100 Italian Movies Restored

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matt72582's Avatar
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I've seen handfuls on here, but if you have any favorites, please reply. Maybe we can discuss any movies that you think shouldn't be on the list, or movies that should be on the list.





https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/100_fi...ani_da_salvare

In chronological order:

Four Steps in the Clouds (Quattro passi fra le nuvole) by Alessandro Blasetti (1942)
Ossessione by Luchino Visconti (1943)
Rome, Open City (Roma cittŗ aperta) by Roberto Rossellini (1945)
Paisŗ by Roberto Rossellini (1946)
Shoeshine (Sciusciŗ) by Vittorio De Sica (1946)
L'onorevole Angelina by Luigi Zampa (1947)
Bicycle Thieves (Ladri di biciclette) by Vittorio De Sica (1948)
La terra trema by Luchino Visconti (1948)
Bitter Rice (Riso amaro) by Giuseppe De Santis (1949)
City of Pain (La cittŗ dolente) by Mario Bonnard (1949)
Heaven over the Marshes (Cielo sulla palude) by Augusto Genina (1949)
Stromboli, terra di Dio by Roberto Rossellini (1949)
Chains (Catene) by Raffaello Matarazzo (1949)
Path of Hope (Il cammino della speranza) by Pietro Germi (1950)
Sunday in August (Domenica d'agosto) by Luciano Emmer (1950)
Story of a Love Affair (Cronaca di un amore) by Michelangelo Antonioni (1950)
Variety Lights (Luci del varietŗ) by Alberto Lattuada and Federico Fellini (1950)
Father's Dilemma (Prima comunione) by Alessandro Blasetti (1950)
Bellissima by Luchino Visconti (1951)
Two Cents Worth of Hope (Due soldi di speranza) by Renato Castellani (1951)
Cops and Robbers (Guardie e ladri) by Steno e Mario Monicelli (1951)
Miracle in Milan (Miracolo a Milano) by Vittorio De Sica (1951)
La famiglia Passaguai by Aldo Fabrizi (1951)
Umberto D. by Vittorio De Sica (1952)
Europa '51 by Roberto Rossellini (1952)
The White Sheik (Lo sceicco bianco) by Federico Fellini (1952)
Toto in Color (TotÚ a colori) by Steno (1952)
Little World of Don Camillo. (Don Camillo) by Julien Duvivier (1952)
Bread, Love and Dreams (Pane, amore e fantasia) by Luigi Comencini (1953)
I vitelloni by Federico Fellini (1953)
Neapolitans in Milan (Napoletani a Milano) by Eduardo De Filippo (1953)
Eager to Live (Febbre di vivere) by Claudio Gora (1953)
The Wayward Wife (La provinciale) by Mario Soldati (1953)
Neapolitan Carousel (Carosello napoletano) by Ettore Giannini (1953)
Empty Eyes (Il sole negli occhi) by Antonio Pietrangeli (1953)
The Beach by Alberto Lattuada (1954)
The Gold of Naples (L'oro di Napoli) by Vittorio De Sica (1954)
An American in Rome (Un americano a Roma) by Steno (1954)
The Art of Getting Along (L'arte di arrangiarsi) by Luigi Zampa (1954)
Senso by Luchino Visconti (1954)
La strada by Federico Fellini (1954)
A Free Woman (Una donna libera) by Vittorio Cottafavi (1954)
The Abandoned (Gli sbandati) by Francesco Maselli (1955)
A Hero of Our Times (Un eroe dei nostri tempi) by Mario Monicelli (1955)
Poveri ma belli by Dino Risi (1956)
Il grido by Michelangelo Antonioni (1957)
Nights of Cabiria (Le notti di Cabiria) by Federico Fellini (1957)
Big Deal on Madonna Street (I soliti ignoti) by Mario Monicelli (1958)
You're on Your Own (Arrangiatevi!) by Mauro Bolognini (1959)
The Great War (La grande guerra) by Mario Monicelli (1959)
I magliari by Francesco Rosi (1959)
Everybody Go Home (Tutti a casa) by Luigi Comencini (1960)
La dolce vita by Federico Fellini (1960)
Rocco and His Brothers (Rocco e i suoi fratelli) by Luchino Visconti (1960)
Girl with a Suitcase (La ragazza con la valigia) by Valerio Zurlini (1960)
Long Night in 1943 (La lunga notte del '43) by Florestano Vancini (1960)
Il bell'Antonio by Mauro Bolognini (1960)
A Difficult Life (Una vita difficile) by Dino Risi (1961)
Divorce Italian Style (Divorzio all'italiana) by Pietro Germi (1961)
Il posto by Ermanno Olmi (1961)
Accattone by Pier Paolo Pasolini (1961)
Leoni al sole by Vittorio Caprioli (1961)
Il sorpasso by Dino Risi (1962)
Salvatore Giuliano by Francesco Rosi (1962)
L'eclisse by Michelangelo Antonioni (1962)
Mafioso by Alberto Lattuada (1962)
I mostri by Dino Risi (1963)
Hands over the City (Le mani sulla cittŗ) by Francesco Rosi (1963)
8Ĺ by Federico Fellini (1963)
The Leopard (Il Gattopardo) by Luchino Visconti (1963)
The Ape Woman (La donna scimmia) by Marco Ferreri (1963)
Chi lavora Ť perduto d by Tinto Brass (1963)
La vita agra by Carlo Lizzani (1964)
Fists in the Pocket (I pugni in tasca) by Marco Bellocchio (1965)
I Knew Her Well (Io la conoscevo bene) by Antonio Pietrangeli (1965)
Love Meetings (Comizi d'amore) by Pier Paolo Pasolini (1965)
The Birds, the Bees and the Italians (Signore & signori) by Pietro Germi (1966)
The Hawks and the Sparrows (Uccellacci e uccellini) by Pier Paolo Pasolini (1966)
The Battle of Algiers (La battaglia di Algeri) by Gillo Pontecorvo (1966)
China Is Near (La Cina Ť vicina) by Marco Bellocchio (1967)
Dillinger Is Dead (Dillinger Ť morto) by Marco Ferreri (1968)
Bandits in Milan (Banditi a Milano) by Carlo Lizzani (1968)
Be Sick... It's Free (Il medico della mutua) by Luigi Zampa (1968)
Investigation of a Citizen Above Suspicion (Indagine su un cittadino al di sopra di ogni sospetto by Elio Petri (1970)
The Conformist (Il conformista) by Bernardo Bertolucci (1970)
L'udienza by Marco Ferreri (1971)
Diario di un maestro by Vittorio De Seta (1972)
The Mattei Affair (Il caso Mattei) by Francesco Rosi (1972)
The Scientific Cardplayer (Lo scopone scientifico) by Luigi Comencini (1972)
Nel nome del padre by Marco Bellocchio (1972)
Amarcord by Federico Fellini (1974)
We All Loved Each Other So Much (C'eravamo tanto amati) by Ettore Scola (1974)
Bread and Chocolate (Pane e cioccolata) by Franco Brusati (1974)
Fantozzi by Luciano Salce (1975)
1900 (Novecento) by Bernardo Bertolucci (1976)
Illustrious Corpses (Cadaveri eccellenti) by Francesco Rosi (1976)
A Special Day (Una giornata particolare) by Ettore Scola (1977)
An Average Little Man (Un borghese piccolo piccolo) by Mario Monicelli (1977)
Padre padrone by Paolo and Vittorio Taviani (1977)
The Tree of Wooden Clogs (L'albero degli zoccoli) by Ermanno Olmi (1978)



This is a little embarrassing. Just 18/100 seen.

Ossessione by Luchino Visconti (1943)
Rome, Open City (Roma cittŗ aperta) by Roberto Rossellini (1945)
Paisŗ by Roberto Rossellini (1946)
Bicycle Thieves (Ladri di biciclette) by Vittorio De Sica (1948)
Stromboli, terra di Dio by Roberto Rossellini (1949)
Umberto D. by Vittorio De Sica (1952)
I vitelloni by Federico Fellini (1953)
La strada by Federico Fellini (1954)
Nights of Cabiria (Le notti di Cabiria) by Federico Fellini (1957)
La dolce vita by Federico Fellini (1960)
Rocco and His Brothers (Rocco e i suoi fratelli) by Luchino Visconti (1960)
Salvatore Giuliano by Francesco Rosi (1962)
L'eclisse by Michelangelo Antonioni (1962)
8Ĺ by Federico Fellini (1963)
The Leopard (Il Gattopardo) by Luchino Visconti (1963)
The Battle of Algiers (La battaglia di Algeri) by Gillo Pontecorvo (1966)
The Conformist (Il conformista) by Bernardo Bertolucci (1970)
Amarcord by Federico Fellini (1974)



Iíve only seen 12 myself, although a few of them (like Bitter Rice) I was already planning on getting to presently. And, looking at the Italian movies I have seen, a lot of them tend to skew somewhat more lowbrow (I love gialli and anything with a Morricone score) and Neorealism is usually a bit dry for my tastes.

Of those I have seen, though, La Strada is easily my favorite (and itís my favorite Fellini as well). Divorce Italian Style is also a real standout from the bunch (Iím usually not especially invested in comedies, but this one really sang for me). And while Neorealism is admittedly not my usual thing, I ended up enjoying Bicycle Thieves and Rome, Open City a lot more than I would have thought.

Really, I canít say that I overtly disliked any of the ones Iíve seen thus far, although I was a bit cold towards Nights of Cabiria (which homestly surprised me after loving La Strada so much).



Also answers to Jabba
It is a bit weird to see The Battle of Algiers in this list, as it doesn't take place in Italy, nor is any Italian spoken in it. I do get the connection, but its inclusion is still a bit iffy.

A measly 13% for me, but with quite a few more on my radar that I will get to at some point.

PS. For those with an IMDb account, a quicker way to check your I-tally is here.



matt72582's Avatar
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Ouch, only 36/100, and I consider the Italians the best in film per capita (and the US is total, but still near the top per capita)


I heard of a few, and know the directors. Maybe some are available on TV on-demand. I've been wanting to see a movie for days...


EDIT: Thanks for the IMDB list! They usually have a listing underneath each movie on where to see it.



The trick is not minding
Ouch, only 36/100, and I consider the Italians the best in film per capita (and the US is total, but still near the top per capita).

I need to go through it but a casual glance didnít look too promising in regards to films viewed by me.

I have Italy at #3 all time in terms of cinema, but thatís still decent considering all the countries in the world.

1. Japan
2. France
3. Italy
4. Germany
5. Soviet Union/Russia
6. Britain/USA



So I am going through the Italian Neo-Realism collection on the Criterion Channel and finally saw Bitter Rice (from near the top of this list). I liked it more than a lot of Neo-Realist movies Iíve seen (which can tend to be a bit dry of a watch, regardless of their other qualities). Actually, I found myself far more engaged with the internal politics of Rice plantersí Union/anti-Union factions than I did with the more commercial elements (like a hotel heist gone wrong, thieves on the run and a big chance payout on the rice crop), but I imagine that for a lot of people itís the spoon full of sugar that helps the medicine go down. Iíd definitely recommend it for anybody looking to see a few more movies from this list.



matt72582's Avatar
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So I am going through the Italian Neo-Realism collection on the Criterion Channel and finally saw Bitter Rice (from near the top of this list). I liked it more than a lot of Neo-Realist movies Iíve seen (which can tend to be a bit dry of a watch, regardless of their other qualities). Actually, I found myself far more engaged with the internal politics of Rice plantersí Union/anti-Union factions than I did with the more commercial elements (like a hotel heist gone wrong, thieves on the run and a big chance payout on the rice crop), but I imagine that for a lot of people itís the spoon full of sugar that helps the medicine go down. Iíd definitely recommend it for anybody looking to see a few more movies from this list.

This is one Italian neo-realist I haven't seen.. De Sica and Visconti are my favorites, too, but unfortunately, no Criterion channel. I'll try to put an automatic record on my cable with the director's name - Giuseppe De Santis.



Society ennobler, last seen in Medici's Florence
It is hard to believe they've omitted such a masterpiece as Vittorio De Sica's
Ieri oggi domani [Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow] (1963).

__________________
"Population don't imitate art, population imitate bad television." W.A.
"You can't depend on your eyes when your imagination is out of focus." M.T.



but unfortunately, no Criterion channel.
Thatís a shame. It really is an incredible resource for older / international / well-regarded films. Is it because youíre not based in the US, or have you simply opted to not pay for it every month?

I watched another one from the list: de Sicaís Umberto D. It plays out very similarly to Bicycle Thieves, only here with an old man and his dog trying to scrape up enough money to pay off their landlord for another month. Like de Sicaís other films, it has a strong sense of its characters, setting and core narrative, which I think puts it ahead of a lot of his Neo-Realist contemporaries (a lot of whose work always struck me as rather dry watches). I ended up liking this one a lot more than I thought I would.



matt72582's Avatar
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Thatís a shame. It really is an incredible resource for older / international / well-regarded films. Is it because youíre not based in the US, or have you simply opted to not pay for it every month?

I watched another one from the list: de Sicaís Umberto D. It plays out very similarly to Bicycle Thieves, only here with an old man and his dog trying to scrape up enough money to pay off their landlord for another month. Like de Sicaís other films, it has a strong sense of its characters, setting and core narrative, which I think puts it ahead of a lot of his Neo-Realist contemporaries (a lot of whose work always struck me as rather dry watches). I ended up liking this one a lot more than I thought I would.

It's not available unfortunately, but I do have TCM, and they show some far-out stuff in their "Underground" series.


"Umberto D" is another great one. "Vittorio D" is a great documentary on De Sica, divided into sections of his life (person, director, actor, father, etc) which I saw on Prime or a 3rd party streaming through them.


I thought it was so funny when Umberto needs change, so he buys a glass, then throws it so nonchalantly to the ground, he doesn't even notice it breaking. My brother pointed this out to me, and I found it funny, too.


Have you seen "Sunflower"? I think it's the best love story on film. Sophia Loren and Marcello Mastroianni (who worked with De Sica a combined dozen times I think) are amazing together in this, and it's just great.. A few other great ones of this that go under the radar are "The Roof"? Or "A Brief Vacation"



Have you seen "Sunflower"? I think it's the best love story on film. Sophia Loren and Marcello Mastroianni (who worked with De Sica a combined dozen times I think) are amazing together in this, and it's just great.. A few other great ones of this that go under the radar are "The Roof"? Or "A Brief Vacation"
I havenít seen any of those (Iíll definitely keep an eye out for them going forward, though). I really havenít seen too much de Sica in general, just Bicycle Thieves, Umberto D., Shoeshine and The Children Are Watching Us. I have liked what Iíve seen of his work a lot, though.



matt72582's Avatar
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I havenít seen any of those (Iíll definitely keep an eye out for them going forward, though). I really havenít seen too much de Sica in general, just Bicycle Thieves, Umberto D., Shoeshine and The Children Are Watching Us. I have liked what Iíve seen of his work a lot, though.

"Two Women" is another great one. Sophia Loren is in that, too.



matt72582's Avatar
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I was bored at work today so in case anyone wants to keep track of their progress for this, I made a custom list.

Cool and thank you!


I also found this. It's helpful if you keep track of your scores. The only thing is that some Italian movies have alternate titles, and translated


https://www.imdb.com/list/ls052150345



Speaking of this list (I am SO glad you posted this), if anyone has a link to watch A Free Woman with English subtitles, please senf it to me. After seeing Vittorio Cottafavi's two movies on MST3K, I wanted to find more of his movies.



matt72582's Avatar
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Speaking of this list (I am SO glad you posted this), if anyone has a link to watch A Free Woman with English subtitles, please senf it to me. After seeing Vittorio Cottafavi's two movies on MST3K, I wanted to find more of his movies.

Here you go.





That's a fanmade edit. I'd rather watch a movie the way the director or distributor planned it. Also, I always check the major streaming sources before I ask for a movie, especially a rare one.



I finished the Italian Neorealism collection that I was working through, which means that Iíve now also seen I Vitelloni (1953,
), Rocco and His Brothers (1960,
), Il Posto (1961,
) and Salvatore Giulino (1962,
).

Generally speaking, I liked them all quite a bit, most quite a bit more than I would have expected. My favorite of these was probably Rocco and His Brothers, although Il Posto felt extremely true to my early experiences of hunting and keeping a job. Thereís definitely a lot to recommend from here (and the list more generally) from what Iíve been able to gather thus far.



matt72582's Avatar
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That's a fanmade edit. I'd rather watch a movie the way the director or distributor planned it. Also, I always check the major streaming sources before I ask for a movie, especially a rare one.

There was another video on YouTube, but not sure if it's exactly what you're looking for. But there's a great possibility the correct subtitles are online somewhere.



I was thinking about watching it, but not with shoddy translations.