Noirvember 2021

Tools    





You canít beat the atmosphere of a noir with an icy femme fatale. I watched The Lady from Shanghai a few days ago. I love when movies are narrated throughout by the protagonist.
https://www.movieforums.com/communit...18#post2251018
Love Lady from Shanghai. Welles' style is always dynamite even when his Irish accent isn't. Need more Hayworth femme fatale performances in my life.

Ya know, I hadn't thought about it, TCM used to take care of this for me until I got rid of cable.
I like the idea, though I'm a bit worn out on themed months after doing my sci-fi/thriller month and my Horrorthon month, but I do love me some noir and I haven't watched much of it recently - and I have some pretty gaping holes left in this genre - so maybe this is as good a time as any.

Are "Neo-noirs" welcome?

(I do have to see Bond, Dune, and The Eternals this month, though. I won't post about them here, don't worry.)
All noir is welcome! I'm planning to hit up some of my Suzuku Nikkatsu noir before the month is out. I'm also seeing Eternals today and won't be posting it in this thread unless the style shocks me.

I've already seen it and I think it's really good. Not sure how to feel about the final 5 or so minutes, but aside from that, I find it to be a well-acted, powerful satire on media manipulation anchored by Doulgas's character. I'm a huge fan of Billy Wilder in general.
Curious. I have no problem with any of it. Have you seen many Fritz Lang noir? The Big Heat would probably be my favorite of his noir, though he's got a few proto-noir like M that best it.

Might I humbly suggest Tightrope (1984)? A decent Neo Noir Starring Eastwood.

Ace in the Hole is another film Iíve been meaning to watch for, again, well over a decade, and I love Wilder. AndÖ.oh hey, whaddya know? Itís available to stream on prime!
Might as well add that to my list of noir for this month.
Dang. Tightrope is one of the very few Clint films I haven't seen. Guess I'll have to track it down.

Hope you love AITH. Pairs nicely with Nightcrawler if you want to do a classic/neo noir double feature.

Oh cool you're into Gloria Grahame! She's one of my all time favorites I made a point of watching all of her movies...and I did, with the exception of a couple obscure ones that I couldn't find (still looking for them).

She was in 13 noirs if my memory serves me and of course it depends on how one defines a noir. Most of them are pretty darn good and even the lesser ones are worth watching for Gloria's performance as she usually gave it her all. In my book Gloria Grahame is the quintessential noir female lead. I'm not sure I'd call her a femme fatale. Though I guess she did play that roll in a couple of her noirs, but mostly she goes beyond that and invibes an aching soul into her character.


Odds Against Tomorrow (1959)
Not as a Stranger (1955)
Naked Alibi (1954)
Human Desire (1954)
The Good Die Young (1954)
The Big Heat (1953)
The Glass Wall (1953)
Sudden Fear (1952)
Macao (1952)
In a Lonely Place (1950)
Roughshod (1949)
A Woman's Secret (1949)
Crossfire (1947)
Love Grahame. She's usually not particularly fatale. All femme. Love her presence so I'll have to check a few more of these out. Appreciate the list!



Curious. I have no problem with any of it. Have you seen many Fritz Lang noir? The Big Heat would probably be my favorite of his noir, though he's got a few proto-noir like M that best it.
I thought the ending to Ace in the Hole felt kinda contrived.
WARNING: spoilers below
I was surprised he didn't seek medical attention from the stab wound since he was bleeding out all day, even as he was having trouble remaining conscious. I get that the Hays Code required for his character to be punished, but couldn't they have come up with something less crazy and implausible? This is a minor issue though.


In regards to Fritz Lang, I haven't seen The Big Heat, but as for his noirs, I've seen M and The Testament of Dr. Mabuse (these count as noirs, right?). I'll have to watch some more of his films.



The trick is not minding
I thought the ending to Ace in the Hole felt kinda contrived.
WARNING: spoilers below
I was surprised he didn't seek medical attention from the stab wound since he was bleeding out all day, even as he was having trouble remaining conscious. I get that the Hays Code required for his character to be punished, but couldn't they have come up with something less crazy and implausible? This is a minor issue though.


In regards to Fritz Lang, I haven't seen The Big Heat, but as for his noirs, I've seen M and The Testament of Dr. Mabuse (these count as noirs, right?). I'll have to watch some more of his films.
If you have either Amazon prime and Tubi, they both have quite a few Lang features available, including some of his noirs.



If you have either Amazon prime and Tubi, they both have quite a few Lang features available, including some of his noirs.
I do have Tubi, so I'll have to check a couple of his films out this month.



The trick is not minding
I do have Tubi, so I'll have to check a couple of his films out this month.
They have Blue Gardenia, Woman in the Window and maybe Scarlet Street? In fact, Tubi has a very early Lang film from 1919 & 1920, The Spiders, which was originally released int two parts but have been combined into 1 film here.
Also, a few of his late German films, The Tiger of Eschnapur and The Indian Tomb.



They have Blue Gardenia, Woman in the Window and maybe Scarlet Street? In fact, Tubi has a very early Lang film from 1919 & 1920, The Spiders, which was originally released int two parts but have been combined into 1 film here.
Also, a few of his late German films, The Tiger of Eschnapur and The Indian Tomb.
I went to Tubi and looked at The Woman in the Window and it's a colorized version, ugh!

I haven't really watched anything at Tubi but I wonder if they have unrestored videos?



The trick is not minding
I went to Tubi and looked at The Woman in the Window and it's a colorized version, ugh!

I haven't really watched anything at Tubi but I wonder if they have unrestored videos?
Yeah, there are plenty unrestored. Didnít even realize it was colorized. Will have to check the Amazonís version and see if itís the same.



I thought the ending to Ace in the Hole felt kinda contrived.
WARNING: spoilers below
I was surprised he didn't seek medical attention from the stab wound since he was bleeding out all day, even as he was having trouble remaining conscious. I get that the Hays Code required for his character to be punished, but couldn't they have come up with something less crazy and implausible? This is a minor issue though.


In regards to Fritz Lang, I haven't seen The Big Heat, but as for his noirs, I've seen M and The Testament of Dr. Mabuse (these count as noirs, right?). I'll have to watch some more of his films.
I don't think of it as contrived as much as tragically ironic...
WARNING: spoilers below
given that his entire arc was defined by ignoring a clear danger for selfish means. Inverting that is poignant.


I wouldn't consider them film noir, as the term is classically defined a period of American cinema from the 40s-60s, usually beginning with Maltese Falcon and ending with Touch of Evil. However, Lang represents the messiness of this as his cynical works as a Jewish man in the Weimar Republic largely fortell the cynicism that would overtake American cinema, largely due to the influx of filmmakers like himself.

So, I'd still watch em this month as the tangentially related "proto-noir," which is a large umbrella of German Expressionism and gangster flicks



Regarding The Big Heat, that tied for 1st place in the last Noir HoF that we did. We should do another one, I'd be up to host it.

We've done three Noir HoFs so far. The nominations are listed on the second post of each thread. Take a gander, there's some good stuff that was nominated.

Film Noir HoF
Film Noir HoF Part 2
Film Noir HoF III



I don't think of it as contrived as much as tragically ironic...
WARNING: spoilers below
given that his entire arc was defined by ignoring a clear danger for selfish means. Inverting that is poignant.


I wouldn't consider them film noir, as the term is classically defined a period of American cinema from the 40s-60s, usually beginning with Maltese Falcon and ending with Touch of Evil. However, Lang represents the messiness of this as his cynical works as a Jewish man in the Weimar Republic largely fortell the cynicism that would overtake American cinema, largely due to the influx of filmmakers like himself.

So, I'd still watch em this month as the tangentially related "proto-noir," which is a large umbrella of German Expressionism and gangster flicks
That's a fair interpretation of the ending. I see your point.

Since this thread covers all kinds of noir, I'll probably get to a couple proto noirs as well. I'll see if I can go for a variety of noirs this month.



I thought the ending to Ace in the Hole felt kinda contrived.
WARNING: spoilers below
I was surprised he didn't seek medical attention from the stab wound since he was bleeding out all day, even as he was having trouble remaining conscious. I get that the Hays Code required for his character to be punished, but couldn't they have come up with something less crazy and implausible? This is a minor issue though.
I had more or less the same issues, but I think this is a moment where we have to suspend our disbelief a little in favor of where and how the director wants the story to end.
__________________
Check out my podcast: The Movie Loot!



What I gathered from Ace in the Hole is that the reporter was reckless and self destructive, so for me the ending worked. Oh and Jan Sterling! Geez what a performance, she really makes the film go as when we're not in the cave, her actions are pretty darn despicable and yet I can't help but like her!

Did you guys know that Ace in the Hole was based on a real story?



What I gathered from Ace in the Hole is that the reporter was reckless and self destructive, so for me the ending worked.
Exactly. So,

WARNING: spoilers below

...as implausible as it is to have him walk around all day with a stab wound on his stomach only to dramatically collapse at his boss office, the way it unfolds makes sense within the narrative and themes of the story.



"Walked around all day" doesn't quite capture what he's actually doing, as it implies some banal tasks at hand.

He's...

WARNING: spoilers below
trying desperately to undo all of the mistakes that he's made and save a man's life, a man who trusts him and he utterly betrayed in every way imaginable. He's not concerned with his life because he's trying to save his own soul. He fails completely because it's simply too late to fix it.

He doesn't act for selfish reasons and kills an innocent man. He doesn't act for selfless reasons and kills himself. It's the exact type of fitting, cynical moralizing that makes Wilder a master of the genre.



Okay, here's my schedule for this month. Tried to go for a bit of a variety.

November 7: A Face in the Crowd (1957)
November 9: The Big Heat (1953)
November 11: Blow Out (1981)
November 13: The Devil is a Woman (1935)
November 15: Eastern Promises (2007)
November 17: High Sierra (1941)
November 19: In Cold Blood (1967)
November 21: The Lady From Shanghai (1947)
November 23: Le Cercle Rouge (1970)
November 25: Ossessione (1943)
November 27: Port of Shadows (1938)
November 29: Sorry, Wrong Number (1948)



Okay, here's my schedule for this month. Tried to go for a bit of a variety.

November 7: A Face in the Crowd (1957)
November 9: The Big Heat (1953)
November 11: Blow Out (1981)
November 15: Eastern Promises (2007)
November 17: High Sierra (1941)
November 19: In Cold Blood (1967)
November 21: The Lady From Shanghai (1947)
November 23: Le Circle Rouge (1970)
I'm a huge fan of all of these. While I was watching Nightmare Alley, I couldn't help but feel like it would pair nicely with A Face in the Crowd. They lack the typical tropes of the genre but that cynicism and greed shine through.



I'm a huge fan of all of these. While I was watching Nightmare Alley, I couldn't help but feel like it would pair nicely with A Face in the Crowd. They lack the typical tropes of the genre but that cynicism and greed shine through.
A couple of these, like Blow Out, have been on my watchlist for a while. A few more of them are blind picks. Overall, I'm looking forward to them.



A couple of these, like Blow Out, have been on my watchlist for a while. A few more of them are blind picks. Overall, I'm looking forward to them.
Blow Out is probably my favorite DePalma. It's more political thriller than neo-noir but it wouldn't feel at all out of place among them due to aforementioned cynicism and nihilism. It's the time he best managed to put his Hitchcock pastiche into a formula that produced an exceptional narrative and cast worthy of his craft.



Also, here's some brief thoughts on a few film noirs I've seen recently:

Crossfire: Though my favorite aspect about the film (showing the same flashback from different perspectives) was underutilized, it more than made up for this with some stellar acting and a solid script. Probably my least favorite of this bunch, but it's still pretty good.

The Fallen Idol: An emotionally complex tale of misunderstandings and deception. It captures childlike joy and admiration while simultaneously showing what the people they idol are actually like. Definitely my favorite of these three noirs.

Gun Crazy: In spite of its low budget, it looks and feels about 20 years ahead of its time. The standout sequences for me were the car chases and the final scene.



Gun Crazy: In spite of its low budget, it looks and feels about 20 years ahead of its time. The standout sequences for me were the car chases and the final scene.
One of my personal favorites, a wild ride and one bad femme fatale!