabokov), decline and fall (waugh), the cold war (martin walker), mansfield park (austen), jekyll and hyde (stevenson), lies inc. (dick), the tempest, alice/through the looking glass (carroll/dodgson), and i'm sure i forgot to mention some others.

i've reread the boxman and hamlet.

the boxman is kobo abe's eliptical novel about men who chose to live as anonymous hermits in cardboard boxes. narrated by one such anonymous boxman (so he claims), a former photographer who is concerned about a mysterious scheming doctor/nurse duo trying to bribe him to destroy his box. this being an abe novel not many details are resolved (indeed, most end more murky and confused than at the start), and if you're looking for a kick-butt plot you should look elsewhere (what can one hope from a story involving a fraudulent-doctor trying to bribe a vagrant to throw away his home). i don't think this difficulty is due to laziness or craziness on abe's part though, but because of his constant attempt to move the line between what "actually happens", (the real) and what the boxman is merely conjecturing on the inner walls of his sanctum (the fake), and you can be sure any time something seems to be happening, abe will find some new way to undermine it's reality pretty soon. i'll be reading this again in a couple years.

everyone knows about hamlet, there's so much going on with this play that i won't bother covering it in a post, but one thing about it i noticed this last reading. there was an edition which had some review essay about hamlet's indecision and reading some rumination into the play on reaction versus thought (hamlet to ghost:
Haste me to know't, that I, with wings as swift
As meditation or the thoughts of love,
May sweep to my revenge.)
and while i found this explanation of hamlet's character compelling on my second read, i'm a bit ambivalent after my most recent (third) reading of the play, in which i notice that hamlet, generally so wimpy and wordy, in fact does thoughtlessly and ruthlessly murder the king at only the middle of the play (of course it turns out he gets the wrong guy), which would seem to at least wrinkle the argument some.

any thoughts on this, you resident shakespeare experts? of course i plan to keep going back to the play pretty often. it's not something to be digested in a mere three readings.



Should finish Michael Bamberger's The Man Who Heard Voices: Or, How M. Night Shyamalan Risked His Career on a Fairy Tale sometime this weekend.



Originally Posted by Strummer521
Anyway, I finished the book this afternoon, and was kind of disappointed that it was just a launching pad for a bit of existential philosophy that wasn't even fully formed. I liked the sparse style, the way Camus used description so sparingly. It seemed he included just the right details at all times, so I thought the ending was going to be one that would hit hard and stay with me, but instead, he just trailed off after a bit of half-hearted pontificating.
I disagree that it was ever supposed to be some kind of launch pad for existentialism -- the only real point that is stressed through the book is it's portayal of the meaninglessness of every event to Meursault. The book is a classic. Camus was a far too short-lived genius.