Citizen Rules...Cinemaesque Chat-n-Review

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haven't heard of Macabre but I do love The Gunfighter. Karl Malden's bartender kept reminding me of the same sort of role he played, as a priest, in The Waterfront.
It's one of my favorite Peck movies, next to 12 O'Clock High
Twelve O'Clock High, awesome film. I've talked about it before, and seen it 3 times, but I guess I never reviewed it, as I just checked and couldn't find a review by me on it.

If I had to pick my favorite Gregory Peck movie it would be The Bravados (1958)

Peck is one of my favorite 1950s actors.




Bombers B-52 (1957)

Director: Gordon Douglas
Writers: Irving Wallace (screenplay), Sam Rolfe (story)
Cast: Karl Malden, Efrem Zimbalist Jr, Natalie Wood, Marsha Hunt
Genre: Melodrama

Another film about the
Strategic Air Command (SAC) set during the height of the Cold War, in 1957. Karl Malden is a no nonsense Master Sargent in the U.S. Air Force, stationed at Castle Air Force Base, California.

All is going well until his new Commanding Officer arrives one day, played by
Efrem Zimbalist Jr. It seems the Sargent blames the Lt. Colonel for the death of his men in the Korean war some years earlier. He considers his C.O. to be a hotshot who doesn't care about the men beneath him.

When his C.O. starts dating his daughter (Natalie Wood) he's furious! and decides to resign from the military. This is where the films message comes into play, that the
Strategic Air Command and its cold war mission of maintaining a nuclear deterrent against the Soviet Union is all important, more important than family or personal interest.



Unlike other aviation cold war movies Bombers B-52 has little time with the planes and is more like a 1950s melodrama with family and job problems.
Though we do see for the first time in any movie the then, state of the art, Boeing B-52 Stratofortress bomber.

I much preferred the more realistic
Strategic Air Command (1955). This one is more of a Hollywood entertainment type film. It's decent and I enjoyed it, but it's main claim to fame (besides the B-52) would be a young Natalie Wood.



Karl Malden is good here at being a stubborn non commissioned officer who won't budge from his position and won't listen to his wife and daughter, even though they now what's right and he doesn't.



I was disappointed in the small amount of time that we actually spend with the star of the film, the B-52. But we do get to see it in flight and even see it being refueled mid-air by an older KC-97...And as a plus there's a couple of choice 1957 Ford cars in the movie, a T-Bird and a convertible.

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Yes, movies can definitely be the realm of the senses, transporting us to different eras and cultures, letting us experience a virtual reality and recognize life such as was, is, and could be.





Wendy and Lucy (2008)
Director: Kelly Reichardt
Writers: Kelly Reichardt & Jonathan Raymond (screenplay)
Cast: Michelle Williams, Lucy, David Koppell
Genre: Indie Drama

A young woman drives across country to start a new life in Alaska. She finds herself stuck in a small town in Oregon with no money when her old car breaks down. Her family won't help her and her only friend is her dog Lucy.

Director Kelly Reichardt is quickly becoming one of my favorite indie directors. Hell, she's one of my favorite directors working today, period. She's probably best known for Meek's Cutoff (2010) and Certain Women (2016).

I've seen a number of films directed by Kelly Reichardt and I'm always impressed by how much reflective emotions she manages to show us with her long takes and quiet style of film making. Wendy and Lucy is like that, all the way. It's so expressive and yet understated.



Filmed in the small town of Wilsonville, Oregon the film has a realistic look to it as the filming is done on the streets and fields of the town. This really adds to the feel that Wendy is a real person and could be someone you would know. That it turn makes her character all the more sympathetic.



Michelle Williams really impressed me here with her facial expressions that speaks volumes, she actually doesn't say much in the movie. It's all in her reaction to the world around her and for her love of her dog, Lucy. This is a melancholy film at times and I felt more emotions during this film than I would a half dozen other movies. I thought it was pretty special.

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Gotta see more Reichardt, I really loved Meek's Cutoff. How did you see this Citizen?
Yup, I thought Meek's Cutoff was pretty great. I've seen it twice and was thinking I should watch it again. I probably well. When I first watched it, I didn't know who the director was, I watched as it was a western.

I seen Wendy and Lucy on a DVD from my library. I also have Night Moves coming real soon.




Miller's Crossing (1990)
Directors: Joel Coen, Ethan Coen
Writers: Joel Coen, Ethan Coen
Cast: Gabriel Byrne, Albert Finney, John Turturro
Genre: Period Piece, Crime Thriller

"Tom Regan, an advisor to a Prohibition-era crime boss, tries to keep the peace between warring mobs but gets caught in divided loyalties."

I liked it, it kept me on my toes as to what was going to happen...This was NOT like later Coen Bros films. It didn't have any of the Coen's trademark wackiness, yet it still had their film making mastery and style about it.

Miller's Crossing
is a straight up, serious, gangster drama with a whole bunch of twists that kept me guessing who was double crossing who, and how they were doing it? It was cleverly written and the plot was hard to follow at times, which is a good thing...as it means the film is intelligent, either that or I just wasn't paying attention.



I was impressed by how well grounded the actors were in their characters. No over the top caricaturizations here. I believe this is how prohibition mobsters actually behaved and interacted with each other back in the day. It was all more low key and yet the stakes were high.



Gabriel Byrne especially was low key which was good to see as it made the movie all the more potent. And just for fun there are some good old Tommy Gun machine gun shoot outs, with bullets flying. But basically this is a thinking persons gangster movie. I liked it as such.


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Women will be your undoing, Pépé
been ages since I saw Miller's Crossing, but yeah, it's a little bit of a (very good) surprise to see that this is a Coen film.
Glad to hear you enjoyed, Citizen



been ages since I saw Miller's Crossing, but yeah, it's a little bit of a (very good) surprise to see that this is a Coen film.
Glad to hear you enjoyed, Citizen
I'm trying to catch up on the Coen films I haven't seen.




The Ladykillers (1955)

Director: Alexander Mackendrick
Writers: William Rose (story), William Rose (screenplay)
Cast: Alec Guinness, Peter Sellers, Cecil Parker, Katie Johnson, Danny Green
Genre: Crime Caper Comedy



"Five diverse oddball criminal types planning a bank robbery rent rooms on a cul-de-sac from an octogenarian widow under the pretext that they are classical musicians."

This was an easy watch and a fun way to pass a rainy night. I can't say it was anything special, but it was quaint, like a cup of warmed over tea, not exactly fresh or inspired but still soothing enough.



Left to right: Katie Johnson, Danny Green and Peter Sellers on violin.

By far the best part for me was the Old Lady, and yes she was called just that in the movie. She was also called Mrs. Wilberforce, which is kind of a funny name for a charmingly festive and well mannered character. The Old Lady was played by Katie Johnson and she's a gem.

I didn't really warm up to the other actors the five robbers, aka Lady Killers. I thought Alec Guinness would be a stand out but he wasn't really. The fake overbite teeth didn't help me to warm up to his character either. I thought Peter Sellers too would be a laugh riot, but he didn't really get many lines, I guess this was early on in his career.

The best character was the big goofy guy named One-Round (Danny Green). He was funny, but the best part was when all the other little old ladies came to tea which put a monkey wrench into the would-be robbers plans.



Nothing real original here, and this is a PG type movie and despite it's name, no ladies were killed...Just a nice jaunt for an easy watch.


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Completely agreed on The Ladykillers. It's not amazing but it's such a nice, goofy film. And yeah the old woman is fantastic. The Coen Bros remake is awful, their worst film IMO. Like Miller's Crossing about the same amount as you too.



Completely agreed on The Ladykillers. It's not amazing but it's such a nice, goofy film. And yeah the old woman is fantastic. The Coen Bros remake is awful, their worst film IMO. Like Miller's Crossing about the same amount as you too.
I liked the way they dumped the bodies into the train, ha that was a good running gag.

BTW, on your recommendation I have Night Moves, to watch. I figure I might as well get a head start at the Women Directors Countdown. At least I hope we do that one.

Catch ya later, I'm off for pizza and a movie



BTW, on your recommendation I have Night Moves, to watch. I figure I might as well get a head start at the Women Directors Countdown. At least I hope we do that one.
Hope you like it. It's very slow and dark and the characters are easy to hate so i'd get it if you don't. I just adore the atmosphere though like all of the films of hers i've seen. Night Moves is still my favourite.



I won't dance. Don't ask me...
Completely agreed on The Ladykillers. It's not amazing but it's such a nice, goofy film. And yeah the old woman is fantastic. The Coen Bros remake is awful, their worst film IMO.
I enjoyed Coen's remake also. Both movies was entertaining.



I won't dance. Don't ask me...
I like the Coen's version a lot. It always gets hate. Seems typical. It's a good movie, you're not wrong for enjoying it!
The first movie I saw was a Coen version. Tom Hanks was super. And this encoureged me to watch old movie.



The first movie I saw was a Coen version. Tom Hanks was super. And this encoureged me to watch old movie.
I love Hanks' laugh in that movie. Sounds like the nervous kid in class that always raises his hand the highest...