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Sleep Has Her House (2017, Scott Barley)

Stumbled upon this film recently... wow, what a brilliant piece of filmmaking. Loved the shapeshifting, liquid quality of it.. the way it played with darkness and light, and the hypnotic textures of its compositions. The static long takes had that "stare into the abyss, the abyss stares back at you" effectónot that it was particularly disturbing or terrifying (aside from those apocalyptic last fifteen minutes or so) but the longer the film went on, the more I became aware of a vague sense of menace mixed with unspeakable awe emanating from this otherworldly, human-less nowhere-land I was witnessing. Was it an artistic depiction of the mystery of night, a glimpse of a post-human Earth drawing toward its last days, or merely a dream being dreamt by a woman alluded to in the title?

Definitely one of the most visually transporting experiences I've had in recent years, this is experimental cinema at its finest.



Professional horse shoe straightener

Sleep Has Her House (2017, Scott Barley)

Stumbled upon this film recently... wow, what a brilliant piece of filmmaking. Loved the shapeshifting, liquid quality of it.. the way it played with darkness and light, and the hypnotic textures of its compositions. The static long takes had that "stare into the abyss, the abyss stares back at you" effectónot that it was particularly disturbing or terrifying (aside from those apocalyptic last fifteen minutes or so) but the longer the film went on, the more I became aware of a vague sense of menace emanating from this otherworldly, human-less world I was witnessing. Was it an artistic depiction of the mystery of night, a glimpse of a post-human Earth drawing toward its last days, or merely a dream being dreamt by a woman alluded to in the title?

Definitely one of the most visually transporting experiences I've had in recent years, this is experimental cinema at its finest.
Hey, is this a documentary? Or art house film?



Hey, is this a documentary? Or art house film?
Seems a mixture of both and looks really interesting! Welsh filmmaker too. Has got really high praise from some people I follow on MUBI too. Definitely gonna check it out soon
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Zombieland (2009)


Still one of my favorite movies of that era. The pace, humor, action, and everything are just right on target for me. Extraordinary casting.

Lyle,Lyle Crocodile (2022)


This had strange CGI vibes in the same way the Clifford remake a year or two ago did. This one has a little more charm and balance in my opinion though. Javier Bardem played his part well. I do think they could have found a better crocodile voice than Shawn Mendes....



I forgot the opening line.

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Bullet Train - (2022)

I wasn't all that eager to watch Bullet Train last year, but I wasn't averse to the idea. It seems to come from the Guy Ritchie school of dark murder-comedy, with cartoonish action thrown in thanks to what CGI can do these days. Brad Pitt is doing his best to take things seriously, ironically in a comedic sense - he's one of the best things about the film, along with a string of cameos and small parts from notable superstars such as Sandra Bullock, Channing Tatum and Ryan Reynolds. The entire story unfolds on a bullet train taking all of the characters from Tokyo to Kyoto, and I have to say that it's moderately entertaining and funny. I never really feel like criticizing a film too much if it's been a pleasant enough diversion for a couple of hours, but I have to say that filmmakers are getting carried away with what they can do with computers and the whole 'Bigger - Better - Brighter - Louder - More Destructive' credo isn't doing much for me. I like films - even the goofy ones - to have some semblance of reality. When characters survive 20 story falls or megaton explosions it's basically a cartoon. It's not one of the best films of 2022, but for me it's not a bad one either - I don't go out of my way to see these mainstream action-comedies, but if I happen to be around when one is playing, or need to see one for some kind of competition I don't mind watching.

6/10


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E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial - (1982)

When I was a kid, I loved films like Raiders of the Lost Ark, Star Wars, Jaws, The Shining and An American Werewolf in London - so when E.T. came out I thought it was too soft-hearted, sentimental and childish for my sensibilities. When I see it now I think it's one of the all time great children's films, and a wonderful look at friendship and love which has more 'on the verge of tears' moments than you can poke a stick at. The score from John Williams helps, as does Spielberg's knack for capturing 'wonder' - although I can't help wonder why the creative team behind it made E.T. so ugly.

9/10
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My movie ratings often go up or down a point or two after more reflection, research and rewatches.

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Hey, is this a documentary? Or art house film?
The latter.

I wouldn't recommend it to anyone who 1) hates slow arthouse movies without plot or action and 2) doesn't have patience for static long shots (worth noting also that most of what is shown in the film takes place at night, in the dark).



Professional horse shoe straightener
The latter.

I wouldn't recommend it to anyone who 1) hates slow arthouse movies without plot or action and 2) doesn't have patience for static long shots (worth noting also that most of what is shown in the film takes place at night, in the dark).
Thanks, sounds right up my street. It's tagged as horror on IMDB so that threw me a bit. Will check it out.



Thanks, sounds right up my street. It's tagged as horror on IMDB so that threw me a bit. Will check it out.
Yeah it's not a "horror" film - in fact, I wouldn't be able to pinpoint a specific genre. It's whatever you see in it or make of it.. could be horror, could be a lot of other things.



Subtle Slayer of Normies
Yeah it's not a "horror" film - in fact, I wouldn't be able to pinpoint a specific genre. It's whatever you see in it or make of it.. could be horror, could be a lot of other things.
It's a Remodernist Film, apparently.

Remodernist film is a movement started by Jesse Richards and Peter Rinaldi in the early 2000s, harkening back to the ideas of modernism, which "calls for a return to emotional and spiritual meaning in cinema, as well as an emphasis on new ideas of narrative structure and subjectivity". Working alongside the Remodernist and Stuckist art movements, film-makers attempt to show their work through a much more emotional construct in a desire to break down the post-modernist idealisms prevalent in current art. The films are meant to showcase the idea of complete subjectivity, moving away from the concreteness of post-modernism and the idea of "style" over "substance".
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I apologize for any and all perceived slights which I did not intend to send your way. Sincerely. If someone reads a different tone, then they cannot but also read a different message. And as for those slights which I did intend, well you probably deserved those. Let's be honest. You're not exactly a picture of moderation.





Re-watch. Not bad. Kinda silly.




Re-watch of a classic of Belgian cinema. Very good movie from the Dardenne brothers.
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The Burmese Harp (1956)




Japanese war film that was not only beautiful to look at, but to listen to with the harp and the singing. I'm really not into monk stuff but this film has a lot going for it and it left me with a peaceful feeling. There are members here that will appreciate it even more.




Sleep Has Her House (2017, Scott Barley)

Stumbled upon this film recently... wow, what a brilliant piece of filmmaking. Loved the shapeshifting, liquid quality of it.. the way it played with darkness and light, and the hypnotic textures of its compositions. The static long takes had that "stare into the abyss, the abyss stares back at you" effectónot that it was particularly disturbing or terrifying (aside from those apocalyptic last fifteen minutes or so) but the longer the film went on, the more I became aware of a vague sense of menace mixed with unspeakable awe emanating from this otherworldly, human-less nowhere-land I was witnessing. Was it an artistic depiction of the mystery of night, a glimpse of a post-human Earth drawing toward its last days, or merely a dream being dreamt by a woman alluded to in the title?

Definitely one of the most visually transporting experiences I've had in recent years, this is experimental cinema at its finest.
I love the title. Very poetic.



I forgot the opening line.

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The Outfit - (2022)

One of The Outfit's most striking features is how it stays anchored to one location, and basically three rooms - you'd swear it was based on a play, and although it isn't, perhaps screenwriter Johnathan McClain and director/cowriter Graham Moore intended for it to be one. Perhaps they realised just how much tension can be wrung from the high drama and psychological aspects of the film if we stay in the one location. It's 1956. Cutter (not tailor!) Leonard Burling (Mark Rylance) allows Chicago gangsters to use his shop as a drop box for messages, and when it's discovered there's a rat amongst them, both internal and external warfare erupts. Burling is close to head figure Roy Boyle (Simon Russell Beale) and when his son, Richie (Dylan O'Brien) is dragged in wounded, Burling becomes an unwilling participant of murder and subterfuge. It's all really finely tuned and I really enjoyed most of what I saw - but I was somewhat dissatisfied with the film's ending, where a few of those damned big twists that have become so common these days kind of took things from the realm of the possible to the highly questionable. All in all though, I had a good time. Rylance rarely gets a chance to be the lead in any film, and he's always been a very noticeable component of all the films he's been in.

7/10


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Jackass 4.5 - (2022)

Have you ever read the "injuries" section on Wikipedia when perusing a Jackass film? The ruptures, infections, burns, broken bones and concussions read like the team were involved in a plane crash. I do watch the movies for those moments that make me scream "Oh no!" so loud I'm probably waking my neighbours up, and I get a good laugh a lot of the time - but the one factor that I love the most from Jackass is the friendship and camaraderie this group has. I've never seen a bunch of guys as close to each other as these are, and that's probably because their oversharing and destruction of boundaries goes beyond anything you could possibly dream up. I haven't seen Jackass Fore♥er, but watching Jackass 4.5 really put me in the mood and I'll have to get to it one day soon. I advise anyone about to watch not to be eating anything during the documentary though.

7/10







SF = Z


[Snooze Factor Ratings]:
Z = didn't nod off at all
Zz = nearly nodded off but managed to stay alert
Zzz = nodded off and missed some of the film but went back to watch what I missed
Zzzz = nodded off and missed some of the film but went back to watch what I missed but nodded off again at the same point and therefore needed to go back a number of times before I got through it...
Zzzzz = nodded off and missed some or the rest of the film but was not interested enough to go back over it



Zoolander 2 (2016)


This is a small step below the first one, which was just as stupid. But its a funny parody, though it would probably be best within the constraints of an SNL skit instead of a full length movie.