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The Girl on the Mountain, 2022

Jack (Daniel O'Reilly) lives in the wilderness following the tragic death of his daughter, for which he blames himself. One day he crosses paths with a mute girl, Aria (Makenzie Sconce) who is on the run from her mother's psychopathic boyfriend, Big Al (DT Carney).

This is a very by-the-numbers thriller, in a familiar model of "emotionally distant adult cares for child". Nothing in this movie will surprise anyone who has seen this type of thriller before, but it's not a bad variation on the theme.

The main positive of the movie is the solid rapport between O'Reilly and Sconce. On one hand, their scenes together are almost too chipper at times, happily romping around the mountain, fishing and hiking. It strains a bit of belief that a child who had witnessed and experienced serious abuse would so quickly trust a strange man. But the scenery in the film is really lovely, and the joy that the characters take in the wilderness feels genuine.

The downsides to the film are what you'd expect with a low-budget effort. Some of the acting is a bit spotty. There were a few plot points---especially around the death of Jack's daughter---that are handled a bit sloppily. It's frustrating when mediocre writing pulls down sequences of a movie, and that happens a few times: convenient plot points, unbelievable character actions, etc.

Not great, not bad. A way to pass an easy 90 minutes.




10 Foreign Language movies to go

By https://www.imdb.com/title/tt7664504/, Fair use, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=57916243

Three Identical Strangers - (2018)

If you like a good documentary full of twists and turns, you might want to skip reading about this and just put it straight in your watchlist.

Imagine being an adopted young man, and suddenly finding out, by accident, that you have a twin - meeting that twin and becoming something of a minor celebrity. Imagine then, the two of you finding out that there's a third version of you out there - that you were in fact one of three triplets - and becoming something of a major celebrity on all the television talk shows and even scoring a cameo opposite Madonna in a feature film. This happened to three strangers in New York in the early 1980s - they opened a restaurant called "triplets", but mental health problems caused something of a rift in what appeared to be the perfect three-way relationship. Once all this is out in this Tim Wardle documentary, he drops a bomb on you...

WARNING: spoilers below
These three men had been part of a secret scientific study on twins and triplets - they'd been intentionally separated and adopted out to specific families who were told their adopted kids were going to be studied simply to find out how they adjust to adopted life. This was happening to twins and triplets in the U.S. - all of whom, parents included, knew nothing about the fact they were twins or were being studied in that sense. In fact, all the people involved were being closely watched - and the results of these tests, instead of being published as they were initially meant to be, were buried and classified until the year 2066.


What starts out as a feel-good doc turns into something rather creepy and often at times sad. I was absolutely astonished at some of the revelations. This is a great one to catch if you get the chance.

7.5/10
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My movie ratings often go up or down a point or two after more reflection, research and rewatches.




The Body Disappears (1941) - I watched this comedy mainly for Edward Everett Horton, who is always a pleasure to watch. This probably won't make my comedy list, but it's a fun movie about an invisible man.


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If I answer a game thread correctly, just skip my turn and continue with the game.
OPEN FLOOR.





Watched with my son and wife. Wife hated it, my son and I loved it, hahahahaha
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SF = Z


[Snooze Factor Ratings]:
Z = didn't nod off at all
Zz = nearly nodded off but managed to stay alert
Zzz = nodded off and missed some of the film but went back to watch what I missed
Zzzz = nodded off and missed some of the film but went back to watch what I missed but nodded off again at the same point and therefore needed to go back a number of times before I got through it...
Zzzzz = nodded off and missed some or the rest of the film but was not interested enough to go back over it





Strangely, I had seen this before, but not the entire thing. Very odd.

Good movie. Jessie Buckley excellent. Very strange movie.

Jessie needs a skilled hairdresser stat. Her hair is beyond strange.
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Did anyone review this movie? Canít find any comments on it. Probably buried in this thread someplace.

Good movie, but I wouldnít want to see it again. Itís a lot.

Huge fan of Leonardo & he never disappoints. Lawrence also excellent. Jonah Hill & Cate Blanchett both very funny.



The world doesn't owe you a damn thing




Room at the Top (1959)
+++ A well-crafted romantic tragedy, filmed beautifully from England featuring the always exquisite Simone Signoret.

Joe Lampton (Laurence Harvey) is a callous, ambitious accountant blindly driven to take what he deserves. A place at the very top. His contempt for the rich, or rather their disregard for him, fuels his intent by attaining it by seducing the daughter of his firm's boss, played by Heather Sears.
The glitch? He finds himself falling in love with an older married woman (Simone Signoret) to yet another rich snob that insults his lowly status from high above.

A very slippery slope pitting the obsession to be an equal of the upper class and thereby have it all via upmanship and finding real love by a [email protected] good person.
One that Room at the Top takes quite the harsh tumble over the precipe before it's all done.
A raw, visceral battle of the darker emotions on the field of social classes that I found relentless and thoroughly engaging.
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The Batman

Well, I guess I just don't get it. I've never been the biggest fan of comic book films but I did always find The Dark Knight , TDK Rises & The Joker fairly compelling special films. But this one just missed the mark for me. I think the greatest benifit to marvel films is that they don't take themselves too seriously, I get it that's not the vibe DC was going for here, but in this case makes it extremely difficult for me to connect.

When I heard that Pattison would be the new batman I was actually excited. He was great in The Lighthouse. In no way was his range shown in this one. I get it, batman is supposed to be a sulky loner detective. But was there a single compelling moment in this three hours drag? Seriously at what moment as Wayne or Batman was he in the least bit captivating?

Production value as expected was great, the action sequences were intense enough for how bland the actual story line is. I did prefer the latter half when it was more of a detective chase, but even through it somehow just falls flat and too comic-booky, did anyone really get invested about the Riddler hints?

Maybe I'm just being a party pooper

-
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Yeah, there's no body mutilation in it







Room at the Top (1959)
+++ A well-crafted romantic tragedy, filmed beautifully from England featuring the always exquisite Simone Signoret.

Joe Lampton (Laurence Harvey) is a callous, ambitious accountant blindly driven to take what he deserves. A place at the very top. His contempt for the rich, or rather their disregard for him, fuels his intent by attaining it by seducing the daughter of his firm's boss, played by Heather Sears.
The glitch? He finds himself falling in love with an older married woman (Simone Signoret) to yet another rich snob that insults his lowly status from high above.

A very slippery slope pitting the obsession to be an equal of the upper class and thereby have it all via upmanship and finding real love by a [email protected] good person.
One that Room at the Top takes quite the harsh tumble over the precipe before it's all done.
A raw, visceral battle of the darker emotions on the field of social classes that I found relentless and thoroughly engaging.
Excellent movie & I recently bought the dvd for my collection.

Have you seen Harvey in Darling with Julie Christie? I think you would like it.

The Batman

Well, I guess I just don't get it. I've never been the biggest fan of comic book films but I did always find The Dark Knight , TDK Rises & The Joker fairly compelling special films. But this one just missed the mark for me. I think the greatest benifit to marvel films is that they don't take themselves too seriously, I get it that's not the vibe DC was going for here, but in this case makes it extremely difficult for me to connect.

When I heard that Pattison would be the new batman I was actually excited. He was great in The Lighthouse. In no way was his range shown in this one. I get it, batman is supposed to be a sulky loner detective. But was there a single compelling moment in this three hours drag? Seriously at what moment as Wayne or Batman was he in the least bit captivating?

Production value as expected was great, the action sequences were intense enough for how bland the actual story line is. I did prefer the latter half when it was more of a detective chase, but even through it somehow just falls flat and too comic-booky, did anyone really get invested about the Riddler hints?

Maybe I'm just being a party pooper

-
More or less what the New Yorker magazine said in its review last week.




Did anyone review this movie? Canít find any comments on it. Probably buried in this thread someplace.
Yeah, I've seen people rate anywhere from 2 to maybe 5 here. Mine was a 3.5 I believe, with the same thoughts as you.




After Yang - I haven't had a chance to watch Columbus, director Kogonada's first feature film. But the trailer and stars, John Cho and Haley Lu Richardson, immediately drew me in. This also has an engaging plot and it's cast includes Colin Farrell, Jodie Turner-Smith and Malea Emma Tjandrawidjaja with Richardson appearing again, this time in a smaller supporting role. It's set in a non-specified future where artificial beings can be purchased as caretakers. Yang (Justin H. Min) is just such a being and he's part of a family unit where Jake (Farrell) and Kira (Turner-Smith) have adopted Mika (Tjandrawidjaja). Yang was to function as a connection or touchstone to Mika's Chinese roots but he comes to play an all encompassing role as a mentor and surrogate father. Jake has drawn away from his family and it takes a malfunction on Yang's part for him to realize this.

This quiet and contemplative film tries it's hand at tackling several weighty subjects but there's no way a 96 minute movie can adequately address something as far-reaching as what it means to be human. It does however provide plenty of intimate and evocative moments. A primer of sorts. Or quite literally a scrapbook that Jake accesses when the schismatic technician that he calls on in his attempt to fix Yang inadvertently finds what he mistakes for spyware. It turns out to be Yang's memory bank and Jake is compelled to delve deeper and deeper into the mystery of someone he was largely indifferent to. And I think that with this realization he also comes to understand the depth of his apathy.

Great visuals in this. A lot of care taken in setting up shots and in setting a mood. The small cast is note perfect and Farrell again shows why he should be considered in the upper echelon of actors. The kid actor is adorable. Kogonada doesn't tie the ending up in a pretty bow. But it does close on a restorative note and the viewer is left gratified.

85/100



Room at the Top (1959)
Life at the Top (1965), also starring Harvey, is a solid sequel worth checking out also. It has a slightly cheaper and trashier feel which in some ways seems appropriate.



10 Foreign Language movies to go

By Poster scan, Fair use, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=16769338

Harakiri - (1962)

Great storytelling, really special film. This had me glued to the screen for it's entire runtime, and waiting with baited breath for what was about to happen in the present-day scenes where a rōnin has pledged to commit seppuku in the courtyard of a palace, but delays by telling the story of what brought him there - talking to the very culprits responsible for the gruesome death of his son-in-law which is replayed in agonizing fashion towards the start of the film. Looks great, there's no overbearing score and Tatsuya Nakadai plays his part particularly well. Engrossing and exciting, with a tension that just builds and builds and builds to it's final denouement. Loved it.

9.5/10

Foreign Language Countdown films seen : 79/100