The mafo's MoFo 100 List

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If you liked the camera work you might want to check out a documentary that's currently playing OnDemand. It's called, Who Needs Sleep, and it's about the film industries workplace environment. It's shot and directed by the director of photography that did, Who's Afraid of Virginia Wolf? I don't think the camera work's amazing in the doc, but the DP is kind of interesting. He's a wise old man with some interesting tails.
There is also a documentary made by Haskell Wexler's son about his father. Tell Them Who You Are. http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0420952/
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To tell you the truth, I feel no need to post anymore about my movies, but I'll try.

8. The Lord of the Rings (Peter Jackson, 2001-2003)



This series is easy enough to combine up. Even if I appreciated it differently with each movie, I still find it to be one gargantuan movie, so for this list, I say, let's go for it! I would have put the movies in my list somewhere, so it's OK for me to post them together. I loved the intro of The Fellowship of the Ring. Ian McKellen probably gives his greatest performance, and the sets, locations, cast and F/X are set up for the entire trilogy.

The Two Towers introduces my favorite character, Gollum, and turns most of the film into a medieval battle, and then accentuates that battle up the yin-yang. I find a special love for The Return of the King because, besides bringing everything to a close, they finally found ways to show thngs using CGI which they could never show before.

I have to admit that one of the main things I love about the trilogy is that it showed things which no one has ever been able to show before. It has been over two years since I've watched these films, but they carry deep memories for me, almost every single day.




The People's Republic of Clogher
Don't let the bastards grind you down. You've still got 7 more posts to make here.

At least.
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"Critics are like eunuchs in a harem; they know how the Tatty 100 is done, they've seen it done every day, but they're unable to do it themselves." - Brendan Behan



I've just recently been watching the extended versions of all three films, and I have to say, despite of giving you and extra 40 minutes in Middle earth, they ultimately detract from the overall experience quite a bit. Maybe I'm just too attached to the original versions, but every single added scene felt absolutely redundant, to the point where I wondered why anybody in their right mind would have written them, let alone included them in the film...

As far as fantasy films are concerned, LOTR represent the pinnacle and I don't see anything surpassing it any time in the near future (despite its shortcomings, which weren't that few to be honest, the most notable being Liz Tyler and her character).



Put me in your pocket...
To tell you the truth, I feel no need to post anymore about my movies, but I'll try.
Don't let the bastards grind you down. You've still got 7 more posts to make here.

At least.
I agree with Tacitus. Please finish your list Mark. You've put alot of time and effort into making your wonderful list. It would be a shame if you stopped when you're so close to the finish line.

You've been a great read. Please finish.



Will your system be alright, when you dream of home tonight?
Come on keep em coming
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I used to be addicted to crystal meth, now I'm just addicted to Breaking Bad.
Originally Posted by Yoda
If I were buying a laser gun I'd definitely take the XF-3800 before I took the "Pew Pew Pew Fun Gun."



Yeah, even if we already know what's coming (hint: user profile... favorite movies...) I've enjoyed reading each of the entries in this thread so far so I want you to finish. Maybe take some time off, do a little dance, make a little love, then come back and boogie down with the rest of your top ten .

(I kind of wish there was a more menacing smile. Like with a cleft chin and a missing tooth or something. Oh well, guess you'll have to settle for ol' yellowy)



To tell you the truth, I feel no need to post anymore about my movies, but I'll try
I've really enjoyed reading your film list. It's not the simple naming of films that's interesting it's why you chose them and what is personal to you so even if we know what your top ten is, we still need to know why! So keep em coming



Bright light. Bright light. Uh oh.
7. Cabaret (Bob Fosse, 1972)

Liza Minnelli follows in her mom's (Judy Garland's) footsteps by giving one of the greatest female performances ever in my vote for the greatest movie musical. The film tackles family relationships, the rise of Naziism in early 1930s Germany, sexuality, self-delusion, transplanted people having a difficult time in their new environment, Bob Fosse choreography, whether a woman can stand up to pee, the joys/dangers of a ménage à trois, the comparison/contrast between Jews and Nazis, the idea that a musical can be a totally honest, believeble film, etc.

-
Except for one chilling scene, all the musical numbers take place in the cabaret, so this is a film which won't let you criticize it for somehow being unrealistic. All the songs in the cabaret, comment, often shatteringly, about what's going on in 1931 Germany and what kind of moral climate could possibly propulgate it. The song sung outside the cabaret is the show-stopping Nazi hymn, "Tomorrow Belongs to Me", sung at an outdoor hofbräuhaus where the citizens get a little... shall we say... carried away with their nationalism.

Director/choreographer Bob Fosse comes up with so many incredible images that your jaw should be in a constant state of dropitis, plus he elicits incredible performances by Liza, the masterfully-hateful-yet-cool M.C. (Joel Grey), the vulnerable English teacher (Michael York), the doomed, yet somehow hilarious couple (Marisa Berenson and Fritz Wepper), and the wealthy married man (Helmut Griem) who can afford to dally with multiple lovers. They all add to the power and entertainment of Cabaret, a truly mature, hilarious and moving movie musical. I will guarantee you that you will be surprised by it.



See, this is why you should continue. I did not know Judy was Liza's mother. I can't believe I didn't know that.
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Save the drama for your Mama
I am really, really enjoying your list. A great variety of time frames, subject matter and genres. Looking forward to the last few.

See, this is why you should continue. I did not know Judy was Liza's mother. I can't believe I didn't know that.

The fact that my own child did not know Judy Garland was Liza's mother leaves me speechless. Musical lover that I am, how did I so neglect your education????
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The fact that my own child did not know Judy Garland was Liza's mother leaves me speechless. Musical lover that I am, how did I so neglect your education????
It really is pretty pathetic isn't it?



Bright light. Bright light. Uh oh.
6. Raiders of the Lost Ark (Steven Spielberg, 1981)



Spielberg, George Lucas and scripter Philip Kaufman combine to create an homage to Saturday matinee serials which pumps up the creativity and the wit (both verbal and visual) to levels which would have never really been seen in the 1930s/40s. First, they create a perfect hero, team him up with some sidekicks, introduce a suave bad guy (Belloq, Paul Freeman), throw in a historical nemesis in the Nazis, and then to top it off, they throw in a sacred artifact of the Jews.

Raiders of the Lost Ark crams in so much action into one movie that the only one I can compare it to is its prequel, Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom (1984). I love that film as much as Raiders, except that I can accept that Raiders was first, but even so, the intro and finale of Temple of Doom actually have more action included in it than the former film. I understand that some people hate Kate Capshaw's character, but I find her to be a sarcastic match for Indy, and this second film seems more attuned to the horror comic films (aka graphic novels) which recently seem to be flooding the movie marketplace.



At the same time, I'd be remiss not to mention Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade (1989). I know many people who love it the most, and I certainly do love it too. The intro with a young Indy (River Phoenix) has special meaning to me because I saw the film just after vacationing in Utah (and Arches National Park specifically) where it was filmed. Plus, I find Sean Connery's performance as Indy's pop the crowning achievement of his acting career, and the father/son teaming easily the greatest character relationships in the series. Still, although it's a terrific movie, it comes in third for me in the Indy sweepstakes. (That means that I give it
.)



Not much more to say about these wonderful films. Yes, I'm a huge fan boy, and I would have made three separate entries in the Top 30, let alone the Top 100, but that would make my list even more predictable.



Aye boy don't spit in my drink!
YEEEAAHH!! I love that you gave props to every film in the trilogy (soon to be quadrilogy). They were my favorite movies to watch growing up. I used to even enjoy them more than Star Wars!

And is everyone else privy to the fact that Temple of Doom is a prequel to Raiders of the Lost Ark? I had no idea whatsoever. And how did you know mark?



Welcome to the human race...
YEEEAAHH!! I love that you gave props to every film in the trilogy (soon to be quadrilogy). They were my favorite movies to watch growing up. I used to even enjoy them more than Star Wars!
I agree 100%. Along with Blues Brothers, I loved watching the Indiana Jones movies. I even saw Raiders again the other day (for what must be the 50th time) and it's still great.

And is everyone else privy to the fact that Temple of Doom is a prequel to Raiders of the Lost Ark? I had no idea whatsoever. And how did you know mark?
Raiders takes place in 1936. Temple takes place in 1935. They're in the subtitles after the credits I think.
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