Joker origin Movie

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My only gripe about the film,is that,film is set in gotham city however we don t see anything from batman as a background story even...not even newspaper stuff during the film....and i have to add the movie lacks that compelling atmosphere pace we had in the nolan films, the first hour barely any urgency except those killings on the train..i expected a much more compelling story



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A bucket of anxiety
My only gripe about the film,is that,film is set in gotham city however we don t see anything from batman as a background story even...not even newspaper stuff during the film....and i have to add the movie lacks that compelling atmosphere pace we had in the nolan films, the first hour barely any urgency except those killings on the train..i expected a much more compelling story
That was one of my issues with it as well but I was told that was my fault for expecting anything resembling a comic book movie in a movie about a comic book character. And I don't just mean from Miss Vicky, I've gotten that response from multiple people.
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Ami-Scythe



Another thing if anyonennoticed, but robert de niro works a lot as a comedian, he could do a comedy film



Have you ever seen Analyze This?
it s not like this..



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I don't blame him.
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Way too much stupid talk on the forum. Iroquois, Im thinking about you.



I found this wildly amusing. Haven't laughed this hard in a long time.

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One thing about the ending to the movie. I feel like it should have ended
WARNING: "SPOILER" spoilers below
With the riot in the street and the Wayne family killed, rather than the additional ending of the mental asylum scene, which I found to be unnecessary and not as big of a note to end on.


Does anyone else feel that way?



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WARNING: "Joker/Brazil" spoilers below
Eh, not really. It provides the necessary come-down that follows Arthur's most triumphant moment by bringing him back to reality, kind of like the ending of Brazil in that regard. It's basically a reminder that he's still just a troubled human being underneath the infamy and iconography of "Joker" and whether that means he deserves pity or contempt or anything else or everything all at once is left to the audience. That's without mentioning the question of how much of the film involves him being an unreliable narrator and whether or not anything in the third act even happened, but I don't think that's handled particularly well by the film as a whole.



Oh okay, it just felt like instead of going out with a bang, they decided to go out with a bang then credits, but then reload the gun after, before the credits if that makes sense.

It's like how the movie Seven originally wanted to go out with a bang and end one scene earlier, but then they decided to tack on that last scene at the end.



Another thing I was wondering, is why is that this movie has gotten so much controversy for being a villain origin story, with a murderous protagonist, that a lot of people were on fire about, but yet Breaking Bad has a origin of a murderous protagonist, yet that was a huge hit and people loved it?

Why is it that this movie in an exception to that in comparison?



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Breaking Bad got treated differently because it was an original TV show with all-new characters that immediately managed to establish a compelling moral grey area in its premise - terminally ill science teacher resorts to crime in order to ensure his family is set for life after his death - and then kept chipping away at audiences' sympathy for Walt as he did increasingly horrible things in order to protect his interests (which became more selfish as the series progressed). Of course, there was a sub-section of an audience that still considered him a justified, sympathetic anti-hero even as his actions became less justifiable (which also extended to actively hating a more objectively sympathetic character like Skyler simply because she stood up to Walt). That kind of mentality isn't exactly new either - we've seen it with the likes of Travis Bickle or Tyler Durden where amoral/villainous characters end up being venerated for being sufficiently relatable or aspirational or whatever. This was true of The Dark Knight's Joker - unambiguous villain of the film with no sympathetic backstory, but his being partially motivated to expose society's ills (organised crime, corrupt institutions, etc.) is very much in line with characters like Bickle or Durden and is considerably (if not completely) validated by the film even if he is ultimately defeated by Batman and proven wrong about his misanthropic view of people.

So we have an established history of these kinds of characters who tend to be villainous but are granted enough depth and definition to make them as understandable (if not relatable) as the heroes, which has the side-effect of certain viewers interpreting them as twisted anti-heroes instead of actual villains (especially if the film's narrative is a tragic backstory where we follow them from their highest point to their lowest so we start out sympathetic to them and that sympathy lingers even as they become more villainous). I think enough people had caught onto this issue by the time that Joker came out that they were expecting it to fall into the same trap and were actively preparing to denounce the film on those terms (which is understandable considering how villainous the previous versions of the character have been to the point where trying to do a sympathetic prequel about him already seemed like a bad idea). While this is obviously more to do with the film's audience than the film itself, I don't think Joker handles its story well enough to avoid the comparison - if anything, it seems to be actively inviting it.



Oh okay. You mean avoid comparison to Breaking Bad, or just more sympathetic villains in general?