The Movie Forums Top 100 of All-Time Refresh: Countdown

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Would have been either The Natick Lowes or whatever cinema was in Shopper's World on Rt. 9, also in Natick, at the time. I want to say that was a General Cinemas, maybe? Those were the two I frequented back then.
I'm over in that area every week now but I never went to the movies there. We ought to hook up for dinner some time after winter and COVID. We're the same age too.



A system of cells interlinked
I'm over in that area every week now but I never went to the movies there. We ought to hook up for dinner some time after winter and COVID. We're the same age too.
Let's hope that is sooner, rather than later... This COVID thing just goes on and on!
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I like that explanation for Goodfellas, partially because it simultaneously explains why someone would love it and why it might feel "off" to them, since to some degree that's the point. I imagine any kind of deconstruction/subversion is a bit of a high-wire act in that regard.

I'm also okay with the protagonist being a scumbag, too, though Hill's single-mindedness makes the whole thing feel a little less like a story and a bit more like some kind of true crime documentary. Which I guess is kinda appropriate since it's based on a true story and all. It just creates some emotional distance in my case, and that's the kind of nitpicking we do between the great and very great, I suppose. It's why these lists are so agonizing.

Thanks for expounding.



Apocalypse Now didn't make my list, but it's my number 2 Coppola film. After watching Hearts of Darkness, I found that the film's surrealism and odd handling were actually a result of Coppola's uncertainty and stress while filming. I believe that affected his tevhnique overtime because his futurr films suffered.



I'm guessing Blade Runner as well.
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We've gone on holiday by mistake
Posted this channel before but this guy was a Capo in the 80's and is actually mentioned in the bar scene in Goodfellas, he knew the people involved well and it's always good to hear insight.

He talks about catching Henry Hill doing Coke in a toilet and telling him off, even though Hill wasn't part of his family, they had all been told about Hill's drug problems and to "take care of him" if they caught him but he let him off.

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minds his own damn business
Quick question for the group, perhaps a naive one: Why all the love for Goodfellas as a top-ten? I mean, I loved it myself and have rewatched it many times... but I wouldn't see it as a top-ten pick. What's the appeal? What makes it iconic or classic enough to make the top ten here? (Not disparaging--really, just asking.)
I had it a little lower on my list, but it's basically one of the modern masters at the peak of his powers and firing on all cylinders. The film itself is a performance. And there's a distinct before/after seismic shift when it landed in 1990. Is there another studio film from the 80s as densely electric as Goodfellas? That still refuses to seem dated? Casino does improve on this template in many ways, but it's still only an expansion of what Goodfellas created.
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INCEPPPPPP-----

Damn.

Just... damn.
Will laugh when Inception is 102 on the list.



minds his own damn business
Re: original vs. Redux, I agree with the general consensus that (whatever my issues with it) the original cut is preferable to the Redux cut. The added scenes work better individually than collectively and drag down the pace.
The pacing issue is the biggest problem, especially with the plantation scene. I like the plantation scene, and especially the Aurore Clement opium scene, but it has a structural problem. The scene would have been better to have come between the R&R outpost (the Clement scene would have been an effective contrast to the extended playmate scenes) and Du Lung Bridge, because once we cross the latter, it should be full steam ahead into the heart of darkness, and we have no time for an extended intermission. The problem is the inconsistency of Chief's funeral makes it difficultt to adjust.


But, officially, count me among those who has no problem with any act of the film. I think Kurtz is appropriately insane, and the ending appropriately primitive.



You guys are going to be super angry when Short Circuit cracks the top ten and I cackle with glee as I reveal it as my #1 film.
Yours too!?

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I'm down to give GoodFellas another shot.

Citizen Kane---Another one of those films I do a rewatch to. I found it well filmed and directed, but kind of cold to the touch when I saw it. But I think it's been over a decade?

Apocalypse Now---Saw this one just last year and it would make my top 100 easy even if I hadn't read Heart of Darkness as a high school student. The film dives into the absurdities of war as Willard and his team travel through the river in search of Kurtz. Whether it's surfing, the show featuring a Playmate, barter town or even when Johnson watches a battle while under the influence of LSD, the film manages to place us in one surreal scene after the next. And the quote game is fairly strong.

I'll wait to reveal my list until after number one drops.



Posted this channel before but this guy was a Capo in the 80's and is actually mentioned in the bar scene in Goodfellas, he knew the people involved well and it's always good to hear insight.

He talks about catching Henry Hill doing Coke in a toilet and telling him off, even though Hill wasn't part of his family, they had all been told about Hill's drug problems and to "take care of him" if they caught him but he let him off.

This may seem like a strange question, but did he have his own documentary made about him a few years ago?



Re: Goodfellas, I don't know how much it factors into my general lukewarm reaction to it; I mean, it shouldn't, but I pretty much hate every single character in it. I've always felt that is why I can't ultimately connect with the film beyond thinking "it's fun" or "it was good". I had a similar reaction to The Wolf of Wall Street and, to a lesser extent, to Casino. Most of Scorsese's films leave me the same way