Rate The Last Movie You Saw

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SF = Z


[Snooze Factor Ratings]:
Z = didn't nod off at all
Zz = nearly nodded off but managed to stay alert
Zzz = nodded off and missed some of the film but went back to watch what I missed
Zzzz = nodded off and missed some of the film but went back to watch what I missed but nodded off again at the same point and therefore needed to go back a number of times before I got through it...
Zzzzz = nodded off and missed some or the rest of the film but was not interested enough to go back over it





McCabe & Mrs. Miller, 1971

I thought that the soundtrack choices were interesting. At times I wondered if they weren't too modern, but I also have to admit that thematically and tonally they really fit the film and its events.
I thought the Cohen tunes worked perfectly for it, personally, and really added a lot to the overall haunting vibe of the movie:






I thought the Cohen tunes worked perfectly for it, personally, and really added a lot to the overall haunting vibe of the movie
Yeah, they grew on me as the film went on. I can't remember specifics, but there was some phrase or word that was kind of joltingly anachronistic in one of the early songs. But like I wrote, the mood of them is a really good fit.



The Stairs (2021)


3/10


Just lol. It's funny how for me, all of the halloween movies i've seen are better than this, and i've seen all of them except for rob zombie's second one, the 2021 "killing", and the producer edition of the curse of michael myers. At least the stairs is funny and kind of entertaining, but i can't keep going.



make sure to watch other 2
And indeed I did...


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Ocean's Twelve - (2004)

Woah! Slow down! Slow down! First of all, kudos for getting Soderbergh and the entire ensemble back for a sequel. Every actor comes back - and I don't know how they managed that (money, I guess.) Then they just throw no-name actors like Catherine Zeta-Jones, Bruce Willis, Robbie Coltrane, Eddie Izzard, Albert Finney and Vincent Cassel into the mix. No biggie. This though, felt like three Ocean's movies squeezed into one, picking up the pace to a frantic level that some people might have trouble keeping up with. Several plot elements sometimes blast by in one short scene and the kitchen sink hits you. I think this could have been better if the focus was on just one big heist instead of oodles of heists and plot twists - but you can't help but be awed by the behemoth that is Ocean's Twelve, and it's fun watching Julia Roberts playing a character who's pretending to be Julia Roberts (the film's best scene by far.) It's not as good as the first, or the third - but if you take it as what it is it passes.

6/10


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Ocean's Thirteen - (2007)

I needn't have been worried as I was - second sequels are nearly always the pits, but this one gets back on the right track and produces something akin to the first film - which is so much more satisfying. The whole ensemble is back again (minus Julia Roberts) - and that must be some kind of record for most cast members returning for two sequels. This time Danny and his gang are out for revenge, as the tyrannical Willy Bank (Al Pacino), who has screwed Reuben Tishkoff (Elliott Gould) needs to be brought down a peg or two. Of course the revenge is gargantuan as the gang hit the opening of Bank's new Hotel and Casino in every single way you could possibly hit it. Pacino and Barkin make for all-too-believable-these-days villains - allowing for one of my favourite things in sequels - the former bad guy turning into one of the good guys (Carl Weathers in Rocky III is a good example.) It's over-the-top fun, as usual, but straightforward and focused. I think everyone took on board the criticism that Ocean's Twelve got and produced something that's fun for us as well as the filmmakers.

7/10
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10 to midnight (1983) 7/10
Eye for an eye (1981) 6/10 i expected more from this but it seems that code of silence is a much better film on all fronts




The Hit (1984, Stephen Frears)

Very good British hit-man road-trip thriller. Awesome acting from a great cast (John Hurt, Terence Stamp, Tim Roth), understated and subtly suspenseful atmosphere, a few memorable scenes (the hand biting scene in the car - wow). A film of raw charm and charisma.



Rear Window (1954)

I'll probably anger lots of folk in here by saying this wasn't anything special. It's an old-school romantic comedy with a half-baked murder story as a dressing. Some of the dialogue is funny, but everything feels so fake. It's a moderately easy watch, but I wouldn't recognize it as the masterpiece it's claimed to be.
You're not alone on this - not a huge fan either. Good film no doubt, but too light-hearted for me, and I just didn't get what the big deal was with the suspense - it just didn't work for me.
There are other Hitchcock films that I find way superior, like Vertigo , North by Northwest, etc.



Candyman (2021)

A 90-minute pamphlet saying all cops are bastards and all whites are evil. There were moments it barely resembled a horror film, but it always felt secondary to the political message. What a waste of time.
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Walking out (2017)

Survival drama where a father and son try to firstly bond (they only see each other once a year) then get off a mountain in Montana after an accident. All the while there are flashbacks as to how the father was with his grandfather and became an avid outdoorsman.
Interesting and well acted.....outstandingly shot.



I knew I'd really like Malignant. The action was a little out of place, but forgivable for me since I get bothered by too much tradition. Besides, every scene was exceptionally directed, and with constant perfect lighting effects.





You're not alone on this - not a huge fan either. Good film no doubt, but too light-hearted for me, and I just didn't get what the big deal was with the suspense - it just didn't work for me.
There are other Hitchcock films that I find way superior, like Vertigo , North by Northwest, etc.

It's funny that you both think this considering that I just put it in my top 100. However, Hitchcock's not very typical of a movie maker and tries to balance art with message a lot. I'd say the dislike of any one of his films, especially something as unique as Rear Window, is understandable if not always agreeable.







Curse of the Crimson Altar (The Crimson Cult) - 1968 British horror from Tigon films and very loosely based on the short story, "The Dreams in the Witch House" by HP Lovecraft. Tigon was trying to compete with Hammer and Amicus productions in the field of low budget horror and were also responsible for films like Witchfinder General and The Blood on Satan's Claw among others.

Christopher Lee and Boris Karloff are first billed but they're on screen only part of the time. The actual star is Mark Eden and he plays antiques dealer Robert Manning who, when the film opens, is searching for his missing brother Peter. He has received a letter from Peter that indicates he was visiting the isolated Craxted Lodge in their ancestral town of Greymarsh. When Manning journeys there he finds a bacchanal of sorts going on that he eventually discovers has to do with the anniversary of a witch burning that took place 300 years ago. Lavinia Morley was found guilty of witchcraft and burned at the stake at the prompting of Robert's ancestor. Before dying Lavinia cursed the people of the town and in particular the descendants of her accusers.

It's a talky but somewhat effective supernatural thriller and, while not in the same league as most of Hammer's offerings, still might keep your interest chiefly because of the two old warhorses Karloff and Lee. Painfully thin and plagued by arthritis Karloff was near the end of his career and life and this turned out to be his final movie released during his lifetime. And yet he still manages to imbue his Professor John Marsh with a quiet sort of dignity and his frailty doesn't show in his line readings. Lee was said to have hated this film but like Karloff his professionalism wins out and his role as Lavinia's ancestor is satisfying enough. Seminal horror actress Barbara Steele also manages well in her scenes as Lavinia and another horror mainstay, Michael Gough, acquits himself well in the small role of Lee's attendant Elder.

Maybe not a must-see horror film but if you're any kind of aficionado you'll for sure want to check this off your list.




Oh man! I LOVED this movie. Believe it or not, I saw it when it was released in '53 or '54 when I was 9-10 years old... Even at that age I related to Johnny (Brando) as a rebel. Set me on a lifetime of non-conformity.

It's also the first time I recall seeing Lee Marvin (as "Chino"), who also knocked me out. I followed him for the rest of his great career.

As you know the film was based on an incident in Hollister, Calf. on July 4th, 1947, when a motorcycle association rally took over the town for the weekend, and raised hell.





Split Second, 1992

Set in a future with cities flooded from climate change, detective Harley Stone (Rutger Hauer) is hot on the trail of a serial killer that murdered his partner. Linked psychically somehow to the killer, Stone is frustratingly just one step behind the brutal killings. Paired up with a new partner, (Alastair Duncan), Stone continues his hunt for the killer while dealing with the feelings he has for his partner's wife (Kim Cattrall), with whom he was having an affair.

I mean, like, what even was this movie?

It is hard to explain how I felt watching this film. It seemed like everyone making it was, I don't know, high and exhausted and in a rush? There's this weird, frantic pace to everything. Scenes seem to race to be scary and tell jokes and also pew pew pew all at once.

This is the kind of film that sort of ebbs and flows in its impression. On one hand, there is something almost unique about it because it's just so strange. A handful of memorable images, and some strange chemistry between the leads add a degree of unpredictability that makes the film oddly watchable.

But also, you know, meh. The film has that "inexplicably smokey" look of a lot of 90s films. The entire mystery behind the killer feels cobbled together and half-baked. Women in this universe exist only as sex objects or murder victims or both. The unlikely friendship between Stone and his more straight-laced partner is probably the strongest element of the film, but even that doesn't feel entirely right.

Watchable almost more for its flaws than for its strengths.




Oh man! I LOVED this movie. Believe it or not, I saw it when it was released in '53 or '54 when I was 9-10 years old... Even at that age I related to Johnny (Brando) as a rebel. Set me on a lifetime of non-conformity.

It's also the first time I recall seeing Lee Marvin (as "Chino"), who also knocked me out. I followed him for the rest of his great career.

As you know the film was based on an incident in Hollister, Calf. on July 4th, 1947, when a motorcycle association rally took over the town for the weekend, and raised hell.
Actually, I didn't know that, but this movie was great...I also agree with you that Lee Marvin was fantastic.





Heart of Glass, 1976

In a small town, the owner of a glass factory has died, unexpectedly taking the secret of the town's famed Ruby Glass with him. Unable to conceive of a future without their successful Ruby Glass formula, the owners of the glass factory and the town's residents fall into a sort of living stupor. A local shepherd (Josef Bierbichler) watches events unfold, making ominous-but-accurate predictions about the future.

After I watched this movie I immediately went to read Ebert's review of it (it is one of his Great Movies). Sometimes when I like a movie but can't quite articulate why, I just enjoy reading someone else saying smart, interesting things about it.

Ebert's thoughts on the film actually hew really close to mine: this is a film to be felt more than understood. The great strength of it is in the way that it evokes a very specific mood---some kind of strange intersection between the infinite and the mundane. There are several sequences in which music plays over beautiful scenes of nature. There are also scenes in which a woman dances to no music on a table in a bar. Together, the different scenes make you aware of the long stretch of time and of the small, mundane moments.

The characters in the movie (aside from the shepherd and one of the glass factory owners who is obsessed with finding the missing formula) are incredibly muted and their line delivery is intentionally very flat. Even the characters who stand out a bit speak as if in a haze---or, as I felt watching the film, like people who have already accepted that they are being swept out to sea even as they go through the motions of paddling against the current.

In a handful of conversations about Herzog, it's been asserted that his documentary work outstrips his narrative work. Until this film I would have agreed, but this might be in contention as a favorite film of his. It builds mood and meaning and a unique, dream-like reality.