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crumbsroom 11-26-20 05:51 PM

Watching Movies Alone with crumbsroom
 
Former Corrie/RT members know what this means. Sporadic posting. Some pretty good reviews. Lots of bad ones. Tangents. Deplorable dive bars. Insect infestations. Crime. Punishment. Russian Literature.

All the fun stuff.

And maybe some Louis Del Grande trivia if your lucky (you won't be, nobody in this world is that lucky)

https://i.postimg.cc/V5ytTdL1/louis.jpg

Q: ?
A: ?

ThatDarnMKS 11-26-20 05:57 PM

What are you watching today and why is it BLOOD RAGE?

crumbsroom 11-26-20 05:58 PM

The Leningrad Cowboys would probably prefer you didn’t laugh at them, but they’re okay if you do. They don’t see anything particularly funny about their rock and roll tubas, or their Rumpelstiltskin shoes or their duck bill hairstyles that point accusingly at each other as they play. If they didn’t seem so indifferent to the reactions they get while up on stage, you’d almost think these over coiffed heads were blaming each other for the miserable or confused or indifferent state of their audiences. A Rock and Roll Mexican Standoff where no pompadour dares fire first. But laugh if you must. These are the Leningrad Cowboys after all, hardened against the world by years of practicing in the howling Siberian wind. If you laugh at one, you laugh at them all. And they will just keep playing, regardless.

Because of this resolute nature, when we do eventually laugh at the sight of them—the odd shape they make with their instruments in hand and their hairstyles in the way—it is only to love their inability to ever fit in anywhere. They make no apologies for their strangeness. They barely even make facial expressions. Together they stand, in matching suits, matching sunglasses, matching dead pan gazes and a matching passion to Balalaika the night away. They are a unified block or who cares, just do it. In many ways they become the perfect stand in for a true Rock and Roll spirit, which has only become much too serious over the years. The Leningrad Cowboys let us once again use laughter to affirm the vitality of our life juices. A lethal combination when paired with the Mashed Potato.

In this way, Leningrad Cowboys Go America is one of the great rock and roll movies, even though what they play is in not traditional rock and roll. Roving from State to State, looking for radio acceptance, they seem to absorb all of the country’s rich musical heritage as if picking up transmissions through their antennae hair-dos. Like the bastard child of rock and roll itself, the Cowboys are a boiled over melting pot of influences, their foreignness finding home in the swaddling of all manner of regional sounds; from country to swing; Tex-Mex to rockabilly.

As a result their roadtrip across America will play as an anthropological study of American music, an examination of its sponge like ability to appropriate anything that comes near it, and a criticism of the ruthless business practices that corrupt its best intentions. But it is mostly a celebration of taking something blind stupid in its passion with hopeless sincerity. Being so sincere we can’t help but laugh at it. A beautiful thing.

And so it will be as the Leningrad Cowboys stare stone faced down at us from the stage, squeezing their squeezeboxes and grumbling with their fluzelhorns, their ludicrous haircuts will point out at us as if beckoning us to join them. And why shouldn’t we? We’re already laughing, after all.



crumbsroom 11-26-20 05:59 PM

Originally Posted by ThatDarnMKS (Post 2144558)
What are you watching today and why is it BLOOD RAGE?
You raise a good point

ThatDarnMKS 11-26-20 06:00 PM

Originally Posted by crumbsroom (Post 2144561)
You raise a good point
It’s the only way to test the veracity of the claim that a substance is or is not, in fact, sauce made from cranberry.

Captain Terror 11-26-20 06:02 PM

Glad to see this thread revived, because I have some things to say about Strongman.

crumbsroom 11-26-20 06:04 PM

Originally Posted by Captain Terror (Post 2144563)
Glad to see this thread revived, because I have some things to say about Strongman.
Oooooo, do tell.

kgaard 11-26-20 06:27 PM

I am here for this.

Captain Terror 11-26-20 10:02 PM

Your review of Strongman pretty much says it all. (You should post it here if you haven't already. I read it on Letterboxd). So I'll start by saying I agree with everything you said there. So some random thoughts:

*I've never watched a couple break up in real time while sharing a block of cheese. That tells me these crazy kids are gonna make it after all.
*The "nail through the block of wood and two license plates" trick seemed like an ill-advised choice for a child's party. One wrong move could result in a bloody mess and several scarred psyches.
But on a more serious note-- I'd like to see a followup/prequel that profiles the girlfriend. She comes across as an intelligent person and her old modeling photos show a stunning beauty, so how did she end up in Jersey playing half-hearted hype man to Stanless Steel? I found her as fascinating as Pleskun.
But mostly I'd like to know how Stan feels about the finished film. When he watches it does he recognize the despair and futility that is so clear to us, or is he just stoked that a bigger audience can see him bending pennies? I wouldn't be at all surprised if it's the latter. His argument with the agent regarding the braids doesn't suggest an overabundance of self-awareness.
But yeah, great doc. Thanks for bringing it to my attention

ps--The more I think about the nickname the less sense it makes. ARGH!

crumbsroom 11-27-20 12:15 PM

Originally Posted by Captain Terror (Post 2144599)
Your review of Strongman pretty much says it all. (You should post it here if you haven't already. I read it on Letterboxd). So I'll start by saying I agree with everything you said there. So some random thoughts:

*I've never watched a couple break up in real time while sharing a block of cheese. That tells me these crazy kids are gonna make it after all.
*The "nail through the block of wood and two license plates" trick seemed like an ill-advised choice for a child's party. One wrong move could result in a bloody mess and several scarred psyches.
But on a more serious note-- I'd like to see a followup/prequel that profiles the girlfriend. She comes across as an intelligent person and her old modeling photos show a stunning beauty, so how did she end up in Jersey playing half-hearted hype man to Stanless Steel? I found her as fascinating as Pleskun.
But mostly I'd like to know how Stan feels about the finished film. When he watches it does he recognize the despair and futility that is so clear to us, or is he just stoked that a bigger audience can see him bending pennies? I wouldn't be at all surprised if it's the latter. His argument with the agent regarding the braids doesn't suggest an overabundance of self-awareness.
But yeah, great doc. Thanks for bringing it to my attention

ps--The more I think about the nickname the less sense it makes. ARGH!
For a movie that has seemingly disappeared between the cracks, its a really really good documentary. Strange, funny, frightening, sad. What more could you ask for from reality.

I watched it years go and that review was from RT wayback. I've just slowly been stockpiling writing I somehow salvaged from there (and Corrie) on letterboxd so it's all in one convenient place.

And the nickname is a headache inducer. It's a so clever it's stupid kind of thing, but not actually even clever. Just lots stupid.

crumbsroom 11-27-20 12:21 PM



If you ever come across Stanley Pleskun wandering about a parking lot or through the aisles of a Walmart, his hair in pigtails, his undersized t shirt rising high around his belly, he’s probably hoping that you suspect that he’s one of the strongest men in the world. Or, if not, that maybe you’ll at least ask. For those who do neither, then it seems it will be up to his girlfriend to set you straight as she acts as the carnival barker who will introduce him and his act. Speaking in her hesitant and not-quite-sure-if-what-she’s-saying-is-true manner, she will begin to say the words she has probably recited hundreds of times, yet never once gotten entirely right—“Ladies and gentlemen, we bring you the strongest man in the world at bending steel and metal, Staanless Steeeeel!!!”—which will bring about a smattering of applause from the audience that has come outside from their afternoon of discount shopping to congregate amongst the parked cars. They are here to see what one can do with such strength, and Pleskun will oblige by lifting trucks with his legs, or women with a single finger, or, in his signature trick, even bend pennies with a few grunts of his bare hands.

But even though he is a mountain of a man, built both high and wide with equal amounts raw muscle and beer induced flab, this will not be a documentary of a man whose enormous strength has kept him from being broken by the awfulness of life. This is the story of a man who is simply aware enough to know that the only thing he has in this life is this strength, and in trying to ensure that it doesn’t go to waste, he will use every ounce of it to wrestle iron pins, and horseshoes and whatever loose change he comes across in his pocket. Watching him struggle as he slowly bends whatever trinket his assistant has handed to him, hunching over, groaning, teeth grinding together, it becomes clear that Pleskun has no choice but to fight with these inanimate pieces of metal, since there is nothing else for him to test his superhuman strength upon, at least not without having the cops called. So as his face turns so red that we begin to fear that blood might start spitting out from his ears, and as his body begins to tremble as if what he’s twisting in his hands might possibly be electrified, watching Stanless Steel at work begins to become even an endurance test for us. And this discomfort will only increase as we realize that those who have come out to watch these public displays of his suffering are usually no more than a handful of loiterers lingering about empty parking lots, or children at birthday parties who are paying more attention to the slices of cake that they have in their laps. It seems that even when performing, Stanley Pleskun is completely alone.

From the very beginning of Zachary Levy’s documentary “Strongman”, we will be witness to the slightly leery manner in which the world views such a peculiar and out of step specimen as Stanless Steel Pleskun. It will be right there for us to see during the opening scene where we will be introduced to him while he is on the phone, attempting to rent a truck for one of his stunts. As he begins to engage the man on the other line in polite small talk, explaining what he needs such a heavy vehicle for, even divulging the meaning behind his awkward and somewhat stupid moniker, he will suddenly be hung up on, as if the details of his life sound more like a prank call than anything to be considered seriously. This will be a moment that captures the essence of this man, and it will be as good an introduction as any to what will be the many small defeats that he will suffer in the first stretch of the film, each of which he will accept with one of his sighing chuckles, as if he hopes to appear that he too is in on the joke.

But this will only be one of many distractions that Pleskun will use to keep up the airs the he is a very tough man indeed. And as much as he will sometimes drunkenly boast that he is so unnaturally strong that he is completely impervious to the harm of others, there is so much about his demeanor that will make us increasingly doubt this fact as the movie goes along. During close ups we will see that in his eyes he carries the wounded look of someone who has never fit in anywhere, and has probably never been able to figure out why. When we get a shot of someone reacting to something that he has said, it seems that they only nod along, instead of ever really showing any understanding of what it is he’s getting at. Even in the long roving scenes of Pleskun wandering about, just through the simple manner in which he moves, we will be given some notion of how poor a fit he really is in this world. Nearly aping the gait of a child who has suddenly realized it’s in a place it has never been before, yet nevertheless is always moving forward in hopes of not appearing lost, one cannot look at this man without wishing that at some point he will stop and admit to someone that he has chosen a wrong path somewhere. There is a desperate hope that, sooner rather than later, he will reach out for someone’s hand that can lead him in a better direction.

But as we come to realize that this is not likely to ever happen, something apparently in the DNA of this strongman precludes him asking for help, this will be where the movie will be able to build its currency of tension, despair and frustration in its audience. This film wants us to ache at the disconnect this man has between how he appears on the outside, and who he really is, and it can’t help but succeed when it continually refuses to look away from how wide and black the chasm between these two things really is.

The whole set up of “Strongman” is essentially to create a friction between these two contrasts in Stanley’s personality. Not only will we slowly begin to note the disparity between the strength of his exterior and the fragility of his interior, but most uncomfortable of all will be the vast gulf we will see between how Pleskun believes he is viewed, as opposed to how he is really seen. Pleskun seems completely unaware that everyone in his life, from his talent agents, to his girlfriend, to his peers in the world of strongmen, to even the audience of this movie, are constantly being given a nearly pornographic view of his gaping vulnerability. No matter how many things he can destroy in his enormous hands will ever distract us from this. This is why, as we are forced to bear witness to yet another feat of his misplaced strength, it begins to feel increasingly uncomfortable for us with every show he puts on. While he stands up on stage, struggling with whatever hunk of metal that he is slowly trying to warp somewhere inside of that violent bear hug he appears to be giving to himself, there is a feeling of complete impotence as he groans and staggers and goes cross eyed with his effort. As he sweats himself into a stupor, we can’t help but feel that nothing at all is being done to tend to the the unrelenting middle aged miseries of his life, and that they are now free to press in ever closer and completely drown him as he diverts all of his attention towards the fruitless twisting of a penny. We get the feeling that even if someone were to throw him a life preserver, instead of putting it on, his immediate instinct would be to show how quickly he could tear it in half.

As for what these terrors in his life are, while they are initially kept off screen for us to only wonder about, it will be during one remarkable scene half way through the film where we will finally see what it is that haunts this man as we watch the demon’s in Pleskun’s life suddenly materialize like a nightmare before our very eyes. What begins as a simple scene where Stanley hopes to show his girlfriend some old photographs he has come across at his childhood home, suddenly will darken as the reality of the world he both inhabits, and has clearly been infected by, slowly begins to creep into every corner of the frame. The metamorphosis of this scene will begin with the jarring, off screen sound of a blender, grinding what sounds like nuts and bolts, drowning out his voice and the memories he’s trying to share. Before Stanley can even protest to this noise though, an old shirtless man with saggy **** suddenly appears, attempting to flex his muscles. Then we will cut sharply to the image of an old woman in a bunk bed across the room, rigid with dementia, mouth agape and making snapping sounds. Then, as if stumbling in from an outtake of Deliverance, a drunken toothless beast of a man wobbles about the centre of the room, maybe dancing, maybe about to fall over, shouting what sounds like the words “Veronica Lake”. It is late at night, the moon is presumably out, and we have now been properly introduced to Pleskun’s family—mother blending, father flexing, grandmother snapping and brother bumbling. It’s a moment of sensory overload for not only the viewer, but also Pleskun as he seems overwhelmed with the noise and grotesque absurdity of his existence, and storms from the room in a flurry of cursing and barely restrained violence. It is a reality that he can do nothing to alter. He can’t twist it into a better shape, and it wouldn’t be proper to threaten it with fists. All he can do is run to another room and pretend that it isn’t there.

But like many men who have been backed into a corner, at some point a fight must take place, and this will be where Pleskun’s need to be a strongman comes into play. Unable to rise above the drudgery of his day job, the dysfunction of his family, and the increasingly hard to overlook signs that he may have problems with alcohol and other drugs, his fight with metal has become the only viable sign that he is still trying to hold his ground. This film is about this battle which takes place every time Stanless Steel is handed yet another seemingly unbendable obstacle, and how the success he believes that he achieves every time a hunk of metal relents, is completely secondary, since there can be no victories in a life like this. What he offers us as he gets on stage, and chalks his hands, and takes a deep breath before bending his bones and busting his blood vessels, is the spectacle of an internal struggle becoming manifest. There will never be enough horsehoes to twist, or coins to bend for him to ever claim victory. His fight is eternal. It is a struggle simply for the sake of a struggle. When reduced to his absolute essence, Pleskun is nothing but a man who has simply got more than his share of albatross’ slung about his neck, and the unfortunate strength to keep on carrying them wherever he may go. And it is the fact that he doesn’t simply collapse from this daily burden of his that is his most astonishing feat of all—even more so than the one he does with the penny.

SpelingError 11-27-20 12:35 PM

Re: Watching Movies Alone with crumbsroom
 
That review makes me want to watch that film. Excellent breakdown of it.

matt72582 11-27-20 01:25 PM

Re: Watching Movies Alone with crumbsroom
 
Kaurismaki and Pellonpaa is one of my favorite combinations. The sequel was disappointing, though... I love "Shadows in Paradise" the most.

crumbsroom 11-27-20 01:27 PM

Originally Posted by matt72582 (Post 2144690)
Kaurismaki and Pellonpaa is one of my favorite combinations. The sequel was disappointing, though... I love "Shadows in Paradise" the most.
Was Pellonpaa the manager? If so, he's great

matt72582 11-27-20 01:33 PM

Originally Posted by crumbsroom (Post 2144692)
Was Pellonpaa the manager? If so, he's great

Yup. He's one of my favorite actors. If you haven't already, also check out "Ariel", "Take Care of Your Scarf, Tatiana", "La Vie Boheme" (all with Aki), and even "Arvomatt" with Mika Kaurismaki

Jinnistan 11-27-20 05:54 PM

I was told there would be drugs and Russians.

crumbsroom 11-27-20 06:37 PM

Originally Posted by Jinnistan (Post 2144840)
I was told there would be drugs and Russians.
All that's left is the insect infestation. Interested? First come first serve

Jinnistan 11-27-20 06:48 PM

Originally Posted by crumbsroom (Post 2144867)
All that's left is the insect infestation. Interested? First come first serve
I'm thinking firefly-motif?

Rockatansky 11-27-20 09:37 PM

Originally Posted by crumbsroom (Post 2144867)
All that's left is the insect infestation. Interested? First come first serve
Excuse me while I put my coat in the refrigerator.*

crumbsroom 11-28-20 10:02 AM

Originally Posted by Rockatansky (Post 2144922)
Excuse me while I put my coat in the refrigerator.*

Oh, who doesn't love a Things reference.

You win three cockroaches!

crumbsroom 11-28-20 10:04 AM

Never mind the short-shorts. Or the crop tops. Everybody Wants Some is all about the present. Like anything distracted by its own youthful vigor, its characters are preoccupied with only one thing: Right Now! Today! Even if this moment is the 1980’s and what they are embracing was so long ago now.

But even if those up on screen have little interest in the past, and would already be bored by whatever future we are looking back at them from, some poor souls in the audience might not be so unfettered from dwelling over such things. With regrets and worries dislodging them from a present of their own, they come to this nostalgia trip with a need to once again fit inside a moment. Find themselves an eternal legwarmer they can curl up inside of and dream they never went out of fashion.

Maybe Everybody Wants Some is that legwarmer, or maybe it isn’t. Depending on what time one grew up in, it might not be a one size fit all comfort. What is universal about the film though is its tactile understanding of transitional moments in life. More than anything else, this movie is a memory of those times in our lives that are so brief they never really had a chance to feel lived in, only remembered. Everybody Wants Some allows us to crawl back inside the first few days of being a college freshman on campus, with an understanding of what a wonderfully disorienting feeling it is when everything is new, and we don’t know anybody. A place that will only last as long as we can stay lost in it. By the time we have begun to remember names and no longer need to ask directions to help get around, it will cease to exist. We can only stay here until we decide who it is we are going to be. Then it is shut off from us forever, becoming a place we only think back on when we wonder who we could have been instead.

But at least now we have Everybody Wants Some to provide us a window back here. A gracious leg warmer with an unobstructed view to way back. 80’s accessorizing has never seemed so functional.

All too often though coming of age films such as this seem written as if from the perspective of someone looking back. Those who know where life is heading and exactly where its pitfalls and tribulations lie. While this ‘wisdom’ allows for us to know what outcomes and choices we need to root for, it also can’t help but corrupt the experience of re-living the past as if it were still the present. What a blessing it will then be when Everybody Wants Some offers us Jake Bradford as our chaperone through these first days of campus life. Hardly speaking a word about the future, and showing no concern over what path he should even be taking, Jake is possessed with the sort of confidence that allows him to focus only on the moment he is inside of. And his undistracted view of this is somewhat of a revelation.

In devising a fish out of water story where the fish not only has legs, but already knows how to strut, Jake is allowed to shrug off any need for a narrative arc or have any sort of deep character revelation. Unmoored by these typical hangups of who he should befriend or what life path he should choose we are permitted to instead focus on all of the small details that now fill his life. The unimportant moments that make up these revelatory days. The sort of things that will one day become lost beneath the wave of bigger and better stories that are inevitably on their way. And to do so we will only need follow Jake’s directionless swagger from drink to drink, nightclub to nightclub, girl to girl and conversation to conversation. It’s likely that some of these people and events we are introduced to might still matter to him many years later. Others might not even be remembered the next morning. But Linklater’s decision to never differentiate between any of them gives the film it’s indelible sense of Now. At least (paradoxically) to those who are watching from our adulthoods.

And so it will be for us in the audiences that this film, so purposefully youthful and lighthearted on its surface, has a sense of being haunted. We can sense the ghosts of all of the paths that will not be taken. Our own lives are, after all, filled with bit players who for a short time could have been friends, but weren’t. And places we enjoyed being, but it turns out, would never visit again. LIkewise, this film throbs with this endless sense of possibility, and for us that know better, there is a beautiful sadness wondering who and what will be left behind, remain undiscovered, neglected or forgotten.

Rarely has a film understood this sort of transience with such a sense of dispassionate longing. It treats youth as it is, always moving forward, some dreams and friendships and promises being kept, while others fall off and jingle jangle away before anyone hardly notices. It is a time when ambassadors of both our past and future comingle, and the only way we will ever know who is who is to wait, until we grow older and can look back at everything that has been lost to us. And everything that is still here.



Wooley 11-28-20 12:31 PM

Originally Posted by crumbsroom (Post 2144959)
Ya know, I really wanted to see this when I saw the first trailer for it but something held me back. Whatever that something was, it has held me back for four years. Every time I think I might watch it, I don't. There was just something that didn't feel right about it or something.
You and I haven't always agreed on movies, lord knows, but I do know you to be a serious critic (meaning you use knowledge, and understanding, and insight in your critiques of film instead of just championing some film you "like" or pissing on ones you don't) so I take your words seriously and find myself moved to finally try to see this film.

crumbsroom 11-28-20 12:46 PM

Originally Posted by Wooley (Post 2144972)
Ya know, I really wanted to see this when I saw the first trailer for it but something held me back. Whatever that something was, it has held me back for four years. Every time I think I might watch it, I don't. There was just something that didn't feel right about it or something.
You and I haven't always agreed on movies, lord knows, but I do know you to be a serious critic (meaning you use knowledge, and understanding, and insight in your critiques of film instead of just championing some film you "like" or pissing on ones you don't) so I take your words seriously and find myself moved to finally try to see this film.

Even though it is somewhat different in tone from Dazed and Confused, fans of that should try it out. But at the same time, not expect it to capture lightning in a bottle like that though. It's special in its own way.

crumbsroom 11-29-20 09:27 PM

Music!



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3ZwWnXuB_eg

Jinnistan 11-30-20 08:59 PM

You should slap together a 25 top film list, crumbs. Gotta do it tonight. Shreik of the Mutilated isn't going to vote for its shaggy self.


edit: nvm, I saw you've been added already.

crumbsroom 11-30-20 09:20 PM

Originally Posted by Jinnistan (Post 2145731)
You should slap together a 25 top film list, crumbs. Gotta do it tonight. Shreik of the Mutilated isn't going to vote for its shaggy self.


edit: nvm, I saw you've been added already.

My list was painfully respectable. It seems my current domesticity have taken the edge off of my painful contrarianism

Rockatansky 11-30-20 10:22 PM

My list was looking really obvious, so I switched out a few of the really obvious picks lower in the list and then flipped the order. Not sure if that defeats the purpose but I figured it would keep things interesting.

Wooley 11-30-20 11:02 PM

Originally Posted by crumbsroom (Post 2144977)
Even though it is somewhat different in tone from Dazed and Confused, fans of that should try it out. But at the same time, not expect it to capture lightning in a bottle like that though. It's special in its own way.
I am a huge fan of Dazed And Confused. Maybe that's partly why I've avoided, fear that my expectations will be too high.

Wooley 11-30-20 11:07 PM

I never make lists and I kinda half-assedly tried for this but it just didn't really come together.
Maybe I'll try to pull one together right now before I got to bed... but I do hate to be slapdash about something it sounds like people take pretty seriously around here.

Takoma11 12-01-20 12:05 AM

Originally Posted by Wooley (Post 2145762)
I never make lists and I kinda half-assedly tried for this but it just didn't really come together.
Maybe I'll try to pull one together right now before I got to bed... but I do hate to be slapdash about something it sounds like people take pretty seriously around here.
Slapdash is a pretty good descriptor of how I put my list together. I pulled up all the movies I gave a 10/10 on IMDb then just went with my gut. It ended up being shockingly American-centric and with a definite lean toward more recent films, but oh well. They were my favorite 25 movies on Sunday. The only thing I can say for sure is what ended up on top.

crumbsroom 12-01-20 12:47 PM

The number one and two on my list are always gimmes. The movie I have the strongest emotional reaction to and the movie I legit think is the greatest ever made. After that who knows. There is a mix of movies I just think are great, movies I have nostalgia for, movies that I feel need to be there to be more representational of my tastes.

Mostly, it's all a lie.

Captain Terror 12-01-20 01:48 PM

Re: Watching Movies Alone with crumbsroom
 
Awarding 25 points to the Amityville Horror is really going to skew the results

crumbsroom 12-01-20 02:26 PM

Originally Posted by Captain Terror (Post 2145890)
Awarding 25 points to the Amityville Horror is really going to skew the results
What can I say? I'm a sucker for horror movies that terrify with scenes of misplaced money clips.

Jinnistan 12-01-20 11:32 PM

Originally Posted by crumbsroom (Post 2145740)
My list was painfully respectable. It seems my current domesticity have taken the edge off of my painful contrarianism
I just picked some random Andrew Prine movies and substituted a couple of pornographic puns in the titles.

Jinnistan 12-01-20 11:33 PM

I let Chisum stand as it is.

Takoma11 12-01-20 11:42 PM

Originally Posted by Captain Terror (Post 2145890)
Awarding 25 points to the Amityville Horror is really going to skew the results
I thought we were all putting The Conjuring at #1.

Right, guys? RIGHT?!?!

SpelingError 12-02-20 12:05 AM

Originally Posted by Takoma11 (Post 2146122)
I thought we were all putting The Conjuring at #1.

Right, guys? RIGHT?!?!
I put Hereditary at number 1 to piss off Stu.

Captain Terror 12-02-20 12:07 AM

Originally Posted by Takoma11 (Post 2146122)
I thought we were all putting The Conjuring at #1.

Right, guys? RIGHT?!?!
Nobody told me that!
*deletes The Sinful Dwarf from list

StuSmallz 12-02-20 03:52 AM

Originally Posted by SpelingError (Post 2146130)
I put Hereditary at number 1 to piss off Stu.
https://i.ibb.co/ZKTdmXh/tenor.gif

crumbsroom 12-02-20 11:52 AM

Originally Posted by Captain Terror (Post 2146131)
Nobody told me that!
*deletes The Sinful Dwarf from list
Go with your heart! And your inner dwarf, no matter how sinful!

https://i.postimg.cc/63GFX1jk/sin.jpg

crumbsroom 12-02-20 12:30 PM

Originally Posted by Takoma11 (Post 2146122)
I thought we were all putting The Conjuring at #1.

Right, guys? RIGHT?!?!
Hey, hey, let's be reasonable here!

Sedai 12-02-20 01:00 PM

Originally Posted by Captain Terror (Post 2145890)
Awarding 25 points to the Amityville Horror is really going to skew the results
That can't be his number one - James Wan didn't direct! ;)

crumbsroom 12-02-20 05:06 PM

Originally Posted by Sedai (Post 2146213)
That can't be his number one - James Wan didn't direct! ;)
This reminds me, I'm already on page 3 of my thread and haven't told James Wan to go **** himself yet.

Hmm. I must be maturing.

ThatDarnMKS 12-02-20 05:10 PM

Originally Posted by crumbsroom (Post 2146360)
This reminds me, I'm already on page 3 of my thread and haven't told James Wan to go **** himself yet.

Hmm. I must be maturing.
Just read a neat Twitter thread about how he connected with amateur writers and DPs and was willing to take a chance on them while working on INSIDIOUS and ultimately helped elevate them into steady careers in Hollywood. Seems like a swell fella.

crumbsroom 12-02-20 05:17 PM

Originally Posted by ThatDarnMKS (Post 2146363)
Just read a neat Twitter thread about how he connected with amateur writers and DPs and was willing to take a chance on them while working on INSIDIOUS and ultimately helped elevate them into steady careers in Hollywood. Seems like a swell fella.
People were allowed to continue with their careers after Insidioius?

Seriously, fuuuuuck thaaat guuuuuy!

ThatDarnMKS 12-02-20 05:23 PM

Originally Posted by crumbsroom (Post 2146374)
People were allowed to continue with their careers after Insidioius?

Seriously, fuuuuuck thaaat guuuuuy!
Aquaman had an octopus that plays drums.

crumbsroom 12-02-20 05:39 PM

Originally Posted by ThatDarnMKS (Post 2146378)
Aquaman had an octopus that plays drums.
I had no idea he even directed that. At least I can't blame him for me never wanting to see that one ;)

crumbsroom 12-02-20 06:05 PM

This is an ancient "The Beyond" write-up that I'm just posting because I'm finding all of these things in old Word files. Fun fun. Not sure if there are spoilers, because I haven't read it over again, but there is a medium chance of that.

THE DELICATE ART OF NEGLECT: THE HALF ASSED GENIUS OF LUCIO FULCI

https://i.postimg.cc/HWwzkQwM/The-Beyond-poster.png
If it doesn’t fizz or pop or ooze, Lucio Fulci isn’t interested in the details. If it can’t be removed by force or eaten while still alive, he’s just going to shrug and ask what difference should the rest of the movie make to him. At times the reek of his indifference is unavoidable. His characters will float in and out of frame, appearing as apparitions that we have hardly been given any reason to believe in. As for his stories, they will be less written and more the result of a slight disorder of the stomach, containing not so much a plot as they do a fragment of an underdone potato. Fulci, like the miserly Ebeneezer Scrooge resolutely denying the presence of Jacob Marley’s ghost, simply will not pay his movies any more mind than he would a slight derangement of the senses. He’ll dismiss them as nothing but a delusion being played on his audience, a trick upon the nervous system brought about by either an undigested bit of beef or a piece of cheese, something one simply must wait to run its course. Until the main attraction arrives, loudly shaking its chains and demanding to be whipped bloody, Fulci makes it quite clear that he is not about to be disturbed into sweating over such frivolities as logic or coherence. These would only get in the way of all the vile things he came here to do and so please take your complaints that nothing makes any sense elsewhere. Fulci is not in the business of holding your hand through his plotting. In fact, he’s probably the last person to be asking for any sorts of directions around these parts. He does not know where he is going any more than you do, and so to ever trust the way he is pointing is to soon vanish forever from the face of earth.

But if you are really determined in seeing what Fulci is in the business of doing, go ahead if you must and offer him your hand. Dismemberment bait such as this, after all, is the only way to ensure you’ll get his attention. In fact, it seems that the only time we will ever definitively know what is happening in one of his films is in those moments when something suddenly appears that is just the perfect size to shove into some poor souls eye socket. Then, without fail, whether this object happens to be something long and sharp like a screwdriver, or blunt and forceful like a thumb, we can finally be certain as to what is about to happen next in a Fulci film. It is a rare moment. And as long as the actor in question does not blink or suddenly look away as the pressure is applied, Fulci can at long last utter his declarative artistic mantra of “Gouge it out”.

Now, of course, Fulci isn't nearly as narrow minded of a director to not give consideration to any other tasty appendage that may appear on screen. Really anything at all that can be thrashed until it is a squirting pulp will do. But it will only be when such opportunities as this appear that Fulci will finally manage to wrestle himself up from his lethargy and start making clear headed decisions as the director of the film. Decisions such as suddenly moving the cameras as close as possible to the carnage so that every bit of gloop that is about to be excreted, and every strip of latex skin that’s about to be picked clean from a bone, is all captured in loving detail. In these moments he will focus the film so narrowly that the rest of the movie ceases to exist. And if you miss anything the first time, worry not. He will likely show it again from a different angle; play it over and over again like the unfurling brains of JFK in the Zapruder film. When he’s finally finished the actor will have pretty much dissolved under the director’s enthusiasm. As much as Hitchcock liked to claim that he treated his actors as cattle, Fulci is the master of the abattoir that they are sent to. While they are in his care, all they can do is mill about aimlessly in their stalls while they wait for the fates he is itching to dole out.

Ultimately though this will be the curse of every great work by Fulci. He seems not only to be unaware that he is supposed to be making an entire film, he seems even less aware that this film that he has thus far been neglecting has actually been pretty damn good so far. Well, at least up until the point he stops everything to give us the money shot that we really don’t need.

This is the great unfortunate truth of Fulci’s filmmaking. That for all of his fame as a master of cheap and unnecessary splatter, it’s this very signature of his that often threatens to undo the strange, hypnotic indifference that often haunts the surrounding scenes in his films. When he suddenly chooses to ground his movies in these methodological scenes of gore, it works in stark contrast to what has been so compulsively interesting about them up until that point. As soon as he starts making a show of detailing the long process of separating an arm from its body, or how flesh can be as malleable as warm cheese when under the pinch of some teeth, his movies no longer feel so beautifully beyond any kind of control or internal logic. They now seem to have a purpose, and it’s a cheap and ugly one.

As it turns out where a Fulci film is most unsettling is in those moments where we realize that he has given us absolutely no sign posts to guide us through these worlds he’s created. It is a completely alien terrain to the average movie goer. He grants us no characters we can ever truly trust, since he never really bothers to properly introduce us to any of them. Also, his villains aren’t given anything but the vaguest of end games, so we can never be sure exactly what it is they want, or just what awful thing they might do to get it. Even the very destination that his movies lead us to think we are heading towards will eventually become abstracted as we realize we will never make it all the way there. Instead we are forever destined to be left swirling in the indecisive toilet flush of his plotting. His movies are like some awful place we visit in a nightmare that we keep trying to run away from, only to keep returning to their beginning. They can’t be escaped from or reasoned with. They are a purgatory with only the sound of terribly dubbed voices calling out to guide us. In such a strange and disorienting place as this, all that a prolonged scene of a characters dismemberment can possibly do is commit the sin of giving us enough time to regain our bearings, recapture our balance, suddenly make us aware that all we are actually watching might only be some cruddy slice of unenthusiastic exploitation.

There are occasions though where the deliberateness of Fulci’s more stupidly violent impulses can actually sharpen the sense of horror that is always lying in wait just beneath his muddied storytelling. It’s in The Beyond that two such scenes can be found, and while in typical Fulci fashion they can’t help but grind the whole film to a momentary standstill, they also seem to strangely compliment the elusive, impossible to pin down strangeness of the surrounding film. In both of these instances, whether the victims are meeting their agonizing demise at the hands of spiders who pull apart their face one nostril at a time, or the moment where, after an unfortunate spillage of hydrochloric acid, a young girl is chased from a room by a frothing pool of her mothers melted head, something just seems off, and no matter how close the cameras are shoved into the details of these deaths, the less real they end up seeming. This is because our director never gives these victims of his the go ahead to struggle against their fates. In both cases these characters just lie there in passive acceptance of their coming disintegration. They do not scream, or even make any move to get away. All they can do is lay there like props as Fulci gets what he wants from them.

So it is even in these moments, where everything slows down and the cameras zoom ever closer, that the audience is still left puzzled at how they are supposed to react to the images on screen. In any traditional film such scenes of violence would either elicit sympathy, or cause us to wince, or at the very lest titillate, but this is not so in Fulci’s world. Even as we voyeuristically peer closer and closer in on the death of a character, the audience is never entirely convinced to take any active participation in what they are watching. There is absolutely no appeal for us to begin rooting for the survival of these characters, nor are we permitted to feel any empathy for their pain. The closer we watch over their final moments, the less like people they even seem. Not only does Fulci end up letting the camera’s linger long enough to start noticing the artifice of his plastic spiders, and the not-quite-human pigment of the skin that is slowly being dissolved by acid, he’s also letting us see in great detail how even the victims in his films are more figments than actual people. By denying them the most base of reactions—an urge for survival, a response to pain, a cry for help—he strips us of our ability to at least see something of ourselves in his films. In this way his approach remains consistent, whether it be during his strange, elliptical plotting and impenetrable character motivations, or if it's just a simple matter of gratuitous blood letting. These are not worlds we can understand through any sort of standard logic. We are treated merely as tourists in these films, and while Fucli might on occasion slow the tour bus down to let us get an eyeful of some roadside carnage, before long we are pushing forward as if nothing of any great significance even happened. When a character dies in one of his films, there is never even a void felt in their ensuing absence. It’s like they were entirely erased from the films memory.

The effect of this, whether intentional or not, creates a movie experience that's as hopelessly impossible to remember in detail as a dream. It merely lingers in the back of our mind like a repressed memory. By the time it finishes, while we have the sense that we may have seen some unpleasant things along the way, and that there was something vaguely menacing happening that we were meant to feel threatened by, the more we try and put our fingers on what we just experienced, the easier it becomes to dismiss the whole film as something that had been imagined in the throes of some fever. That it never really even happened. For surrealists such as Bunuel or Jodorowsky, such an effect would be the desired result after years of hard work honing their craft. But for Fulci, this ability comes so effortlessly you get the sense that he could do it in his sleep. It's a technique one can easily imagine that he took advantage of indulging as often as possible while on the set of The Beyond, and if it weren't for the constant nuisance of having to wake up and call out 'Action', it's possible Fulci's entire filmography would have never left his mind as he slept through his entire career. I can practically see him, dozing eye pressed up against his camera, shut firmly to prevent gouging, twitching ever so slightly at all of the terrible things in his head.


ThatDarnMKS 12-02-20 06:12 PM

Originally Posted by crumbsroom (Post 2146386)
I had no idea he even directed that. At least I can't blame him for me never wanting to see that one ;)
I don’t know how I can say “octopus playing the drums” and you file that under “never wanting to see.”

crumbsroom 12-02-20 06:14 PM

Originally Posted by ThatDarnMKS (Post 2146399)
I don’t know how I can say “octopus playing the drums” and you file that under “never wanting to see.”
Um, it makes me think of something that would happen in the Flintstones live action movie.
Not that I ever watched that either, but it sure seems like something I'd hate.

ThatDarnMKS 12-02-20 06:22 PM

Originally Posted by crumbsroom (Post 2146400)
Um, it makes me think of something that would happen in the Flintstones live action movie.
Not that I ever watched that either, but it sure seems like something I'd hate.
Since when has hating something dissuaded you from watching? I thought I knew you.

crumbsroom 12-02-20 06:39 PM

Originally Posted by ThatDarnMKS (Post 2146401)
Since when has hating something dissuaded you from watching? I thought I knew you.
Some hate is beautiful and full of poems. Other hate has Rick Moranis with bleached hair and a Party City loincloth. You can't help but learn the distinction between the two once you've become a connoisseur at ruining all your free time with terrible viewing habits.

Jinnistan 12-02-20 06:58 PM

Originally Posted by ThatDarnMKS (Post 2146399)
I don’t know how I can say “octopus playing the drums” and you file that under “never wanting to see.”
Already seen it. Wan's ripping off Angela Lansbury now?


https://chefskiss.files.wordpress.co...rummer_500.gif

ThatDarnMKS 12-02-20 07:05 PM

Originally Posted by Jinnistan (Post 2146420)
Already seen it. Wan's ripping off Angela Lansbury now?


https://chefskiss.files.wordpress.co...rummer_500.gif
If I say yes, wouldn’t that be even more appetizing?

crumbsroom 12-02-20 08:15 PM

Originally Posted by Jinnistan (Post 2146420)
Already seen it. Wan's ripping off Angela Lansbury now?


https://chefskiss.files.wordpress.co...rummer_500.gif
I'm sure Wan has some ingenious way to make it soulless and dead inside.

While I'm sure this is an irrelevant question to a lot of filmgoers, and fairly so, I want to ask fans of him 'who is James Wan'?

If your answer is 'who cares', this is probably why we'll never see eye to eye on what this guy is doing.

crumbsroom 12-02-20 09:33 PM

Jinnistan? Whats your take on the band Bedhead? I've had two of their records lying around forever and been kind of meh. But over the last year I'm falling in love with them.


You know 90s ethos way better than I, but I'm on board for this.


Words!

Rockatansky 12-02-20 11:00 PM

Originally Posted by crumbsroom (Post 2146468)
I'm sure Wan has some ingenious way to make it soulless and dead inside.

While I'm sure this is an irrelevant question to a lot of filmgoers, and fairly so, I want to ask fans of him 'who is James Wan'?

If your answer is 'who cares', this is probably why we'll never see eye to eye on what this guy is doing.
Somebody who loved Poltergeist and was scared to death of creepy looking dolls growing up, and has been chasing that high ever since. I think the second Conjuring is the most personal movie he's made so far, in that it seems to combine everything he finds appealing in one movie. I could do without his blockbusters, although Aquaman is significantly more bearable than Furious 7.

Rockatansky 12-02-20 11:01 PM

Re: Watching Movies Alone with crumbsroom
 
Also, I like the Flintstones movie, if only because John Goodman is a perfect Fred Flintstone.

ThatDarnMKS 12-02-20 11:15 PM

Originally Posted by crumbsroom (Post 2146468)
I'm sure Wan has some ingenious way to make it soulless and dead inside.

While I'm sure this is an irrelevant question to a lot of filmgoers, and fairly so, I want to ask fans of him 'who is James Wan'?

If your answer is 'who cares', this is probably why we'll never see eye to eye on what this guy is doing.
What kind of answer would you find satisfying?

crumbsroom 12-03-20 01:09 PM

Originally Posted by Rockatansky (Post 2146518)
Somebody who loved Poltergeist and was scared to death of creepy looking dolls growing up, and has been chasing that high ever since. I think the second Conjuring is the most personal movie he's made so far, in that it seems to combine everything he finds appealing in one movie. I could do without his blockbusters, although Aquaman is significantly more bearable than Furious 7.

I imagine that's generally what he was going for, something comforting and familiar in the genre. Probably also why it didn't do much for me, because I prefer horror to cast me into territory where I am unsure of my footing. I felt like I was retracing me footsteps backwards like Danny Torrence in the maze watching it. Just without any sort of threat behind me to escape from

Wooley 12-03-20 01:21 PM

Originally Posted by Takoma11 (Post 2145775)
Slapdash is a pretty good descriptor of how I put my list together. I pulled up all the movies I gave a 10/10 on IMDb then just went with my gut. It ended up being shockingly American-centric and with a definite lean toward more recent films, but oh well. They were my favorite 25 movies on Sunday. The only thing I can say for sure is what ended up on top.
Yeah, my slapdashery resulted in a pretty decent list of movies but I felt certain that there were several major favorites that I forgot and won't get votes. Too bad.

Wooley 12-03-20 01:22 PM

Originally Posted by ThatDarnMKS (Post 2146378)
Aquaman had an octopus that plays drums.
:dizzy::laugh:

Wooley 12-03-20 01:24 PM

Originally Posted by crumbsroom (Post 2146400)
Um, it makes me think of something that would happen in the Flintstones live action movie.
Not that I ever watched that either, but it sure seems like something I'd hate.
Tonally, that's about where Aquaman falls.
It's probably Wan's worst film overall and therefore made hundreds of millions of dollars and cemented the next phase of his career.

crumbsroom 12-03-20 02:06 PM

Originally Posted by ThatDarnMKS (Post 2146525)
What kind of answer would you find satisfying?

Only curious if The Conjuring or Wan in general showcases any kind of identity of their own. Or if competency is what is his bread and butter

ThatDarnMKS 12-03-20 02:52 PM

Originally Posted by crumbsroom (Post 2146712)
Only curious if The Conjuring or Wan in general showcases any kind of identity of their own. Or if competency is what is his bread and butter
I’d say his technical proficiency is part of his identity but when I think of Wan, outside of familial themes and his clear puppet trauma, the way he applies that proficiency to increasingly complex set pieces gives him a fairly distinct voice in his genre. The polish in his work is clearly inspired and at worst derivative of Spielberg and Fincher, but he applies that attention and zeal to genre pieces that would normally favor simple set-ups and jump scares.

One need only compare the complexity and measured use of timing and space in the clapping sequence in the Conjuring to virtually any scare in Annabelle or the Nun. Wan has a distinct feel in this arena and applies it to sequences throughout his work, regardless of genre (the parking lot chase from Death Sentence immediately comes to mind).

crumbsroom 12-03-20 03:38 PM

Originally Posted by ThatDarnMKS (Post 2146728)
I’d say his technical proficiency is part of his identity but when I think of Wan, outside of familial themes and his clear puppet trauma, the way he applies that proficiency to increasingly complex set pieces gives him a fairly distinct voice in his genre. The polish in his work is clearly inspired and at worst derivative of Spielberg and Fincher, but he applies that attention and zeal to genre pieces that would normally favor simple set-ups and jump scares.

One need only compare the complexity and measured use of timing and space in the clapping sequence in the Conjuring to virtually any scare in Annabelle or the Nun. Wan has a distinct feel in this arena and applies it to sequences throughout his work, regardless of genre (the parking lot chase from Death Sentence immediately comes to mind).

I am on the record as appreciating the clapping scene.


And I did actually not mind the Conjuring sequel, for its sense of space and use of environment, but I'm not even sure if he directed that

SpelingError 12-03-20 03:50 PM

Originally Posted by crumbsroom (Post 2146750)
And I did actually not mind the Conjuring sequel, for its sense of space and use of environment, but I'm not even sure if he directed that
He did direct it, so that means you finally enjoyed one of his films, eh?

crumbsroom 12-03-20 03:53 PM

Originally Posted by SpelingError (Post 2146756)
He did direct it, so that means you finally enjoyed one of his films, eh?
Enjoyed is a stretch. Still thought lots of it was kind of crap. The mood generated by that house though, with the little makeshift fort at the end of the hall, I thought was quite good.

SpelingError 12-03-20 04:05 PM

Re: Watching Movies Alone with crumbsroom
 
The biggest issue I had with The Conjuring was that the pacing in it was so high that very few scares had time to settle in. As stated upthread, the hide and clap scene is a great example of an effective scare, but in most other cases, it felt like several big scares back to back in the span of 5 minutes. Instead of immersing me into the atmosphere, I thought many of these scenes ended before they were able to build up enough tension. I do think other bits work pretty well though, so overall, I enjoyed the film.

ThatDarnMKS 12-03-20 05:04 PM

Originally Posted by crumbsroom (Post 2146760)
Enjoyed is a stretch. Still thought lots of it was kind of crap. The mood generated by that house though, with the little makeshift fort at the end of the hall, I thought was quite good.
This is starting to feel a little “one of us! Gooble gobble” up in here.

Jinnistan 12-03-20 05:37 PM

Originally Posted by crumbsroom (Post 2146491)
Jinnistan? Whats your take on the band Bedhead? I've had two of their records lying around forever and been kind of meh. But over the last year I'm falling in love with them.


You know 90s ethos way better than I, but I'm on board for this.


Words!
Hm, bit put on the spot. I'm not sure I found them memorable enough for too many words. There were a lot of bands like them at the time, I didn't think Bedhead were as interesting as some of my go-tos at the time, like Sea & Cake or Gastr del Sol or somebody. I'm not sure if I even have a copy of Beheaded anymore. I might compare to some other under-the-radar names, like Space Needle, Duster, Pell Mell.


I'm probably due for a deep dive revisit of those late-90s indie bands. But if you were wondering, no, Bedhead was not on my old RT 90s list.


Been rocking the 8-cd Sign o' the Times set recently. I wish they added the concert film (because at that price, why not?), but it does have a concert from that tour which, imo, is a tighter line-up than the album. To assuage, they threw in video of his 87 new years party with Miles Davis, so.....I'm alright.

Jinnistan 12-05-20 06:46 PM

https://s5.dpic.me/7r6cp7fgdauj5vh7r...he_fairies.jpg




You may have already seen it, but I'm going to have to watch this Poison For the Fairies business.

crumbsroom 12-05-20 06:48 PM

Originally Posted by Jinnistan (Post 2147848)
https://s5.dpic.me/7r6cp7fgdauj5vh7r...he_fairies.jpg




You may have already seen it, but I'm going to have to watch this Poison For the Fairies business.

Sounds a bit like Don't Deliver Us From Evil, which I like, but I don't know this one at all.


Neat

crumbsroom 12-06-20 02:53 PM

For many, the entire career of Marcel Marceau could be viewed as a decades long preamble to a single declaration of ”No”. As the word most often reserved to greet the advances of wayward mimes, in Silent Movie, the tables will be turned. Mel Brooks instead offers it to Marceau as the only audible line of dialogue that will be spoken in the film. It will famously be shouted over a telephone to make it clear he wants no part of Brooks’ attempt at reviving pre-sound movies. For once, it is the mime that doesn’t want us.

Normally, they aren’t quite so easy to get rid of as this. Doggedly fighting against all manner of wind and invisible boxes to accost their audience, the mime has a known history of harassment, no matter how whimsically silent. A pest as persistent as the cockroach, they demand to entertain us, no matter how wretched our faces become as they approach. So it can hardly come as any surprise that in William Castle’s “Shanks”, made only a few years previously, we can easily detect this neediness for an audience, as unhealthily present as ever. It’s in the very marrow of Marceau’s bird like bones, so deep we can sense it even when he is not performing one of his silent tricks. It almost seems as if he is just as captive to his artform as the audiences he corners.

In playing the lead character of deaf-mute puppeteer Maurice Shanks, it will turn out that even while unburdened from the make-up and costume of his most famous alter ego—Bip the Clown—Marceau still cannot help but move with a pathological carefulness. Even when playing an ordinary man, engaged in ordinary functions such as walking across a room, it is as if each step he takes was only allowed to be considered after first being studied for many hours in front of a dance studio mirror. He is as majestic as he is unnatural. And to witness the extraordinary confidence he shows over every twitch and pivot his body makes, is to conversely realize the enormous self-consciousness that must fuel such superhuman control. Hardly able to move a muscle without first supposing an audience, there is a tragic air to his gait. No longer encased inside of the secure greasepaint of Bip the Clown, he can best be likened to a hermit crab after being shoehorned from its shell, strutting like it thinks we can’t see how edible he’s just become. But we can’t help notice this vulnerability, not as long as we continue watching how unwilling or unable he is to just be ordinary for even a moment.

Unfortunately for Marceau, these alien qualities of his only lend a movie already abundant in inert strangeness yet another layer of peculiarity without much of a point. In the beginning of the film, as we are introduced to his puppets, and also a mysterious Old Man (also played by Marceau) who teaches him the art of puppeteering living beings, it seems we are going into interesting places. There almost seems a natural kinship between the form of the films narrative, and the way in which Marceau’s compulsive miming is constantly tugging upon his own strings. There are hopes we will get a glimpse at the sadness at the root of the need to perform. The prison it constructs for those talented enough to become successful.

Instead, what we get is a concept that seems as if it was little more than a vehicle to stage a series of scenes for mimes to sabotage with considerably less guilt than is deserved. And worst of all, Marceau hardly will participate in these scenes. Their success will mostly be left up to second stringers, who dance and bob and wiggle for the approval of the man in control of them both on-screen (as he twists and turns the knobs he uses to control them), and off screen (choreographing all of the movements the audience would likely much prefer he perform himself). It is almost as if Marceau is taking some kind of revenge on the entirety of the mime world.

Watching it all unfold feels like such a miscalculation on the part of everyone involved that it almost has to be wondered how deliberate this all was. To be forced to witness the world’s greatest mime, trapped inside of one of the most inexpressive characters in cinematic history, all we can do is watch his talent seep pointlessly out from all of the mundane actions he commits to the screen. It feels almost criminal, especially when we are forced to watch considerably less talented clowns take up so much of the screen time doing things we know he could do better.

Only briefly does Marceau give himself any moments to really shine, and it will only be as the character Old Man Walker, who the story chooses to bury beneath the ground within the first half hour. Committing himself to a beautifully tragic/comic sequence where he is raised from the dead by a puppeteer not yet familiar with the burden of manipulating a full-grown human body, Marceau’s performance here is so clever and diabolically accomplished, its only function seems to be to shame what comes next, which will mostly be a bunch of desperate jitterbugging by lesser lights than him. When the character thankfully returns at the climax of the film, it is only a cruel punctuation mark to their obvious not-very-goodness.

So maybe, after all, I need to reconsider my first assumption of this piece. Maybe Silent Movie was not the only instance where a mime could not find the time for his audience. Maybe Shanks is Marceau’s attempt at taking the art form he dedicated his life and body to and using it to trap and disappoint the audience that has voluntarily come to see him. Why, after all, should he be the only one that mime has captured for its nefarious purposes. By this point, Marceau must have known he would never escape, no matter how loudly he shouted ‘NO’'.






crumbsroom 12-07-20 05:44 PM

For everyone who's ever been told they blow their nose too loud, come hither. A movie to quell your cries of 'egad my face is leaking'. A balm for your gushy forehead. Bandages are no longer necessary. Let the pus unsoak and shimmer. It is your time to shine like the unpeeled scab that you are. Join us, you unclotted misfits and bodily fluid drippers of all shapes and slices. Slime City believes in you. Will soak up your excess viscosity. Celebrate your slippery even as it gets sloppy. It is the place we need to get all sticky stuck together.

Inclusivity! Brotherhood! Excretion! Hooray!

Who needs the Sight and Sound poll anyways??? Let us drip all over it!



crumbsroom 12-07-20 08:19 PM

Originally Posted by Jinnistan (Post 2146793)
Hm, bit put on the spot. I'm not sure I found them memorable enough for too many words. There were a lot of bands like them at the time, I didn't think Bedhead were as interesting as some of my go-tos at the time, like Sea & Cake or Gastr del Sol or somebody. I'm not sure if I even have a copy of Beheaded anymore. I might compare to some other under-the-radar names, like Space Needle, Duster, Pell Mell.


I'm probably due for a deep dive revisit of those late-90s indie bands. But if you were wondering, no, Bedhead was not on my old RT 90s list.


Been rocking the 8-cd Sign o' the Times set recently. I wish they added the concert film (because at that price, why not?), but it does have a concert from that tour which, imo, is a tighter line-up than the album. To assuage, they threw in video of his 87 new years party with Miles Davis, so.....I'm alright.

Beheaded is one that I have. Forget the title of the other one. It took a long time to worm its way into me, it seemed so unassuming and uneventful the first half dozen listens. They've grown on me.


Sign o the Times is the one great Prince album I've never entirely been able to get into, and never sure why. It's loaded with tonnes of good songs and a perverse amount of variety. But I somehow always end up feeling underwhelmed by the whole thing. Maybe this is what other people experience when listening to the White Album

Jinnistan 12-07-20 10:08 PM

Originally Posted by crumbsroom (Post 2149129)
Sign o the Times is the one great Prince album I've never entirely been able to get into, and never sure why. It's loaded with tonnes of good songs and a perverse amount of variety. But I somehow always end up feeling underwhelmed by the whole thing. Maybe this is what other people experience when listening to the White Album
It's a potpourri of a number of failed projects (Dream Factory, Crystal Ball, Camile) from the year prior, an insanely productive period. It's also Prince's attempt to scrub the influence of Wendy & Lisa out of the music, which he could barely do. That's why I've always preferred the concert film because by then he had assembled a great band that took "Housequake", "Strange Relationship" and "U Got the Look" to a new level.


Because of the volume of his (available) recordings from the period, as well as the very many alts an remixes in this set, I haven't been able to yet sort out all of the threads. There is a 12 minute version of "Soul Psychedelicide", which was previously only available as an hour-long rehearsal from his '86 tour. Even with the vast number of boots from the period, that vault can produce treasures.

Jinnistan 12-07-20 10:18 PM

I wonder if we can use this thread to snicker about the Top 100 list with no one noticing :shifty:


It was pahaK where I learned of the above film from Carlos Taboada, and really the best thing to come out of it so far. (I'll let Rock handle the, um, pink stuff.)


Did you catch the 2010 list? It's, ah, very 2010. But really the one legit bizarre thing that stood out to me.....Quills?


I mean, not a bad movie, but just one of those toss a dart in a 2000-era Blockbuster Video and hit a 6.5/10 kind of movies. Definitely subpar to Peter Brooks' Marat/Sade but what are you going to do?


It's got to be Amelia Warner though, right? Lots of fans? I completely get it myself. Those thumbs aren't going to suck themselves.

ThatDarnMKS 12-07-20 11:03 PM

I tried to find the top 100 in that thread but it seemed neither near the beginning nor the end and I gave up searching it. How Reddit top 100 is it?

crumbsroom 12-07-20 11:17 PM

I've got no realissues with the old list. It certainly doesn't align with my particular tastes, but then that would be one awful (wonderful) selection, unfit for mere mortals. Maybe I'm just used to people championing stuff that doesnt do much for me.

Quills is a head scratcher though. But then again, back in the real early days of RT, I remember Ninth Configuration being generated as some kind of Citizen Kane level achievement. And while I find both these movies interesting on some level, they certainly aren't things you'd expect to be celebrated by the average film goer. Which is what I suppose makes the making of these lists interesting. The odd ducks that sneak in. You know, like I'm expecting Blood of Dracula to do on this one.

SpelingError 12-07-20 11:26 PM

Originally Posted by ThatDarnMKS (Post 2149205)
I tried to find the top 100 in that thread but it seemed neither near the beginning nor the end and I gave up searching it. How Reddit top 100 is it?
It's here:

https://www.movieforums.com/lists/mo...2010/edit.html

Overall, a bit too 21st century and far too U.S.A. centric for my tastes, and it kinda feels like the average GOAT list you find around the internet, but there are some great films on there.

SpelingError 12-07-20 11:29 PM

I wish I saved the top 50 on the Corrierino forum which was made in the early 2010s. There were plenty of films on it which I rarely, if not never, see on GOAT lists. Did anyone save it by any chance?

Jinnistan 12-07-20 11:37 PM

Originally Posted by crumbsroom (Post 2149207)
I've got no realissues with the old list.
Nah, it's fine, and exactly what I would expect a 2010 RT list to look like. I gather there were only about 30 voters then, so the new one will be more eclectic. I'm just hoping that my Bergman pick makes it.



Originally Posted by crumbsroom (Post 2149207)
I remember Ninth Configuration being generated as some kind of Citizen Kane level achievement.
When I remembered Ninth Configuration, I was actually remembering The Final Countdown until I realized a few minutes ago. I guess it's just that memorable.

ThatDarnMKS 12-07-20 11:46 PM

Originally Posted by SpelingError (Post 2149212)
It's here:

https://www.movieforums.com/lists/mo...2010/edit.html

Overall, a bit too 21st century and far too U.S.A. centric for my tastes, and it kinda feels like the average GOAT list you find around the internet, but there are some great films on there.
Appreciate it. I've seen 96 of em. Sigh. So close.

SpelingError 12-07-20 11:49 PM

Originally Posted by SpelingError (Post 2149213)
I wish I saved the top 50 on the Corrierino forum which was made in the early 2010s. There were plenty of films on it which I rarely, if not never, see on GOAT lists. I was really impressed by it. Did anyone save it by any chance?
I hope Oxnard comes here someday. As I recall, I think he saved it.

SpelingError 12-07-20 11:50 PM

Originally Posted by ThatDarnMKS (Post 2149223)
Appreciate it. I've seen 96 of em. Sigh. So close.
I've seen 69 of them. I wonder if there's some kind of significance between that number and my daily activities.

ThatDarnMKS 12-08-20 12:20 AM

Originally Posted by SpelingError (Post 2149229)
I've seen 69 of them. I wonder if there's some kind of significance between that number and my daily activities.
...

...

WARNING: spoilers below
Nice.

crumbsroom 12-08-20 09:52 AM

Originally Posted by ThatDarnMKS (Post 2149223)
Appreciate it. I've seen 96 of em. Sigh. So close.
100

kgaard 12-08-20 11:29 AM

1 Attachment(s)
Originally Posted by SpelingError (Post 2149212)
It's here:

https://www.movieforums.com/lists/mo...2010/edit.html

Overall, a bit too 21st century and far too U.S.A. centric for my tastes, and it kinda feels like the average GOAT list you find around the internet, but there are some great films on there.
98 Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom
99 Mystic River

John Dumbear 12-08-20 11:34 AM

Seen 72 of them. Glad to see crumbsroom resurrect this thread here. Enjoyed it at the Corrie, even if I rarely seen any of films mentioned.

crumbsroom 12-08-20 11:58 AM

Originally Posted by John Dumbear (Post 2149429)
Seen 72 of them. Glad to see crumbsroom resurrect this thread here. Enjoyed it at the Corrie, even if I rarely seen any of films mentioned.
I am what happens to a person when they run out of movies. It gets dark, people.

Yoda 12-08-20 12:00 PM

Originally Posted by kgaard (Post 2149426)
98 Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom
99 Mystic River
Look it was a different time.

(We also only had a few dozen ballots.)

kgaard 12-08-20 12:05 PM

Originally Posted by Yoda (Post 2149444)
Look it was a different time.

(We also only had a few dozen ballots.)
Mostly I just wanted an excuse to post that picture of Diego Maradona (rip). I'm not a fan of those movies, but far be it from me to yuck someone else's yum.

ThatDarnMKS 12-08-20 12:14 PM

Originally Posted by crumbsroom (Post 2149343)
100
*Spits on the floor of your thread*

crumbsroom 12-08-20 02:20 PM

Originally Posted by ThatDarnMKS (Post 2149455)
*Spits on the floor of your thread*

S'alright. It matches the decor of all my threads.

Jinnistan 12-08-20 02:52 PM

Originally Posted by Yoda (Post 2149444)
Look it was a different time.

(We also only had a few dozen ballots.)
We've been found out!!!!


https://66.media.tumblr.com/8dba9265...vt9qo1_540.gif

Jinnistan 12-08-20 02:55 PM

Originally Posted by Jinnistan (Post 2149179)
It's got to be Amelia Warner though, right? Lots of fans? I completely get it myself. Those thumbs aren't going to suck themselves.
Hm, apparently it was more of the Joaquin Phoenix fans *mumbleemoji*

crumbsroom 12-08-20 02:57 PM

Originally Posted by Jinnistan (Post 2149539)

I don't even know how many times I've been told I'm 'one of those old guys in the Muppets'. Even as a child. An innocent, babyfaced, cynical, misery brat child.

crumbsroom 12-08-20 02:59 PM

Originally Posted by Jinnistan (Post 2149542)
Hm, apparently it was more of the Joaquin Phoenix fans *mumbleemoji*

Back in the days when I had a visceral dislike of Phoenix. I think it may have taken me until The Master to have a change of heart.


And then Inherent Vice happened *chefs kiss*

Jinnistan 12-08-20 03:25 PM

Originally Posted by crumbsroom (Post 2149545)
Back in the days when I had a visceral dislike of Phoenix. I think it may have taken me until The Master to have a change of heart.


And then Inherent Vice happened *chefs kiss*
I don't know if it was ever visceral, but I definitely didn't start caring about the dude until the past decade.


OK. I probably viscerally disliked I'm Not Here. What a wet fart of a wanna-be jackass. Big surprise that they were trying to grab ass the whole time.


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