Rate The Last Movie You Saw

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Hellloooo Cindy - Scary Movie (2000)
Hereditary

For some reason I had in my mind this was Robert Egger's follow up film after The Witch and maybe I heard the comparison somewhere because they are very similar in some ways Ö it's also very similar to another movie which I wont name but is kind of obvious from the beginning.. I don't think it hides it's influence but there's a few too many going on and whilst not bad, it fails to live up to the hype surrounding it or make anything very original, certainly in storytelling

What film? Sorry Iím quite obsessed with this movie right now. Is it R B?



The Big Trail (1930)




I watched this because it's on the top 100 westerns list. It's an early film for both director Raoul Walsh and star John Wayne. I read that at the time it was a huge flop and that it hurt Wayne's stardom for several years. It's corny and dated at times, and it was certainly before prime John Wayne. I really liked the epic adventure aspect of it, and the on location filming was really cool.



Crime and Punishment - 7/10

I watched Crime and Punishment last night, and I expected to be "wowed" by Peter Lorre's performance in it, but I wasn't. I wanted to understand what he was going through, and "feel" him being tormented by what he had done, and someone else being charged with his crime, but sadly, it just felt like an average crime movie.





THE GOOD THE BAD & THE UGLY:Speaking of westerns Cricket I watched this 'spaghetti western' on the weekend. I have never gone in much for these but I found myself enjoying this one. Eli Wallach stole the show. I loved the journey we were taken on as they traipsed across the desert in pursuit of revenge and a truck full of buried money.
★★★Ĺ Very Good / Interesting Concept and Execution / Evoking





My mother wanted to see it for a second time.

Me: So why do you think fans hate it?

Mom: What did they expect? They need to get over themselves.




Thursday Next's Avatar
I never could get the hang of Thursdays.
The Story of the Last Chrysanthemum (1939) Good.


Frances Ha (2012) At first I thought this was going to be really annoying but I was wrong. Also good.



ďI was cured, all right!Ē


As far as I love Van Damme, this film stinks!
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Trouble in Paradise (1932)




I watched this because it's on the Ebert list. I know it's highly regarded but I just sat there stonefaced. I do see how others could find it elegant, charming, and humorous. With the exception of Heaven Can Wait, this has been my normal experience with films from director Ernst Lubitsch. There were no noticeable flaws from my viewpoint, so I guess it just wasn't for me. In that case, I give it my standard gentleman's rating.



matt72582's Avatar
Please Quote/Tag Or I'll Miss Your Responses
I watched Crime and Punishment last night, and I expected to be "wowed" by Peter Lorre's performance in it, but I wasn't. I wanted to understand what he was going through, and "feel" him being tormented by what he had done, and someone else being charged with his crime, but sadly, it just felt like an average crime movie.
Lorre is in some of the best movies, but I don't think he's very good. I'm going to guess he had a leg up because he spoke a few languages.



Art of the Devil 2 (2005)

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Thai horror that's part supernatural, which I'm not a big fan of, but also part sick gorefest. It was made well enough and worth watching for fans of this type of thing. A worthwhile recommendation from MovieGal.



movies can be okay...
Duel by Steven Spielberg -


What Jaws did for sharks and Dreamcatcher did for toilets, Duel will definitely do for trucks.

Blade Runner by Ridley Scott -


All the way throughout this great film, Michael's speech from the movie Anomalisa, was ringing in my head. "What is it to be human? What is it to ache? What is it to be alive?". These questions are what Blade Runner is centred around. There's so much one can get into when discussing this movie, and that's what sci-fi as a genre should always offer, not just relying on a set design.

Side note, am I the only one who's immensely bothered, by Ridley Scott's attitude towards one of the big questions of the movie. He literally goes out of his way in his interviews, to enforce on the audience what his intentions were regarding that aspect, and that pisses me off. Not because I disagree with what he is saying, but because he thinks that by being the director, his word on whatever ambiguity is law, and if you disagree then you're a moron ("You would have to be an idiot not to get that Deckard is a replicant...If you don't get that, you have to be a moron!" his words, not mine). Personally, even if a director confronted me with their true intentions behind whatever they left ambiguous in their film, I still will stick with my own interpretation and believe it's just as right.

Blade Runner 2049 by Denis Villeneuve -


Surprisingly, I easily favour this sequel to the original. The latter is mostly due to the emotional impact Denis Villeneuve's continuation left on me, and also me preferring 2049's plot. The sequel avoids copying what came before it (which is what most sequels nowadays lazily bank on), and builds on what we've previously seen and experienced, and expands on the thematic aspects of the original. The story concepts this time are far more superior in my eyes, and manage to be even more interesting than what was already immensely interesting in the 1981 feature. For such a "long" film, I genuinely would've been down for at least another hour in this bleak world, which is a feeling I wished to experience after leaving Ridley Scott's version.
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"A film has to be a dialogue, not a monologue ó a dialogue to provoke in the viewer his own thoughts, his own feelings. And if a film is a dialogue, then itís a good film; if itís not a dialogue, itís a bad film."
- Michael "Gloomy Old Fart" Haneke





Deadpool (2016)



''Negasonic TeenageÖ what the ****? Thatís the coolest name ever!''