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No Country For Old Men (2007) - Coen's Brothers



- My 2nd favorite movie from The Coen's and also one hell of a great ride. Entertaining, Nice atmosphere and brilliant casting. Bardem is one of my favorite vilain and it's by far his best performance to date. The ending is awesome and highly recommended flick.

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Mad Max fury road 9/10



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The Servant (1963)

A psychological drama that was much darker and more sinister than I expected. Dirk Bogarde, who was excellent, stars as a servant recently employed by playboy Tony, James Fox, and we watch as the manservant's intentions become distrubingly clearer.

I did enjoy this and would recommend watching for the 60's list but it was quite slow in parts -
+
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The Human Bullet
Kihachi Okamoto - 1968



A brilliant commentary of the absurdities of war culture and blind patriotism and the tone is absolutely perfect, balancing comedy and drama with ease and a lighthearted feel that doesn't go as far as to undermine the dire situation. Fun dialog, pleasant score and a fantastic main character also help make "The Human Bullet" a new favourite.




The Incident (1967)


The movie opens with two young thugs raising hell in the streets one night, and they end up beating and robbing an older man. They wind up on the subway where they terrorize a car full of passengers. I enjoyed this more than I rated it as it's the kind of movie I go for, but there were issues with it that I just can't overlook. It's filmed with a low budget quality, which is good because it adds a gritty realism, but the sound quality was poor. My next issue was the character introduction/development of the innocent passengers. It shows each of them in the minutes before boarding the train; I like that, but it went on too long. My main issue was that I just didn't buy into "the incident". The two guys terrorizing the passengers are not carrying guns; one of them is carrying a knife, but he doesn't pull it until there's about five minutes left in the movie. I didn't believe for a second that about 15 passengers, including some guys who are as tough or tougher than the bad guys, would allow this to go on for so long without fighting back. I just did not buy it. I think the movie was trying to send a message about how some people have a lack of empathy towards others, and I think with that it succeeded. It's got a pretty decent cast with Martin Sheen, Beau Bridges, Brock Peters, Thelma Ritter, Tony Musante, Donna Reed, Ruby Dee, and Ed McMahon.




Care for some gopher?
The Lost World: Jurassic Park (USA, 1997, Steven Spielberg) -


Phew, i happend to like this movie. But this time... boy, the script is terrible! Almost as terrible as the one from MiB II. Everything that happens, happens out of convinience. Not much logic in here. The ending is cool, though.
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My main issue was that I just didn't buy into "the incident". The two guys terrorizing the passengers are not carrying guns; one of them is carrying a knife, but he doesn't pull it until there's about five minutes left in the movie. I didn't believe for a second that about 15 passengers, including some guys who are as tough or tougher than the bad guys, would allow this to go on for so long without fighting back. I just did not buy it.]
I've not seen this, but experiments have consistently shown that the more people there are about, the less likely anyone is to do anything to intervene. That's not to say that people don't, of course, just that it's less likely.
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I've not seen this, but experiments have consistently shown that the more people there are about, the less likely anyone is to do anything to intervene. That's not to say that people don't, of course, just that it's less likely.
I can see that to a point, but these people wouldn't even defend themselves.



Master of My Domain
The Umbrellas of Cherbourg (1964)



I would have absolutely loved this film... if it wasn't a musical. Not because I don't like musicals in general, but in The Umbrellas of Cherbourg constant singing felt more like a distraction, Even though some of them were brilliant the majority was not. On the other hand, I enjoyed the color and ending.

+



L'Eclisse (1962)


With the slight exception of Red Desert, I've struggled with the films of director Michelangelo Antonioni. This one wasn't so bad for me as far as being difficult to sit through. Besides the beauty that's been evident in all of the movies I've seen of his, I enjoyed this at least a little bit. I haven't been impressed with Alain Delon, but I do like Monica Vitti. I enjoyed a few scenes and liked how it ended, but I couldn't connect in any way.




Thane of Glamis, Thane of Cawdor, & King Hereafter
Continuing on the Harry Potter franchise:

Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban: 10/10 - Loved it all from the acting and story to the sound, the music, and the effects!

Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire: 6/10 - So much potential wasted. If they stuck closer to the book, it could've been a solid 8-9/10!



Manthan/ The Churning (1976) - Shyam Benegal



A very nice film about a Govt. Officer whose mission is to set up a Milk Co-Operative society in a remote Indian village (a society that will be owned by the villagers themselves and which will give them higher price for their milk than what they get from the local landlord)...but the arrival of the Govt. Officer opens up direct conflict with the landlords and those who benefit from the cheap price of milk...excellent drama...

9 out of 10
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Garam Hawa/ Scorching Winds (1975) - M. S. Sathyu



Another fascinating account of an Indian Muslim family just after India's independence (you can call it partition as well). The film is about the dilemma of this family (or precisely of the oldest member of the family, who has lived all his life in India and now absolutely reluctant to move to Pakistan, just because he is a Muslim). Slowly but surely his close relatives (brothers, sons, daughters) leave for Pakistan because of the unequal treatment they receive in India in every sphere of life...An amazing film, what, for me, it truly depicts is the fact that when Pakistan became a separate country it clearly demonstrated that it was a country for the Muslims, where there will be job opportunities and other benefits for the Muslims only (benefits that they would never get if they chose to live in India because in India the Muslims will always be suppressed and dominated)...but unlike Pakistan, India called itself a secular country (a term that we are still proud of), which meant there will be no discrimination among different castes or religions (well, honestly, India was never a "secular" country, and probably it will never be...). This film depicts this haunting reality with commitment and seriousness...

9.5 out of 10