The Personal Recommendation Hall of Fame

Tools    





There is 1 tie. Since I already know the results, someone tell me how to break it. For instance, 1st tiebreaker should be who has the most first place votes, but they have the same amount. What's next?



Just getting into the spirit of things
Most 2nd place votes?

Feel free to iggy me though if you want, I ain't got no wooflehound in this fight
__________________
2016 • 2017 • 2018 • 2019 • 2020
Noms
Pre-1930 Countdown


Almost famous for having nailed Madonna once



28 days...6 hours...42 minutes...12 seconds
A good documentary that kept my interest throughout. Thanks to whomever nominated it for me.
That would be me....
__________________
"A laugh can be a very powerful thing. Why, sometimes in life, it's the only weapon we have."

Suspect's Reviews



Think you used enough dynamite there, Butch?
THANKS usual. It takes a lot for me to check out a documentary and I would have easily bypassed this one, on my own. So, considering how well they told the story, this was a very good watch.
__________________
They say: that after people make love there's a kind of melancholia, the petite mort, the little death. Well, I'm here to tell you, after a romantic night with yourself there's a very acute sensation of failed suicide. ~Dylan Moran



8 out of the 13 members received at least one first place vote. 4 members didn't receive a 1st or a 2nd.
14 members I mean. I keep thinking of how many movies we each had to watch. 2 members got 3 first place votes each.



So I never guessed who nominated or asked who nominated what.

Citizen nominated Dial M For Murder and I knew Capt. Spaulding's rec before it was even announced.
These were my guesses after I sent in my ballot:

Pandora's Box – Frightened Inmate No. 2
Princess Mononoke – ahwell
Le Trou – Edarsenol
Gattaca - Siddon
Grizzly Man – Wyldesyde19
Blair Witch – Hashtag Brownies
The Long Goodbye – The Usual Suspect
Bigger Than Life – Cricket
The Hidden - John Connor
Invasion of the Body Snatchers - Neiba

I did this list at the beginning of.... April? At the time I felt pretty confident about my guesses now, 4 months later, I feel a little "huh-buhhhh". Aside from Capt.'s nom the only other one I felt that I had pegged was Mary and Max (Miss Vicky) which she confirmed . I thought I had Princess Mononoke (I thought Ahwell) pegged as well but was thrown a curveball. Touche'. This was an OUTSTANDING HoF and can't wait for the next. Thanks Cricket!



Think you used enough dynamite there, Butch?
So I never guessed who nominated or asked who nominated what.

Citizen nominated Dial M For Murder and I knew Capt. Spaulding's rec before it was even announced.
These were my guesses after I sent in my ballot:

Pandora's Box – Frightened Inmate No. 2
Princess Mononoke – ahwell
Le Trou – Edarsenol
Gattaca - Siddon
Grizzly Man – Wyldesyde19
Blair Witch – Hashtag Brownies
The Long Goodbye – The Usual Suspect
Bigger Than Life – Cricket
The Hidden - John Connor
Invasion of the Body Snatchers - Neiba

I did this list at the beginning of.... April? At the time I felt pretty confident about my guesses now, 4 months later, I feel a little "huh-buhhhh". Aside from Capt.'s nom the only other one I felt that I had pegged was Mary and Max (Miss Vicky) which she confirmed . I thought I had Princess Mononoke (I thought Ahwell) pegged as well but was thrown a curveball. Touche'. This was an OUTSTANDING HoF and can't wait for the next. Thanks Cricket!
I did terrible in guessing who nominated what for me, so I totally feel your pain lol
I nominated Gattaca for you.



These were my guesses after I sent in my ballot:

Pandora's Box – Frightened Inmate No. 2
Princess Mononoke – ahwell
Le Trou – Edarsenol
Gattaca - Siddon
Grizzly Man – Wyldesyde19
Blair Witch – Hashtag Brownies
The Long Goodbye – The Usual Suspect
Bigger Than Life – Cricket
The Hidden - John Connor
Invasion of the Body Snatchers - Neiba


19 hours till reveal..





Amadeus
(Milos Forman, 1984)


This is a perfect example of why you should never judge a movie by its subject matter. A three-hour period piece revolving around classical music and pompous white dudes in powdered wigs sounds like a fall-asleep-at-your-desk history lesson, but thankfully director Milos Forman is more focused on entertaining than educating. Amadeus isn't concerned with historical accuracy. It doesn't require knowledge or interest in classical music. This isn't even really a biopic, despite being billed as one. It is instead a symphony of professional jealousy. An opera of ruinous hubris. Two historical figures -- Mozart and Salieri -- resurrected on screen to serve as instruments to themes more timeless than even their own musical legacies, their in-script rivalry concocted from ancient rumors, facts be damned, in pursuit of maximum viewer investment.

I know nothing of the real-life Salieri, but Antonio Salieri, movie character, is a talented composer with a prestigious role within the Emperor's palace. At an early age Salieri made a vow with God to become a famous composer in exchange for faithful servitude, and he has kept that promise, never succumbing to earthly pleasures in order to commit one-hundred percent of his energy into his life's sole purpose: musical composition. Then into the palace strolls Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. Again: I know little of the actual person, but the Mozart of the movie strikes a modern figure despite the eighteenth-century attire. A rock star of his era: boastful, rebellious, hedonistic. The pious Salieri watches with contempt as the wanton prodigy hurls himself toward every heaving bosom. How can God have chosen as his instrument such a godless young man when he, Salieri, has spent so much time praying and obeying God's laws?

I love that Mozart is oblivious to Salieri's intense resentment. Here is his antagonist, a man attempting to orchestrate his death, yet Mozart repeatedly seeks Salieri for confidence and counsel. Since we're privy to Salieri's thoughts and actions, the one-on-one interactions between the musical icons are compelling and chilling, as insidious intent festers beneath dignified facades. The film's deepest conflict isn't between dueling composers, however, but between Salieri and his God. Ego vs. faith. Entitlement vs. reward. Throw the crucifix into the fire. Destroy God's musical incarnation.

Amadeus won eight Oscar statuettes, most of them justified. Every detail is exquisite: art direction, costume design, set construction, makeup (particularly the old-age effects). Obviously the soundtrack is magnificent. Performances are equally impressive. Just pure cinematic opulence in every category. All the prestige without the accompanying stuffiness. I'm happy that I chose the director's cut so that I was able to witness the emancipation of Elizabeth Berridge's glorious breasts from the confinement of her corset. (And the omission of that scene would've sapped all the power from her scathing "servant" remark near the end of the film.) I was never bored or disinterested despite my indifference toward the subject matter and the time period. That's a testament to everyone involved with the production. I might even add some Mozart to my playlist while I'm still awash in the movie's richness.

__________________



Think you used enough dynamite there, Butch?

Amadeus
(Milos Forman, 1984)


This is a perfect example of why you should never judge a movie by its subject matter. A three-hour period piece revolving around classical music and pompous white dudes in powdered wigs sounds like a fall-asleep-at-your-desk history lesson, but thankfully director Milos Forman is more focused on entertaining than educating. Anyone basing their research on this film is likely to receive a failing grade. Amadeus isn't concerned with historical accuracy. It doesn't require knowledge or interest in classical music. (Thank God, because my ignorant eardrums can't differentiate between Mozart, Beethoven or a five-year-old banging his fists on piano keys.) This isn't even really a biopic, despite being billed as one. It is instead a symphony of professional jealousy. An opera of ruinous hubris. Two historical figures -- Mozart and Salieri -- resurrected on screen to serve as instruments to themes more timeless than even their own musical legacies, their in-script rivalry concocted from ancient rumors, facts be damned, in pursuit of maximum viewer investment.

Hone your skills. Train. Study. Invest. Yet no matter your talent, or your drive, or your passion, the sad fact remains: you'll never be the best. Some of us embrace that reality, striving to fulfill our personal potential while putting aside fantasies of world-renowned greatness. Others wilt in the shadow of genius. Why pen a sentence if it will always pale in comparison to the literary greats? Why bother dribbling a ball if your jersey will never hang from the rafters? Is it not a waste of time to write a melody when your ability is dwarfed by your peers? I know nothing of the real-life Salieri, but Antonio Salieri, movie character, is a talented composer with a prestigious role within the Emperor's palace. At an early age Salieri made a vow with God to become a famous composer in exchange for faithful servitude, and he has kept that promise, never succumbing to earthly pleasures in order to commit one-hundred percent of his energy into his life's sole purpose: musical composition. Then into the palace strolls Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. Again: I know little of the actual person, but the Mozart of the movie strikes a modern figure despite the eighteenth-century attire. A rock star of his era: boastful, rebellious, hedonistic. The pious Salieri watches with contempt as the wanton prodigy hurls himself toward every heaving bosom. How can God have chosen as his instrument such a godless young man when he, Salieri, has spent so much time praying and obeying God's laws?

I love that Mozart is clueless to Salieri's intense resentment. Here is his antagonist, a man attempting to orchestrate his death, yet Mozart repeatedly seeks Salieri for confidence and counsel. Since we're privy to Salieri's thoughts and actions, the one-on-one interactions between the musical icons are compelling and chilling, as insidious intent festers beneath dignified facades. The film's deepest conflict isn't between dueling composers, however, but between Salieri and his God. Ego vs. faith. Entitlement vs. reward. Throw the crucifix into the fire. Destroy God's musical incarnation. Amadeus won eight Oscar statuettes, most of them justified. Every detail is exquisite: art direction, costume design, set construction, makeup (particularly the old-age effects). Obviously the soundtrack is magnificent. Performances are equally impressive. Just pure cinematic opulence in every category. I'm happy that I chose the director's cut so that I was able to witness the emancipation of Elizabeth Berridge's glorious breasts from the confinement of her corset. (And the omission of that scene would've sapped all the power from her scathing "servant" remark near the end of the film.) I was never bored or disinterested despite my indifference toward the subject matter and the time period. That's a testament to everyone involved with the production. I might even add some Mozart to my playlist while I'm still awash in the movie's richness.

I think my above gif about looking forward to the reveal can double for reading this.
Huge HUGE fan of this movie and my last viewing during the Musical Artist HoF was the first time with the Director's Cut which I'm pretty glad you checked it because the additions, including " the emancipation of Elizabeth Berridge's glorious breasts from the confinement of her corset." IS the way to view this film that you described very aptly.



I was hoping to review Funny Games before the reveal tonight, but clearly that's not going to happen. Maybe tomorrow.

I'm assuming @Wyldesyde19 nominated Amadeus, since he's the last person I haven't guessed. (I know Hashtag nominated Funny Games based on comments I've seen him make about the film.) The replacement nomination, Grand Illusion, wasn't readily available to me. (I've noticed it on The Criterion Channel in the past, but apparently it's been cycled from their streaming catalog at the current moment.) Citizen hooked me up with a HD link to Amadeus weeks ago, and I finally took the time to figure out how to watch it on my TV instead of resorting to my laptop. I know this is a beloved film by many in this HOF, including @ahwell and @Hey Fredrick, so I figured people would be more interested in reading a review for this than Grand Illusion anyway.

Already I realize that I forgot to mention the structure of the narrative, which I think goes a long way toward maintaining the viewers' interest. Excellent usage of the unreliable narrator (and likely the reason that Mozart's laugh is portrayed as a dorky, off-putting spasm). Also, it's hard not to view the last scene as somewhat of a reference to the director's One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest.