The MoFo Top 100 Animated Films - The Countdown

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I like the Toy Story movies, but I didn't vote for any of them, figuring they didn't need my help (and they didn't). If I had included them, the third entry would have been higher than the other two on my list. But all three are terrific. Monsters, Inc. was definitely on my list! To date it remains my favorite PIXAR film, just ahead of The Incredibles. Side-splittingly funny and endlessly clever, YES, but of course with that PIXAR heart, as well. Scaring/laughing up a top ten finish works for me.

Since we know what the collective top four are and are only waiting on the order, here are the four remaining titles from my list that did not make the top hundred...

HOLDEN'S FULL LIST

1. Waltz with Bashir (#26)
2. Fantastic Mr. Fox (#17)
3. "One Froggy Evening" (1955)
4. The Wrong Trousers (#35)
5. A Town Called Panic (#76)
6. The Lego Movie (#32)
7. The Illusionist (#60)
8. Alice in Wonderland (#33)
9. Persepolis (#28)
10 Akira (#29)
11. Idiots and Angels (2008)
12. Coraline (#36)
13. Animal Farm (#89)
14. Monsters, Inc. (#7)
15. Yellow Submarine (#62)
16. The Incredibles (#11)
17. Harvie Krumpet (2003)
18. The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh (1977)

19. Watership Down (#75)
20. Waking Life (#41)
21. South Park: Bigger, Longer, and Uncut (#25)
22. How to Train Your Dragon (#19)
23. Sleeping Beauty (#54)
24. "How the Grinch Stole Christmas" (#42)
25. Hugo the Hippo (DNP)




The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh
1977, John Lounsbery and Wolfgang Reitherman
As should be clear by now, I rather despise the compilation The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Movie because it takes some of the greatest Looney Tunes shorts of all time and edits them, needlessly. Here, the Disney people blend the three existing Pooh shorts in their entirety, plus connecting material done in the same style, and ending with the emotional final chapter from The House at Pooh Corner. After Walt Disney acquired the Milne books, he initially wanted to bring them to life as a feature. He ultimately decided that shorts would be a better way to introduce audiences, especially American audiences, to the characters and A.A. Milne’s style. The animation echoes the illustrations from the books, those wonderfully cast voices that became instantly and indelibly linked to those characters, especially Sterling Halloway as Pooh, Paul Winchell as Tigger, and John Fiedler's Piglet, great music and songs, and the spirit of Milne make them timeless. The original shorts were Winnie the Pooh and the Honey Tree (1966), Winnie the Pooh and the Blustery Day (1968), and Winnie the Pooh and Tigger Too! (1974). All of them classics, and all blended perfectly and added to for the 1977 feature.

How this one didn't make enough of your lists really puzzles and saddens me? Oh, bother, Mutherfu*kers.




"One Froggy Evening"
1955, Chuck Jones
Speaking of those bastardized votes for The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Movie, only one individual WB short made the top hundred, and that was the anarchical and fourth-wall destroying ”Duck Amuck”, by the ever immortal Chuck Jones. Chuck had his TV special ”How the Grinch Stole Christmas” make the list as well, and of course he had many of the pieces in Bugs Bunny/Road Runner. But he could have - and damn well should have - had at least half a dozen of his shorts make the cut. The one I voted for, the one that I think it ridiculously clever and hysterical and weird and perfect, is ”One Froggy Evening” (1955). Debuting theatrically on New Year’s Eve of 1956, it has the wit of an O. Henry story, with the deadpan subtlety and comic timing of the masters, delivers a winning combination of hubris and pathos, that delightful frustration, and all perfectly realized by Chuck Jones, who of course was working here without established and beloved characters or even dialogue, save the singing, but instead created a one-off confection that is surely happily burned into the memories and souls of all who see it.

The United States Library of Congress preserved it in the National Film Registry, deeming it "culturally significant". Steven Spielberg called it “the Citizen Kane of animated films”. The 1994 survey done for the book The 50 Greatest Cartoons: As Selected by 1,000 Animation Professionals had "One Froggy Evening" as number five, all time, behind three other Chuck Jones WB entries and one early Disney.

And did MoFo vote for it? But NoOooOOooOooo.




Idiots & Angels
2008, Bill Plymton
I honestly didn’t expect anybody else to vote for this one, just because it is relatively obscure and relatively weird. But I think it is Bill Plympton’s best, most complete work. Plympton is best known, if he is known at all, for his shorts. He has two Oscar nominations in that category, including for his influential ”Your Face” (1987), which got him a ton of work in advertising and for outlets such as MTV. But he has made features, and Idiots & Angels is a magnum opus, incorporating all of the best ideas and styles from his work, to that point, and presenting it in one bizarre yet personal meditation on the evil that men do. I’d be happily surprised if it got even two other votes, but I couldn’t keep it off of my list just because it was very unlikely to appear.




Harvie Krumpet
2003, Adam Elliot
Unlike the Plympton, I was slightly surprised not to see Harvie Krumpet make the list somewhere. I do like Mary & Max very much, and I kind of figured that would place higher than Harvie, if only because it is similar in many respects, yet is feature length. But I didn’t think little Harvie would get bumped COMPLETELY! Surprised perhaps because I saw it first (and instantly fell in love with it), and maybe because it actually won an Oscar and should have been a little more prominent on the radar of those unfamiliar with it before this poll? But I really expected this one to show. Oh, well. I hope its exclusion was mostly just a lack of space on lists thing and not a lack of appreciation. And that’s a fakt.



So I had twenty of my twenty-five show. Not bad, and I’ll take it. But I hope some of you check out Bill Plympton’s work, or re-familiarize yourselves with it. And I hope that in the future, wherever it may come up, that not so many of you vote for expurgated versions of classic Warner Brothers shorts rather than the full, perfect originals. Lastly, I really hope a lot of you feel like genuine A-holes for not including The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh on your lists. Because you are. A-holes.

That is all.


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__________________
"Film is a disease. When it infects your bloodstream it takes over as the number one hormone. It bosses the enzymes, directs the pineal gland, plays Iago to your psyche. As with heroin, the antidote to Film is more Film." - Frank Capra



"Money won is twice as sweet as money earned."



Bright light. Bright light. Uh oh.
I had The Lion King at #20. It's solid entertainment for everyone. We're not talking about The Power Puff Girls here. We're talking about Hamlet, whether you've got singing animals sometimes. I watched it last week and found it wonderful.
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Lord High Filmquisitor
The Lion King was probably my favorite movie growing up and is my girlfriend's favorite movie still. It's my second favorite adaptation of Hamlet (loose though it may be) and just barely missed out of my current top 100 movies list. As it currently stands, it's my second favorite film of the Disney Reneissance and my eighth favorite animated film overall.
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A loving heart is the truest wisdom.

Rewatched it before sending my list in and didn't care for it. Parts of it are really well done like the wildebeest stampede and Mufasa's death, but overall its a bit of a mess. I didn't care for the songs, most of the characters were dull, and the balance of comedy and drama is even worse here than in Disney's Hunchback (though I am rather fond of Hunchback despite it flaws.) I loved it as a kid but it doesn't hold up at all.
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I never could get the hang of Thursdays.
I confess The Lion King's appeal has always mystified me.

I was sad that Harvie Krumpet didn't make the list, too. It was my #18. I guess not enough of us had it high enough.




Idiots & Angels
2008, Bill Plymton
I honestly didn’t expect anybody else to vote for this one, just because it is relatively obscure and relatively weird. But I think it is Bill Plympton’s best, most complete work. Plympton is best known, if he is known at all, for his shorts. He has two Oscar nominations in that category, including for his influential ”Your Face” (1987), which got him a ton of work in advertising and for outlets such as MTV. But he has made features, and Idiots & Angels is a magnum opus, incorporating all of the best ideas and styles from his work, to that point, and presenting it in one bizarre yet personal meditation on the evil that men do. I’d be happily surprised if it got even two other votes, but I couldn’t keep it off of my list just because it was very unlikely to appear.

Yeah, too bad that film is so obscure. It's absolutely brilliant. It was my number 10. Breathtakingly animated, very engaging and truly memorable. Plympton is a genius.
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Cobpyth's Movie Log ~ 2019





4. WALL·E - Voting Stats

Total Points: 658
Part of a Numeric Tie? No.
38 Votes: Three 1st Place (25 pts. each), Three 2nd Place (24 pts. each), Three 3rd Place (23 pts. each), Two 4th Place (22 pts. each), Four 5th Place (21 pts. each), Two 6th Place (20 pts. each), Three 8th Place (18 pts. each), 9th Place (17 pts.), 10th Place (16 pts.), Four 11th Place (15 pts. each), Three 12th Place (14 pts. each), Three 14th Place (12 pts. each), Two 15th Place (11 pts. each), Two 16th Place (10 pts. each), 20th Place (6 pts.), 25th Place (1 pt.)



WALL·E was my number eleven, its a fantastic film for many reasons, and artistically I think it's one of Disney's best, love the attention to detail and Sci-Fi setting. Has a great sense of humour and one of the most unusual but touching love stories of any animation.



I've never been nearly as high on Wall-E as most others, so I'm glad to see it here rather than in one of the top three spots.

I have a weird reaction to movies like this: on one hand, it's impressive that they manage to create sympathy and pathos for a robot without much in the way of dialogue. On the other hand, it's a self-inflicted restraint that makes deeper feelings impossible (and one could make the argument that in some ways it's easier, because it allows people to read more of what they like into the character). Really good movie, but not a great one, to my mind. Especially when you start layering in film's message, which just isn't up to par with the usual elegance and subtlety you expect from the studio (the live action Fred Willard stuff, in particular, is pretty hammy).
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When I first saw the ads for WALL·E, my immediate reaction was "that thing's a Johnny 5 rip-off, wtf?" I also wasn't so sure about the premise but I had faith in the ability of Pixar to make magic out of anything (and back then that faith was well founded).

They didn't let me down. While Ratatouille impressed with its vivid colors, WALL·E was just as impressive in making a stark, desolate landscape seem just as beautiful. It infuses a unique and incredibly touching romance with a great deal of humor and makes robots seem far more alive than the humans that also inhabit their world.

I had WALL·E at #5.



My List
2. Ratatouille (#8)
3. Mary and Max. (#23)
4. Wreck-It Ralph (#27)
5. WALL·E (#4)
6. Surf's Up (#99)
7. The Nightmare Before Christmas (#14)
8. Over the Hedge (Near Miss)
9. Chicken Run (#51)
10. Charlotte's Web (#57)
11. Despicable Me (#61)
12. Waltz With Bashir (#26)
16. The Emporer's New Groove (#80)
21. How the Grinch Stole Christmas (#42)
22. Lilo & Stitch (#83)
23. How to Train Your Dragon (#19)
24. Bambi (#50)



Lord High Filmquisitor
WALL-E is a fantastic film, but suffers from a first half that is monstrously superior to its second half. There's very little that I find exceptional when they reach space and the intimacy of the primary narrative is lost.



I didn't vote for Wall-E but I thought it was pretty good.

I had The Lion King at #15. I'm a sucker for animals in distress movies.

That'll be it for me.

My list-

1. Ratatouille*
3. Rango
4. How to Train Your Dragon
5. Persepolis
6. Grave of the Fireflies
7. Animal Farm
8. Wreck-It Ralph
9. Fantastic Mr. Fox
10. Waltz with Bashir
11. The Plague Dogs
12. The Incredibles
13. Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs
14. Mary and Max
15. The Lion King
16. The Wind Rises
17. Pinocchio
18. Charlotte's Web
19. Kung Fu Panda
20. A Town Called Panic
21. Fantastic Planet
24. The Adventures of Prince Achmed (Near miss)
25. How the Grinch Stole Christmas