Quentin Tarantino Officially Retiring

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Quentin Tarantino Confirms Retirement Rumors: 2 More Films and Out

The Hollywood Reporter3 hours ago (Getty Images) By Seth Abramovitch, The Hollywood Reporter


Quentin Tarantino has doubled-down on his pledge never to make another film past his tenth — meaning his next two films will be his last.


“Drop the mic. Boom. Tell everybody, ‘Match that s**t,'” he said Thursday to much applause at Adobe Max, a creativity conference held by the software giant inside the San Diego Convention Center.
But before Tarantino gets to work on his next full-length scripted film — which he teased earlier this year as potentially being a “Bonnie and Clyde-esque” tale set in 1930s Australian — the 53-year-old director told the crowd inside Hall H that he is focused at the moment on a historical nonfiction project.


For four years, Tarantino has been been immersed in studying the year 1970, one he considers the most pivotal in the history of cinema. How the project eventually takes shape is not yet entirely clear. “It could be a book, a documentary, a five-part podcast,” he says.


Ann Lewnes, CMO of Adobe, conducted Thursday’s interview. She asked Tarantino, dressed in a blue denim shirt over a black T-shirt and jeans, how he personally defines success.


“Hopefully, the way I define success when I finish my career is that I’m considered one of the greatest filmmakers that ever lived. And going further, a great artist, not just filmmaker,” he said. The audience laughed and applauded.


Tarantino also shared some of the secrets of his creative process: Each new script involves a tour through his personal record collection, stored in a room designed to evoke a vintage record store.
“So much of [the movie’s language] revolves around a sound or a song,” he said. “Before I’ve started, I’m seriously thinking about the music. I’m listening to a track and picturing everyone at the Cannes Palais just loving it.”


After back-to-back hits for his longtime studio home, The Weinstein Company — 2008’s Inglourious Basterds ($120 million domestic gross) and 2012’s Django Unchained ($163 million, a career high) — last year’s Hateful Eight stumbled domestically.
The nearly three-hour whodunnit, set almost entirely inside an Old West general store, disappointed at the box office, bringing in just $54 million in the U.S. It fared much better overseas, adding $101 million to its global take.
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Yeah, we'll see.
If his next 2 films do well, then I doubt he will actually call it quits.


And I sure hope one of his next 2 films is another gangster/crime film like Reservoir Dogs or Pulp Fiction. Maybe he can reteam with Travolta.



Old news. Don't think he'll stop if his films are still succesful. I've seen interviews where he said stuff like: "2 left... or maybe 3 or 4". I don't take his interviews about his possible career moves too seriously.
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He'll be what? Close to 60 by the time those are both done? Definitely not unusual for directors to slow down or quit entirely by then. Doubtful he'll be completely stagnant though. Especially in a day and age when he could get a creator credit for a TV show easy as pie or produce some more movies using his clout with the Weinstein brothers.
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Would love to see some new directors handle his writing.
Only stuff I know of that he wrote and didnt direct was Tony Scotts True Romance and Oliver Stones Natural Born Killers. I definitely would rather see QTs vision of NBK over Stones. He had to have been deep in the acid making that one. I think the only thing Scott changed was he put everything in chronological order, Oldmans scene was supposed to be a flashback, and Slater didnt die at the end.



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I sure hope that one of them will be Deadpool 2.

But seriously, this is fair. I understand him wanting to go out on top rather than ever end up spinning his wheels the same way that older directors are wont to do, but we'll definitely have to see if he does go through with that once he actually gets film #10 in the can.
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I sure hope that one of them will be Deadpool 2.

But seriously, this is fair. I understand him wanting to go out on top rather than ever end up spinning his wheels the same way that older directors are wont to do, but we'll definitely have to see if he does go through with that once he actually gets film #10 in the can.
I think itd be a waste if he stopped with only 10 films. 10 films?! Thats not impressive to me but underachieving. He could have been one of the greats, but plainly put, he did not want to push himself. Scorcese got better after 10 films, Speilberg certainly did cause by then he was out of The Goonies phase.
Bah, Id bitch about him if he retired or kept working, so whatever.



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I think itd be a waste if he stopped with only 10 films. 10 films?! Thats not impressive to me but underachieving. He could have been one of the greats, but plainly put, he did not want to push himself. Scorcese got better after 10 films, Speilberg certainly did cause by then he was out of The Goonies phase.
Bah, Id bitch about him if he retired or kept working, so whatever.
I can understand wanting to favour quality over quantity, though. If anything, setting himself a limit seems like it only encourage him to make sure that each new project he undertook would genuinely be worth it in the long run. It's worth noting that the next film he made after his original 10-film announcement was The Hateful Eight, which was most definitely a polarising but ultimately interesting piece of work. I offer Woody Allen as a counter-example - he's well into his eighties and has averaged a movie a year for at least forty years now, but as a result they tend to run together a bit (especially in recent years).



I can understand wanting to favour quality over quantity, though. If anything, setting himself a limit seems like it only encourage him to make sure that each new project he undertook would genuinely be worth it in the long run. It's worth noting that the next film he made after his original 10-film announcement was The Hateful Eight, which was most definitely a polarising but ultimately interesting piece of work. I offer Woody Allen as a counter-example - he's well into his eighties and has averaged a movie a year for at least forty years now, but as a result they tend to run together a bit (especially in recent years).
Yeah but it mostly is great stuff. I used to watch Woody Allen films all the time before, yknow, but his writing and storytelling in his directing got better with time long after his 10th film. I mean, its only 10 films, thats not a big number in a career. This isnt like writing novels.

Like Inglorious Basterds, I felt if QT had waited, and learned more about filmmaking, similar to how Spielberg waited till he felt he was able to direct Schindlers List properly, that movie would have won Best Picture deservedly. Instead he directs himself into a corner, then kills everything with a supposed "homage to drive-in movies" style violence, whatever

Hey, I enjoy his work, and its not like hes shown where he cant improve in areas. If he got his head out of his Hollywooded arse he would be even better than what he is, but his greatest works we'll probably never see now.



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Yeah but it mostly is great stuff. I used to watch Woody Allen films all the time before, yknow, but his writing and storytelling in his directing got better with time long after his 10th film. I mean, its only 10 films, thats not a big number in a career. This isnt like writing novels.

Like Inglorious Basterds, I felt if QT had waited, and learned more about filmmaking, similar to how Spielberg waited till he felt he was able to direct Schindlers List properly, that movie would have won Best Picture deservedly. Instead he directs himself into a corner, then kills everything with a supposed "homage to drive-in movies" style violence, whatever

Hey, I enjoy his work, and its not like hes shown where he cant improve in areas. If he got his head out of his Hollywooded arse he would be even better than what he is, but his greatest works we'll probably never see now.
I reckon that's an interesting idea for a thread where you hypothesise how different directors' filmographies would look if they had only made their first ten movies. John Carpenter would have a higher batting average if he'd stopped after Big Trouble in Little China. Ten may not be a particularly large number, but that just gets back to the question of quantity against quality. Novels are no different - you can spend years putting together an elaborate epic or knock out potboilers over and over. Consider the difference between the individual outputs of, say, David Foster Wallace and Clive Cussler.

That being said, your comments on Inglourious Basterds do make me question your understanding of Tarantino. It's interesting to see how he does show signs of maturing while still staying true to his characteristic pulpiness - the entire Shoshanna plot alone speaks to a willingness to defy the expectations set up by the actual Basterds plot and they do intertwine in a manner more interesting than your "drive-in violence" dismissal suggests. I'd rather he stayed true to his sensibilities while allowing for maturation instead of compromising himself in order to appease the Academy - his output certainly doesn't suggest that he's deliberately making Oscar bait for the sake of it. It is especially weird that you think that he's too "Hollywooded" while also arguing that he's not trying hard enough to be a more Oscar-friendly filmmaker.



Hes always said this though?
and yeah,i doubt it too,unless theres many years inbetween the 2.

Anyways,not really that bothered-not really a big fan of his work.
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That being said, your comments on Inglourious Basterds do make me question your understanding of Tarantino. It's interesting to see how he does show signs of maturing while still staying true to his characteristic pulpiness - the entire Shoshanna plot alone speaks to a willingness to defy the expectations set up by the actual Basterds plot and they do intertwine in a manner more interesting than your "drive-in violence" dismissal suggests. I'd rather he stayed true to his sensibilities while allowing for maturation instead of compromising himself in order to appease the Academy - his output certainly doesn't suggest that he's deliberately making Oscar bait for the sake of it. It is especially weird that you think that he's too "Hollywooded" while also arguing that he's not trying hard enough to be a more Oscar-friendly filmmaker.
Its weird cause you misunderstood, I meant he was "Hollywooded" out with his thinking, his overblown opinion of himself, like what I was describing in the rest of my post.

What you are describing is someone not "selling out" for academy expectations, and Im describing hes not going to evolve. If he is to ever get better as a filmmaker he has to acknowledge his weak areas, and improve on them. Thats not "selling out". The ending to Inglorious Basterds was a cop-out. Not that it was his aim to, but he could have won Best Picture deservedly for that film it was so good until the last 20 minutes where he wrote himself into a hole and couldnt figure out how to end it.

Him staying "true to his sensibilities" means narrating a 3 hour western, then his sensibilities are flawed. He is falling off rather than evolving because he doesnt filter himself, and thats more obvious each film he makes. Maybe its best he stops at 10 after all.



For me, Inglourious Basterds and The Hateful Eight are in his top three films, so I see no such decline in work and hope he continues making films as long as he can, obviously.
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