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Originally Posted by SamsoniteDelilah
Eric Bana (Troy) made his screen debut in this docu-dramedy (I just made that term up!) about life as a brutal, ruthless and somehow charming killer. Based on the personality, tales told and books written while incarcerated by Mark (Chopper) Read.
Thanks for a great review of Chopper you are right this is not for the kiddies or faint hearted.
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Health is the greatest gift, contentment the greatest wealth, faithfulness the best relationship.
Buddha



i'm SUPER GOOD at Jewel karaoke
thanks for the review on Garden State, Sammy! i really enjoyed that movie and your review was right-on, sez me.
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Originally Posted by SamsoniteDelilah
Wow... I saw this on the shelf earlier this week and passed assuming it was some stupid comedy. After browsing through your reviews I decided to give it a go and absolutely loved it! It had that weird feel present in Wes Anderson and Charlie Kaufman movies, something I just can't get enough of. I'm working on a review of it, but just had to thank you for the review... If I hadn't read yours I would have missed out on one of the most unique movies of the year!
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Toefuzz.com - Movie reviews and quotes for those of us fortunate enough to not have our heads shoved up overly critical rectums!

My Top 100 favorite movies.



Standing in the Sunlight, Laughing
Jean de Florette
When does self-interest become greed? Where does the pursuit of self-preservation
florette
become destructive? Writer/director Claude Berri and co-writer Gerard Brach raise these questions in Jean de Flourette, starring Yves Montand, Daniel Artuiel and Gerard Depardeu. The story centers around an elderly gentleman, concerned with continuing his family?s name by marrying off his nephew. The nephew just wants to grow carnations, but to do that, he needs water, and to get the water, these two conspire to cheat their neighbor.

This is a simple and beautiful little story, by turns charming and sad, told perfectly by cast and filmmakers. Set in the French countryside, the camera work puts us in the landscape with the characters. Understated acting pulls us into the humanity of these characters without bashing us over the head with the moral issues at hand. Third in the quality trifecta is the writing: very direct and simple storytelling gives this story the feel of a fable and universal relatability, without telegraphing what is going to happen next.

Manon of the Spring
This is the continuation of the story begun in Jean de Flourette. Five years or so have elapsed when the story picks back up.
imgmanon
While either of these films will work as a stand-alone film, their full impact is realised only if you see them together, or reasonably so.

Manon des Sources (Manon of the Spring) has more of the feel of a Greek tragedy/comedy than it's predecessor. It completes the first story in a very satisfying and oddly suprising manner. The emotions are more complex and yet the story seems simpler. The charm is the same, though.

The performances are once again top-notch and all the lovely technical aspects are carried through from the first film. If all this isn't enough to make you rush out and rent it, let me also mention that you get to see this girl dancing nude:



OOOHHHH!!!! I love these movies!!!! I'm so glad you got a chance to see them.

'tis true, they make up a tragic, yet lovely tale. The acting is wonderful, and the simplistic cinematography and music fit the overall feel of the story well...and c'mon! It's got Gérard Depardieu at the top of his game!
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"Today, war is too important to be left to politicians. They have neither the time, the training, nor the inclination for strategic thought. I can no longer sit back and allow Communist infiltration, Communist indoctrination, Communist subversion and the international Communist conspiracy to sap and impurify all of our precious bodily fluids."



Standing in the Sunlight, Laughing
Originally Posted by LordSlaytan
OOOHHHH!!!! I love these movies!!!! I'm so glad you got a chance to see them.

'tis true, they make up a tragic, yet lovely tale. The acting is wonderful, and the simplistic cinematography and music fit the overall feel of the story well...and c'mon! It's got Gérard Depardieu at the top of his game!
Yeah, he really is! He can be a bit overpowering in some of his later films, but in this one he's in a mix of strong actors and he has such a great character in Jean. He's really endearing.



Standing in the Sunlight, Laughing
Originally Posted by nebbit
Thanks Sammy for reviewing 2 of my favourite movies.
To be honest, I had little choice. I saw these at my friends' house when I visited them in England and one of them has prodded me to review them ever since I've been back. They are wonderful movies though, and very under-seen in the States. I'd have had a challenge to find them here, I'm afraid.



Originally Posted by SamsoniteDelilah
They are wonderful movies though, and very under-seen in the States. I'd have had a challenge to find them here, I'm afraid.
They are quite well known here, I first saw them at the movies.



Standing in the Sunlight, Laughing
Were you familiar with G. Depardieu when those films came out? I thought it had been among his first til I looked it up on IMDb. He was very well established in film in the mid-80's!



I had only seen him in one movie before "Too Beautiful for You" I loved them so much that I tried to see nearly everything he did, I wasn't impressed with a few Hollywood movies he did.



Standing in the Sunlight, Laughing
Originally Posted by nebbit
I had only seen him in one movie before "Too Beautiful for You" I loved them so much that I tried to see nearly everything he did, I wasn't impressed with a few Hollywood movies he did.
I don't think Hollywood knew what to do with him, which is a shame.



The People's Republic of Clogher
Originally Posted by SamsoniteDelilah
I'd have had a challenge to find them here, I'm afraid.
That's quite sad...

They're fantastic films which I've had in my collection for 15 years (and that's only slightly to do with Emannuelle Beart's nudie dancin'). For me JDF and MDS are as vital a depiction of a way of life as Coppola's first two Godfather movies.

Thanks, Cinders, for reminding me to watch them again.
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"Critics are like eunuchs in a harem; they know how the Tatty 100 is done, they've seen it done every day, but they're unable to do it themselves." - Brendan Behan



every once in a while cablevision will play these two...not at the same time...usually when they put them on tho, i'm either not at home or at some hour when i'm usually not awake...

thanks for the reviews tho...i will look for these or try tot watch them next time...



Standing in the Sunlight, Laughing
Originally Posted by Tacitus
That's quite sad...

They're fantastic films which I've had in my collection for 15 years (and that's only slightly to do with Emannuelle Beart's nudie dancin'). For me JDF and MDS are as vital a depiction of a way of life as Coppola's first two Godfather movies.

Thanks, Cinders, for reminding me to watch them again.
Now that you mention it, that's a really good comparison. Godfather 1 & 2 are similarly connected to each other, the way the story expands in both directions in the second film and as the scope broadens, the meaning deepens. And both filmmakers do a great job of making you feel like part of the mob that the film is about.



Standing in the Sunlight, Laughing
Sling Blade is a story that navigates us, by means of a truly original character, through a familiar mileau and familiar issues in such a way
il
that we see it all as if for the first time. Karl Childers is the perhaps mentally challenged, certainly emotionally abused anti-hero of a morality play where the central figure knows right from wrong, and choses his actions accordingly... but leaves us shocked, nonetheless.

The writing, by first time writer/director Billy Bob Thornton, is not preachy. The acting is absolutely devoted (Thornton injured himself from maintaining the posture of the central character), if uneven in the supporting cast. Somehow, Dwight Yokum's suckiness in the role of the villain serves only to make him all the more reprehensible. The pace is my only complaint: it's a bit slow in the middle. Once the central characters and themes are introduced, they all seem to camp out a bit before progressing. It's well worth staying tuned in, however, as this film has one of the most powerful endings in my recollection.

The music in this is sweet without being sappy. The costumes and settings convey the working class mileau without being cheesy. The whole project walks a fine line between the familiar and the strange. It's a very strong first time showing from Thornton, and still one of his finest hours.



I am having a nervous breakdance
I love Sling Blade. There's a lot of great things about it. For instance, J.T. Walsh makes an unforgettable appearance in it.
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The novelist does not long to see the lion eat grass. He realizes that one and the same God created the wolf and the lamb, then smiled, "seeing that his work was good".

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They had temporarily escaped the factories, the warehouses, the slaughterhouses, the car washes - they'd be back in captivity the next day but
now they were out - they were wild with freedom. They weren't thinking about the slavery of poverty. Or the slavery of welfare and food stamps. The rest of us would be all right until the poor learned how to make atom bombs in their basements.